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FOOD
April 29, 1990 | By Leslie Land, Special to The Inquirer
For most modern vegetable-lovers, the first great delicacy from the spring garden is probably asparagus, but in the old days that title would have gone to spring-dug parsnips. In my book, it still does. "Spring dugs" are roots that matured in fall and have been left in the ground to overwinter. This increases their sweetness and seems to mellow their flavor. The common wisdom is that parsnips, like Brussels sprouts, must freeze before they are any good. But scientific experiments have proved that what they must do is simply stay very cold - as close to freezing as possible but definitely less than 40 degrees - for several weeks, during which time their formidable starch content slowly converts into sugar.
FOOD
February 2, 2012
This sturdy, streamlined ricer rests on the side of a mixing bowl as you easily press fruits and veggies, such as potatoes, carrots, parsnips, apples, into perfect purees.   - Ashley Primis OXO potato ricer, $19.99 at oxo.com.
FOOD
November 9, 2006 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Beef and parsnips are a surefire comfort- food combo that can be cooked fairly quickly if the roots are chopped. The rich flavor of the parsnips means you can bypass the butter or sour cream you might use on potatoes. And it can all be done in about half an hour. The recipe comes from In Great Taste: Fresh, Simple Recipes for Eating and Living Well (Rodale; $29.95), written by Evelyn H. Lauder to benefit the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, which she founded. Beef Tenderloin With Parsnip Mash Makes 4 servings 10 medium parsnips Pinch of kosher salt 1/2 cup nonfat (skim)
FOOD
October 22, 1986 | By POLLY FISHER, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: I bought a box of mothballs and emptied them onto the floor of my clothes closet. They did a swell job for a month or more, then fizzled out and didn't let off the smell that they are supposed to. I hate to keep buying fresh mothballs. Is there any other thing that will do the job. - Ray Dear Ray: First of all, don't leave mothballs on the floor of a closet if you have pets or small children in the house; they are toxic. Now with that out of the way, let's move on to other moth remedies.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012
1 PARSNIPS This close cousin to carrots has a sweet, nutty flavor and a more nutritious punch, lots of vitamin K and 7 grams of fiber to boot. 2 DATES They may look ugly, but dates, especially Medjools, are one of the sweetest, most satisfying fruits. They contain calcium, sulfur, iron, potassium and magnesium. 3 STAR FRUIT A tropical, juicy fruit packed with vitamin C and a slimming 30 calories a serving. Give this good source of fiber a try as a garnish in your next fruit salad.
FOOD
November 18, 1992 | By Mimmy Schmidt, FOR THE INQUIRER
Thanksgiving always seems to be upon us before we get the chance to really plan it. So we end up eating convenience items such as instant mashed potatoes, boxed stuffing, prepared cranberry relishes and frozen pumpkin pie. This year, let's go back to the roots, the earthy staples, of a sublime Thanksgiving feast: The homey comfort of mashed potatoes with a touch of sweet butter. The nutty flavor of dressing with a wisp of sage to scent the kitchen. Tart and tannic cranberries in many different forms.
FOOD
April 30, 1986 | By Sharon MacKenzie, Special to The Inquirer
A balanced meal is like a balanced life; it not only allows all elements to exist happily together, preventing any single one from overwhelming any other, but it also fulfills every menu-planner's nutritional wish. Therefore, we offer this month a virtuous menu of equalized tastes, from rich to spiced to mild to sweet, with an added bit of textured sharpness to lend accent to the whole. Four people will enjoy these wholesome foods, the ingredients of which can all be bought in local supermarkets.
FOOD
March 17, 1993 | By Ethel Hofman, FOR THE INQUIRER
There's a strong possibility that the price of a head of lettuce could go as high as $2, as a result of recent floods in southwestern Arizona that damaged more that 20,000 acres of cropland. Because Arizona is a main winter supply source, lettuce prices have been skyocketing and probably will continue to do so until early-spring lettuce from California arrives in the markets. You can avoid the high prices and at the same time easily achieve the "strive for 5" servings of fresh produce recommended by health experts by picking up on a variety of other vegetables and fruits.
FOOD
March 20, 1991 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Parents sometimes warn their children that if they don't eat their vegetables, there will be no dessert. With The Essential Root Vegetable Cookbook (Clarkson Potter, $22.50), such admonitions become unnecessary. The recipes from this cookbook not only raise root vegetables to tempting main and side dishes, but show how to use them to make delicious desserts and snacks. Nearly 200 easy-to-follow recipes, from a custard dessert pudding made with carrots, to a tangy and smoky dish of barbecued potatoes in a garlic marinade, become the perfect accents to most any meal.
