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Particle

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NEWS
January 9, 2012
By David Kaiser Fifty years ago, particle physicists faced an unexpected challenge. Their best mathematical models could account for some of the natural forces that explain the structure and behavior of matter at a fundamental level, such as electromagnetism and the weak nuclear force responsible for radioactive decay. But the models worked only if the particles inside of atoms had no mass. How could huge conglomerations of such particles - proteins, people, planets - behave as they do if their constituent parts weighed nothing at all?
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By John Heilprin, Associated Press
GENEVA, Switzerland - The search is all but over for a subatomic particle that is a crucial building block of the universe. Physicists announced Thursday that they believe they had confirmed discovery of the particle, which will go a long way toward explaining what gives electrons and all matter in the universe size and shape. The elusive particle, called a Higgs boson, was predicted in 1964 to help fill in our understanding of the creation of the universe, which many theorize occurred in a massive explosion known as the big bang.
NEWS
July 10, 2012 | by Sandra Shea
WHAT DOES IT mean that the biggest news story in the world — last week's announcement that scientists have confirmed the existence of the Higgs boson, the "God particle" — was probably understood by .?.?. pretty much no one? The discovery is being hailed as game-changer in how we understand the universe. Of course by "we," we mean those people who devote their lives to physics or science. The rest of us either don't care or are interested but too embarrassed to admit that we never even took chemistry class, let alone physics.
LIVING
June 9, 2006 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: Can you tell me how to figure out how much paint I'll need to do the outside of my house? Answer: There's a standard way to calculate this: You must know the square footage of the area to be painted and how much a gallon of paint covers. A good rule of thumb for coverage is 400 square feet per gallon, though in my experience certain brands (Behr, for instance) cover better than others. But with special paints designed for exterior stucco surfaces, you'll get less than 400 square feet of coverage to the gallon because the paint goes on thicker, to get into all the crannies.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Imagine a particle 1/10,000 of a cross-section of a human hair. That's the size of a protein, way smaller than a cell. Bernardo Cordovez, 29, and his partners have come up with something they call a NanoTweezer that allows them to pick up and move that kind of teeny-tiny particle using a laser beam of light. There's been a lot of talk about trying to bring high-tech, high-potential businesses to Philadelphia, and the story behind how Cordovez's very small company, Optofluidics Inc., landed here provides an object lesson.
NEWS
September 23, 2011 | By Frank Jordans and Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
GENEVA, Switzerland - One of the very pillars of physics and Einstein's theory of relativity - that nothing can go faster than the speed of light - was rocked Thursday by new findings from one of the world's foremost laboratories. European researchers said they clocked an oddball type of subatomic particle called a neutrino going faster than the 186,282 miles per second that has long been considered the cosmic speed limit. The assertion was met with skepticism, with one outside physicist calling it the equivalent of saying you have a flying carpet.
NEWS
April 11, 2011 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
WHEN IT COMES to scientific disciplines, studying avalanches would be hard to categorize.' But that was Nicholas DiGiacomo's favorite preoccupation. And he was in the perfect place to observe the scary phenomenon - the mountains of Colorado. Nick, whose day jobs involved nuclear physics, antimatter, particle colliders and his service as a science adviser to President Ronald Reagan, died March 9 of complications of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's Disease). He was 58 and lived in Telluride, Colo.
NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By Juliet Eilperin, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The Environmental Protection Agency will announce a proposal Friday to tighten the nation's soot standards, a move that could help deliver major health benefits by the end of the decade but force some oil refiners, manufacturers, and other operations to invest in pollution-abatement upgrades. Particle pollution measuring less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter, also known as fine particles or soot, is possibly the most deadly widespread air pollutant. Measuring one-thirtieth the width of a human hair, these particles come from activities ranging from wood-burning to vehicle emissions and can cause respiratory and heart ailments by entering the lungs and bloodstream.
LIVING
October 3, 1995 | By Tanya Barrientos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You've hung in there for 10 months with Georgia O'Keeffe. You've patiently flipped through most of Monet's water lilies. And, be honest now, sometime in late July you lost empathy for those endangered species romping through their disappearing habitats. That 1995 calendar hanging on your wall just doesn't have the same impact it did back in January, when you decided this was the year you'd seriously heed each of the 365 daily inspirational messages from your personal angel guide.
