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NEWS
January 31, 1993 | By Thomas Hine, INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
You don't find books about the riddle of the Parthenon on airport book racks. Nobody believes it was built by visitors from outer space. Unlike the pyramids of Egypt or Mesoamerica, it is a building that seems profoundly human. Its form - a gabled rectangle surrounded by columns - seems simple and obvious though it becomes transcendent through its proportions and its relationship to its site. The Parthenon is the single most familiar image of ancient Greek civilization, one of whose legacies is the confidence that through inquiry and reasoning, things can be understood.
NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By James Romm
Greek opinion is divided over the government's plan to offer the Parthenon and other heritage sites as film and photo backdrops to raise revenue during the country's current economic crisis. "This is sacrilege!" one Greek tour guide protested. But others thought that, humbling though the measure might be, it was at least better than begging for foreign bailouts. For some Greeks, the debate may have evoked a sense of deja vu. Pericles, the great Athenian statesman, also proposed raiding the Parthenon to meet a shortfall nearly 2,500 years ago - challenging the boundaries not just of good taste but of religious taboo.
SPORTS
August 26, 2010 | by Andre Iguodala
  -- I THOUGHT IN (yesterday's) game (against Greece in Athens) we played really well. We got off to a good start, and our defense was really clicking. I think we held them to just one field goal in the first 6 minutes, or something like that. This was our best defensive game by far. We have really come together as a team since we first got together in Las Vegas and have gotten a lot better, especially defensively. I think the reason is because we are getting more acclimated with each other.
TRAVEL
December 21, 2014 | By Jonathan Ma, For The Inquirer
Graffiti crawl up exterior walls like webs of ivy, bending and twisting around rows of shuttered windows. At some street corners, layers of posters pile unevenly over this graffiti like papier mâché, stitching together urban blocks. When I traveled to Greece this year, my original itinerary focused on ancient history sites: the Parthenon, the National Archaeological Museum, and the Agora. These places all tell valuable Greek stories from centuries past through classical busts, orderly columns, and symmetrical ruins.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1992 | By Andy Wickstrom, FOR THE INQUIRER
One minute you're surveying the Grand Canyon, and the next you're touring a ruined temple in Egypt. Then you're perching next to a gargoyle at Notre Dame peering at the traffic far below, and now you're hovering over a swarm of humanity at Grand Central Terminal. These sights, and more than 50 others, stream before us in the extraordinary documentary Chronos (40 minutes, $19.95), released by Miramar and distributed to stores by BMG. The sequence of natural and man-made wonders, filmed in eight countries, constitutes a god's-eye view of the Western world.
NEWS
August 18, 2002 | By Sherri R. Tracinski
As both an architect and architectural historian - that is, as someone who cares about buildings nearly as much as I care about my friends and family - I felt like I lost an old friend on Sept. 11, when the towers of the World Trade Center crumbled to the ground. While the nation mourned the thousands of people who died that day, I also mourned for the two buildings that died. I could not write about rebuilding the towers until the site was completely cleared; one would never discuss settling the estate until after the funeral.
SPORTS
August 14, 2004 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a rustic rooftop restaurant in Athens' Thiseion district. The food, from the sweet-feta bruschetta, to the creamy risotto, to the salmon in a tangy yogurt sauce, was superb. So was the view, the Parthenon glowing like some nearby constellation on its hilltop pedestal high above the dark city. It was the kind of scene that could make a visitor here drunk with delight. Still, I'm blaming the 1 1/2 bottles of wine. Play money. It's a little difficult deciphering the Greek economy.
FOOD
August 19, 1992 | By Marc Schogol, with reports from Inquirer wire services
VEGETATING IN OFFICE You should have eaten your broccoli, Mr. President. The National Broccoli Party has endorsed another Bush for president - Barbara - and chosen Bill Clinton as her running mate. Warren Brice, the party chairman - and also the special projects chairman for the Houston Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Association - says he hopes the ticket draws attention to the need for Americans to eat more fruit and vegetables. That, of course, includes broccoli, for which President Bush has a well-documented distaste.