FOOD
March 2, 2006 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What's crunchy like a carrot, but not eaten raw? Not as sweet as its cousin, the rutabaga; not as starchy as its pal, the potato? Need another hint? It's black on the outside, white on the inside, and in recent months it's been showing up on all of the best menus in town. Martin Hamann, chef at the Four Seasons' Fountain Restaurant, even calls it the vegetable of the year. We're talking about salsify. And it's the new black. Also known as oyster plant or goat's beard (in Latin, Tragopogon porrifolius)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012
1 PARSNIPS This close cousin to carrots has a sweet, nutty flavor and a more nutritious punch, lots of vitamin K and 7 grams of fiber to boot. 2 DATES They may look ugly, but dates, especially Medjools, are one of the sweetest, most satisfying fruits. They contain calcium, sulfur, iron, potassium and magnesium. 3 STAR FRUIT A tropical, juicy fruit packed with vitamin C and a slimming 30 calories a serving. Give this good source of fiber a try as a garnish in your next fruit salad.
FOOD
February 2, 2012
This sturdy, streamlined ricer rests on the side of a mixing bowl as you easily press fruits and veggies, such as potatoes, carrots, parsnips, apples, into perfect purees.   - Ashley Primis OXO potato ricer, $19.99 at oxo.com.
FOOD
October 21, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
It was high time, I was notified over the weekend, to just cook the darn rabbit. He was taking up valuable freezer space, burrowed between the split-top hot dog buns and the stewed heirloom tomatoes of September. The rabbit was a Vermonter, purchased on our summer visit to West Glover. He was pink through the Cryovac; and as hard as tombstone granite. And he wasn't going easy into that pot. First, he set off a foraging expedition. Then he instigated a series of encounters that, in retrospect, appeared aimed at seasoning the cook, if not necessarily the cooked.
NEWS
September 23, 2007 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
PRINCETON - The creation of the Griggstown Quail Farm's blue-ribbon chicken potpie is a painstaking, three-day affair involving (on Day One) the roasting of hundreds of pounds of the farm's larger, fresh-killed chickens, (Day Two) the roasting of big trays of vegetables, including cremini mushrooms, fennel and spicy parsnips, and (Day Three) the assembly, for which a house-made chicken stock and two types of dough - a pliant bottom crust and buttery puff pastry - have been made and reserved.
FOOD
November 9, 2006 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Beef and parsnips are a surefire comfort- food combo that can be cooked fairly quickly if the roots are chopped. The rich flavor of the parsnips means you can bypass the butter or sour cream you might use on potatoes. And it can all be done in about half an hour. The recipe comes from In Great Taste: Fresh, Simple Recipes for Eating and Living Well (Rodale; $29.95), written by Evelyn H. Lauder to benefit the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, which she founded. Beef Tenderloin With Parsnip Mash Makes 4 servings 10 medium parsnips Pinch of kosher salt 1/2 cup nonfat (skim)
FOOD
March 2, 2006 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What's crunchy like a carrot, but not eaten raw? Not as sweet as its cousin, the rutabaga; not as starchy as its pal, the potato? Need another hint? It's black on the outside, white on the inside, and in recent months it's been showing up on all of the best menus in town. Martin Hamann, chef at the Four Seasons' Fountain Restaurant, even calls it the vegetable of the year. We're talking about salsify. And it's the new black. Also known as oyster plant or goat's beard (in Latin, Tragopogon porrifolius)
FOOD
April 3, 1994 | By Leslie Land, FOR THE INQUIRER
The Easter ham and the Thanksgiving turkey have little in common nutritionally, but from the gastronomic point of view they have one great, overriding similarity: Both are much more interesting as leftovers than in the original. Ham, especially, is hard to take as a mighty slab, but wonderful used as a seasoning. From the chunks that go with the pasta and peas to the hambone in the bean soup, just a little bit is enough to say to the tastebuds: meat in here, full meal. No other protein except maybe cheese has a wider range of comfortable companions.
FOOD
March 17, 1993 | By Ethel Hofman, FOR THE INQUIRER
There's a strong possibility that the price of a head of lettuce could go as high as $2, as a result of recent floods in southwestern Arizona that damaged more that 20,000 acres of cropland. Because Arizona is a main winter supply source, lettuce prices have been skyocketing and probably will continue to do so until early-spring lettuce from California arrives in the markets. You can avoid the high prices and at the same time easily achieve the "strive for 5" servings of fresh produce recommended by health experts by picking up on a variety of other vegetables and fruits.
FOOD
November 18, 1992 | By Mimmy Schmidt, FOR THE INQUIRER
Thanksgiving always seems to be upon us before we get the chance to really plan it. So we end up eating convenience items such as instant mashed potatoes, boxed stuffing, prepared cranberry relishes and frozen pumpkin pie. This year, let's go back to the roots, the earthy staples, of a sublime Thanksgiving feast: The homey comfort of mashed potatoes with a touch of sweet butter. The nutty flavor of dressing with a wisp of sage to scent the kitchen. Tart and tannic cranberries in many different forms.
FOOD
March 20, 1991 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Parents sometimes warn their children that if they don't eat their vegetables, there will be no dessert. With The Essential Root Vegetable Cookbook (Clarkson Potter, $22.50), such admonitions become unnecessary. The recipes from this cookbook not only raise root vegetables to tempting main and side dishes, but show how to use them to make delicious desserts and snacks. Nearly 200 easy-to-follow recipes, from a custard dessert pudding made with carrots, to a tangy and smoky dish of barbecued potatoes in a garlic marinade, become the perfect accents to most any meal.
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