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Partial Verdict

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NEWS
November 21, 1987 | By Jane Cope, Special to The Inquirer
On Tuesday morning, attorneys, court personnel and spectators will return to the sixth floor of Burlington County Courthouse in Mount Holly, where the 12 jurors will try again to reach a verdict in the murder trial of admitted heroin dealer Roland Bartlett. Superior Court Judge Paul R. Kramer refused yesterday to accept a partial verdict from the jury and asked that the panel come back and "give it one more try. " Bartlett, 42, now of Cherry Hill, is accused of having ordered the fatal shooting of a Willingboro neighbor, Edward L. Atwood, 37, of Marboro Lane.
NEWS
July 1, 2004 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an unusual partial verdict, a federal jury yesterday handed a limited victory to former QVC host Gwen Owens, finding that she was paid less because of her gender and awarding her back pay of $67,537. The nine-member jury gave the larger win to the cable shopping channel, determining that QVC managers did not purposefully discriminate against Owens in her on-air assignments because she is African American, discriminate in her pay because of gender, or retaliate against her for suing them.
NEWS
May 7, 2005 | By John Shiffman and Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The jury in the City Hall corruption trial sent more messages yesterday - but it was difficult to know if this signaled a possible deadlock on all counts, or just disagreement on one or more. For a few hours during the jury's 18th day of deliberation, a verdict appeared imminent - even the judge said so from the bench in federal court in Philadelphia. But by day's end, jurors adjourned again until Monday. The jury generated the flurry of expectation with a morning query that was followed by in-court remarks by the foreman, who tried to clarify the jury's question.
NEWS
June 30, 2004 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After five full days of deliberations, a federal civil jury announced yesterday that it was deadlocked on a key claim in the race discrimination and retaliation case against QVC by former host Gwen Owens. The nine jurors - reduced by one from the 10 at the trial's start - contacted U.S. District Judge Eduardo C. Robreno at noon, saying they could not return a unanimous verdict on the second liability question on the verdict form: whether Owens was fired in 1998 because she is African American.
NEWS
March 5, 1993 | By Maureen Graham and Larry Lewis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The jury in Leonard Tose's suit against the Sands Hotel Casino reached a partial verdict yesterday and is to resume its work this morning. Without revealing their decision, the jurors reported that they had agreed on whether the former Eagles owner was drunk while he was gambling at the Sands on four of the seven dates in question. The nine-member panel said it had not been able to agree on the three other dates. The news, delivered to U.S. District Judge Joseph Irenas late yesterday afternoon, sparked concern that the proceedings, which have lasted nearly two weeks, could end in a mistrial.
NEWS
January 29, 2005 | By John Shiffman and Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A federal jury delivered a partial verdict yesterday in the first City Hall corruption case to go to trial, acquitting an investment banker of lying to the FBI about why he lent his vacation condo to the then-city treasurer. But jurors adjourned without reaching a verdict on the other charge against Denis J. Carlson - that he lied to FBI agents when he said he did not believe that lawyer Ronald A. White had influence in the Street administration. U.S. District Judge Michael M. Baylson ordered the jury to return Monday to resume deliberations on the count related to White.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Former high-flying stock speculator John Mulheren Jr. was found guilty yesterday of four counts of securities fraud and conspiracy for helping Ivan Boesky manipulate stock prices in exchange for inside information. The jury remained deadlocked on 26 other charges. U.S. District Judge Miriam Cedarbaum accepted the partial verdict and sent the jury back to deliberate on the other charges. The trial involves Boesky's first public testimony against anyone he has implicated in the government's long investigation of insider trading.
NEWS
March 29, 1996 | by Marisol Bello, Daily News Staff Writer
The ex-cop was a victim, attacked by an overzealous Juniata Park couple fighting to rid their block of prostitutes, the defense lawyer argued. The prosecution had a different view: He's a pervert who was having sex with a male hitchiker and he knocked the couple around because they threatened to expose him. Yesterday, Municipal Judge Lydia Kirkland found Thomas Collins guilty of simple assault for slapping Eileen Donnelly when she and her husband...
NEWS
June 14, 1989 | By Connie O'Kane, Special to The Inquirer
A mistrial was declared yesterday in the case of a Pemberton Township youth accused of murdering a part-time watchman after a Burlington County jury failed to reach a decision on several charges lodged against the suspect. Superior Court Judge Cornelius P. Sullivan declared a mistrial after jurors informed him that they were unable to agree on two of the charges against the defendant, Joseph C. Slover. On the advice of both prosecution and defense attorneys, Sullivan decided not to take a partial verdict from the jury.
NEWS
September 6, 1989 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal court jury yesterday convicted a Philadelphia man for his role in four suburban bank robberies but acquitted him of taking part in 11 others. With its membership reduced to 11 - the son of one juror became ill, preventing her from returning to deliberate - the jury worked about six hours before returning the partial verdict against Robert Brant. The jury is to resume deliberations today on the charges against Brant's co-defendant, Arthur V. Snead. Snead, 58, a former Frankford furniture dealer, and Brant, 44, a Kensington handyman and a disc jockey at a neighborhood tavern, were indicted on conspiracy to commit armed bank robbery, 12 counts of bank robbery and 12 counts of armed bank robbery in connection with 15 suburban bank robberies between July 7, 1988, and Feb. 22 that prosecutors say netted them a total of $312,526.
