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NEWS
January 24, 2013 | By Carolyn Davis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gary Gregory stifled his tears once, then twice, as he talked about justice for his sister, Ellen Gregory Robb, who in 2006 was killed by her husband, Rafael Robb. The emotion came after the Pennsylvania Board of Probation and Parole on Wednesday rescinded its decision to release Robb, 62, from prison. The reversal came after the board received letters from Ellen Robb's family, friends, domestic violence organizations, and the judge who presided over her husband's 2007 trial. They all suggested that the former University of Pennsylvania professor remained a threat and should be kept behind bars.
NEWS
January 23, 2013
A story Tuesday about the parole of Rafael Robb wrongly attributed a statement by his wife's brother, Gary Gregory. Commenting on Robb's parole, Gregory said: "From a family perspective, we cannot get over that this guy is going free after five years for what he did.. . . The family is devastated. People haven't slept in a month. " The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357)
NEWS
January 23, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
HARRISBURG - The Pennsylvania Board of Probation and Parole said Tuesday that it will consider new information in the case former University of Pennsylvania professor Rafael Robb, who is scheduled to be paroled Monday after serving six years behind bars for beating his wife to death as she wrapped Christmas presents. The victim's brother, Gary Gregory, said that he did not want to discuss the information he gave to the board but that it is current information that the family believes shows Robb is a danger to society.
NEWS
January 23, 2013 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
Six years after Ellen Gregory Robb was beaten to death by her husband, a dozen of her Upper Merion friends gathered to remember her Monday at a gazebo they had built in her honor. What brought them together on a gray, 30-degree morning was that Robb's husband, Rafael, is scheduled to be paroled Monday, four years short of his maximum 10-year sentence for manslaughter. The friends joined Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman, members of Ellen Robb's family, and several state legislators in calling on the Board of Probation and Parole to reverse its decision to free Robb, a renowned University of Pennsylvania economist, then 56, who repeatedly attacked his wife with a metal rod Dec. 22, 2006, as she wrapped Christmas presents in their kitchen.
NEWS
January 23, 2013 | By Carolyn Davis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The brothers of Ellen Robb met Tuesday with the chairman of the state Board of Probation and Parole to try to block the release of their sister's husband, who killed her in a rage in 2006. After the meeting with Michael Potteiger in the agency's Harrisburg office, Art and Gary Gregory said they were optimistic that the board would reverse its decision to parole Rafael Robb, a former University of Pennsylvania expert in economic game theory, from prison Monday. The meeting came after Ellen Robb's family, Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman, and state representatives from Montgomery County expressed surprise at learning that Rafael Robb was to be released.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Six years after Ellen Gregory Robb was beaten to death by her husband, a dozen of her Upper Merion friends gathered to remember her Monday at a gazebo they had built in her honor. What brought them together on a gray, 30-degree morning was that Robb's husband, Rafael, is scheduled to be paroled Monday, four years short of his maximum 10-year sentence for manslaughter. The friends joined Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman, members of Ellen Robb's family, and several state legislators in calling on the Board of Probation and Parole to reverse its decision to free Robb, a renowned University of Pennsylvania economist, then 56, who repeatedly attacked his wife with a metal rod Dec. 22, 2006, as she wrapped Christmas presents in their kitchen.
NEWS
January 21, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan and Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writers
The brother of a woman bludgeoned to death by her husband, former University of Pennsylvania professor Rafael Robb, learned Friday that he would get an audience with the state parole chairman in an eleventh-hour bid to keep Robb from being released from prison. Gary Gregory, brother of Ellen Robb, slain in December 2006 in her Upper Merion home, got the call before a news conference at which state legislators and Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman accused the parole board of violating state law by denying the family the right to testify.
NEWS
January 19, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelanand Rita Giordano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The brother of a woman bludgeoned to death by her husband, former University of Pennsylvania professor Rafael Robb, learned Friday he will get an audience with the state parole chairman in an eleventh-hour bid to keep Robb from being released in prison. Gary Gregory, brother of Ellen Robb, slain in December 2006 in her Upper Merion home, got the call before a news conference at which state legislators and Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman accused the parole board of violating state law by previously denying the family the right to testify before it. State Board of Probation and Parole spokesman Leo Dunn said it is not typical but not unheard of a board chairman to meet with a victim's family.
NEWS
January 19, 2013 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
Prosecutors and members of the victim's family are seeking to block the parole of a former University of Pennsylvania economics professor who in a fit of rage beat his wife to death with an exercise bar at their Upper Merion home after she apparently told him she wanted a divorce. "I was at the crime scene with the detectives," Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman said of the 2006 crime. "And I saw, up close and personal, what a brutal crime this was. The injuries were so severe that it had the appearance of the wife being killed by a shotgun blast.
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