NEWS
March 28, 1994 | BY MOLLY IVINS
Here in the Athens of the South is a full-scale replica of the Parthenon, ever so much better than the real one on account of (a) it's not falling apart and (b) you don't have to climb to get to it. Besides, it's not far from the Museum of Beverage Containers or the Museum of Tobacco Art. My favorite fact about the Parthenon of Nashville is that when the city dedicated the statue of Pallas Athena that now graces it (The younger sister of a college classmate of mine was the model for Athena.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 24, 2015
ATHENS, Greece - After a long, but too short, holiday in Greece, I came home changed, and not just by Grecian Formula. I enjoyed a period of introspection and reflection in a nation that gave the world democracy, philosophy, the Olympics, Aristotle, Plato, tzatziki and baklava. After sitting at the Parthenon for hours, then cruising the myth-laden Greek Islands for days, I realized that so much of what I am is rooted here. So I use this forum to announce - move over George Stephanopoulos and Jennifer Aniston - I identify as Greek and wish to be regarded as Greek.
TRAVEL
December 21, 2014 | By Jonathan Ma, For The Inquirer
Graffiti crawl up exterior walls like webs of ivy, bending and twisting around rows of shuttered windows. At some street corners, layers of posters pile unevenly over this graffiti like papier mâché, stitching together urban blocks. When I traveled to Greece this year, my original itinerary focused on ancient history sites: the Parthenon, the National Archaeological Museum, and the Agora. These places all tell valuable Greek stories from centuries past through classical busts, orderly columns, and symmetrical ruins.
NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By James Romm
Greek opinion is divided over the government's plan to offer the Parthenon and other heritage sites as film and photo backdrops to raise revenue during the country's current economic crisis. "This is sacrilege!" one Greek tour guide protested. But others thought that, humbling though the measure might be, it was at least better than begging for foreign bailouts. For some Greeks, the debate may have evoked a sense of deja vu. Pericles, the great Athenian statesman, also proposed raiding the Parthenon to meet a shortfall nearly 2,500 years ago - challenging the boundaries not just of good taste but of religious taboo.
SPORTS
August 26, 2010 | by Andre Iguodala
  -- I THOUGHT IN (yesterday's) game (against Greece in Athens) we played really well. We got off to a good start, and our defense was really clicking. I think we held them to just one field goal in the first 6 minutes, or something like that. This was our best defensive game by far. We have really come together as a team since we first got together in Las Vegas and have gotten a lot better, especially defensively. I think the reason is because we are getting more acclimated with each other.
NEWS
January 3, 2005 | By Arthur Michelson
American middle school students don't much care that they're worse at math than their counterparts in Hong Kong and Finland. "I don't need it," my students say. "I'm gonna be a basketball star. " Or a beautician, or a car mechanic, or a singer. It's also hard to get much of a rise out of adults over the fact, released last year, that the United States ranked 28th out of 41 countries whose middle school students' math skills were tested by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.
SPORTS
August 15, 2004 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a rustic rooftop restaurant in Athens' Thiseion district. The food, from the sweet-feta bruschetta, to the creamy risotto, to the salmon in a tangy yogurt sauce, was superb. So was the view, the Parthenon glowing like some nearby constellation on its hilltop pedestal high above the dark city. It was the kind of scene that could make a visitor here drunk with delight. Still, I'm blaming the 1 1/2 bottles of wine. Play money. It's a little difficult deciphering the Greek economy.
NEWS
August 18, 2002 | By Sherri R. Tracinski
As both an architect and architectural historian - that is, as someone who cares about buildings nearly as much as I care about my friends and family - I felt like I lost an old friend on Sept. 11, when the towers of the World Trade Center crumbled to the ground. While the nation mourned the thousands of people who died that day, I also mourned for the two buildings that died. I could not write about rebuilding the towers until the site was completely cleared; one would never discuss settling the estate until after the funeral.
NEWS
October 3, 1999 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Vernon, a cruise veteran from Texas whose last name I never learned, gave me the lowdown: "Some cruises are for relaxing. Some are for seeing things. "This one is definitely for seeing things. " Vernon delivered this brief cruise philosophy as we sat outside a roadside cafe in Corinth, Greece. We had just gotten off a tour bus to gape at the century-old Corinth canal, an engineering marvel that connects the Saronic Gulf and Aegean Sea, and were taking a 10-minute break before proceeding to the vast Roman ruins a few miles away.
NEWS
June 1, 1999 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend your ears to Julia Gaisser. She will assure you that, while Caesar may be dead, the civilization that spawned him is alive in the 20th century, teaching, delighting, and providing the foundation for a fine liberal arts education. The same goes for the culture that built the Parthenon and produced Sophocles, says Gaisser, a classical studies professor at Bryn Mawr College. While the study of ancient Greece and Rome may be regarded as obsolete these days and has been cut from many a high school and college curriculum, it can actually give the intellect a good workout, Gaisser asserted.
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