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NEWS
January 19, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
IT SEEMED that yesterday would be the end to the racketeering retrial of reputed Philly mob boss Joseph Ligambi and his nephew George Borgesi. Jurors were working diligently, and the long Martin Luther King Jr. holiday weekend was approaching. But then word filtered into the courtroom hallway about 11 a.m. that the panel of 11 women and one man were unanimous on two counts, hung on the rest. Relatives of Ligambi, 74, and onetime Philly mob consigliere Borgesi, 50, seemed nervous while waiting in the courtroom.
NEWS
January 19, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Another impasse. Another illness. Such was the seventh day of deliberations in the federal racketeering retrial of reputed Philadelphia mob boss Joseph Ligambi and his nephew George Borgesi. Just before 10:30 a.m. Friday, jurors sent U.S. District Judge Eduardo Robreno a note indicating that they had reached unanimity on two of the five counts against the mob figures. They didn't say which ones. As for the other three, there remained "a firm difference of opinion," they said.
NEWS
December 21, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA After five weeks of testimony about phantom board members, fabricated documents, and forged signatures, the federal jury in the Dorothy June Brown charter-school fraud trial acquitted her two codefendants Thursday and indicated it was divided on the charges against Brown. In a partial verdict after more than five days of deliberations, the jury said it had not reached agreement on any of the 60 counts against the 76-year-old Brown, who is accused of defrauding the four charter schools she founded of $6.7 million, and participating in a scheme to cover it up. But the panel of nine women and three men acquitted her codefendants of conspiracy and obstruction of justice in connection with the alleged cover-up.
NEWS
November 28, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Two former Philadelphia police officers were found guilty of reckless endangerment Tuesday in the fatal shooting of a West Oak Lane man during a dispute over a stolen pizza. The Common Pleas Court jury of eight women and four men had deliberated for about 16 hours since Friday before finding former Sgt. Chauncey Ellison and ex-Officer Robin Fortune guilty of the misdemeanor endangerment count in the 2008 death of 20-year-old Lawrence Allen. But the jurors said they were deadlocked on the most serious charge - voluntary manslaughter - against Ellison for shooting Allen as well as a count of conspiracy to commit reckless endangerment against Fortune.
NEWS
February 7, 2013 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge declared a mistrial Tuesday in the trial of reputed Philadelphia mob boss Joseph Ligambi after jurors acquitted him on five counts but said they were hopelessly deadlocked on four others, including the key charge of racketeering conspiracy. Three codefendants, including alleged underboss Joseph "Mousie" Massimino, were convicted on the conspiracy charge and face years in prison. But jurors found them and the others not guilty of 45 counts of bookmaking, extortion, loan-sharking, and other crimes.
NEWS
February 6, 2013 | By John P. Martin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A judge declared a mistrial Tuesday in the trial of reputed Philadelphia mob boss Joseph Ligambi, after jurors acquitted him on five counts but said they were hopelessly deadlocked on four others, including the key charge of racketeering conspiracy. Three codefendants, including alleged underboss Joseph "Mousie" Massimino, were convicted on the conspiracy charge and face years in prison. But jurors found them and the others not guilty of 45 counts of bookmaking, extortion, loan-sharking and other crimes.
NEWS
November 19, 2005 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jurors announced yesterday that they had reached partial verdicts in the case of a marijuana grower charged in the deaths of two firefighters, but disagreed about some of the crimes charged. The jury of six men and six women asked to recess midafternoon and continue their deliberations Monday. Daniel Brough, 37, of Port Richmond, has pleaded not guilty to two counts of third-degree murder, causing a catastrophe, and drug possession with intent to deliver. He is free on $150,000 bail.
NEWS
May 7, 2005 | By John Shiffman and Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The jury in the City Hall corruption trial sent more messages yesterday - but it was difficult to know if this signaled a possible deadlock on all counts, or just disagreement on one or more. For a few hours during the jury's 18th day of deliberation, a verdict appeared imminent - even the judge said so from the bench in federal court in Philadelphia. But by day's end, jurors adjourned again until Monday. The jury generated the flurry of expectation with a morning query that was followed by in-court remarks by the foreman, who tried to clarify the jury's question.
NEWS
January 29, 2005 | By John Shiffman and Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A federal jury delivered a partial verdict yesterday in the first City Hall corruption case to go to trial, acquitting an investment banker of lying to the FBI about why he lent his vacation condo to the then-city treasurer. But jurors adjourned without reaching a verdict on the other charge against Denis J. Carlson - that he lied to FBI agents when he said he did not believe that lawyer Ronald A. White had influence in the Street administration. U.S. District Judge Michael M. Baylson ordered the jury to return Monday to resume deliberations on the count related to White.
NEWS
July 1, 2004 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an unusual partial verdict, a federal jury yesterday handed a limited victory to former QVC host Gwen Owens, finding that she was paid less because of her gender and awarding her back pay of $67,537. The nine-member jury gave the larger win to the cable shopping channel, determining that QVC managers did not purposefully discriminate against Owens in her on-air assignments because she is African American, discriminate in her pay because of gender, or retaliate against her for suing them.
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