NEWS
July 19, 2010 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
Princeton University proclaimed this month that some of its physicists had helped discover an invisible particle known as a geoneutrino. A geoneutrino is, it turns out, a particularly elusive type of an already elusive class of particles - neutrinos - most famous for inspiring John Updike to write a poem with the lines: "The earth is just a silly ball / To them, through which they simply pass. " Which is accurate, though one neutrino in billions will hit something and leave a signal.
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NEWS
March 21, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
WHEN you lose your keys, you know you'll probably find them in your other pants. Lose the key to proving that all known matter is symmetrical and stable, and you're in bigger trouble, as someone may have left that key in another universe. So we learn in the absorbing documentary "Particle Fever," about physicists, the Large Hadron Collider and the search for the so-called God particle, the theoretical missing piece of matter that would verify modern theories about forces that created the universe, and bind matter together.
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By John Heilprin, Associated Press
GENEVA, Switzerland - The search is all but over for a subatomic particle that is a crucial building block of the universe. Physicists announced Thursday that they believe they had confirmed discovery of the particle, which will go a long way toward explaining what gives electrons and all matter in the universe size and shape. The elusive particle, called a Higgs boson, was predicted in 1964 to help fill in our understanding of the creation of the universe, which many theorize occurred in a massive explosion known as the big bang.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | BY SANDY BAUERS, Inquirer Staff Writer
IT'S A SMOGGY SUMMER DAY. The air feels thick. Most people know their lungs might suffer on such days. But increasingly, medical researchers are seeing harmful effects from air pollution on the heart, as well. "Inhaling a heart attack" is how one publication put it. Air pollution has both short- and long-term effects that can injure the heart and blood vessels, causing or exacerbating strokes, congestive heart failure, clogged arteries and other problems, research has shown.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Imagine a particle 1/10,000 of a cross-section of a human hair. That's the size of a protein, way smaller than a cell. Bernardo Cordovez, 29, and his partners have come up with something they call a NanoTweezer that allows them to pick up and move that kind of teeny-tiny particle using a laser beam of light. There's been a lot of talk about trying to bring high-tech, high-potential businesses to Philadelphia, and the story behind how Cordovez's very small company, Optofluidics Inc., landed here provides an object lesson.
NEWS
October 28, 2012
Sunday Cage festival Composer John Cage is most famous for his conceptual 1952 piece 4'33" - which consisted of performers sitting quietly for that length of time - but he left a legacy of music with sound that was vastly influential in its use of chance creation, electronics, and physically altered instrumentation. The presenting organization Bowerbird has put together a citywide celebration of Cage that runs in three parts from October to January, and features many of Cage's first interpreters.
NEWS
August 11, 2012
HARRISBURG - The Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board announced a voluntary recall of some lots of 1800 brand tequila because of the potential presence of glass particles in the bottles. The recalled bottles are 1.75 liter Silver, Reposado, and Coconut. All other size bottles, as well as 1800 Tequila Anejo, Select Silver, and 1800 Ultimate Margarita, are not affected. According to the manufacturer, Agavera Camichines S.A. de C.V., the glass stoppers may have been damaged during transport and while no injuries have been reported, the presence of small particles of glass could pose a health risk.
NEWS
July 10, 2012 | by Sandra Shea
WHAT DOES IT mean that the biggest news story in the world — last week's announcement that scientists have confirmed the existence of the Higgs boson, the "God particle" — was probably understood by .?.?. pretty much no one? The discovery is being hailed as game-changer in how we understand the universe. Of course by "we," we mean those people who devote their lives to physics or science. The rest of us either don't care or are interested but too embarrassed to admit that we never even took chemistry class, let alone physics.
NEWS
July 5, 2012 | By John Heilprin, Associated Press
GENEVA, Switzerland - Scientists at the world's biggest atom smasher hailed the discovery of "the missing cornerstone of physics" Wednesday, cheering the apparent end of a decades-long quest for a new subatomic particle called the Higgs boson, or "God particle," which could help explain why all matter has mass and crack open a new realm of subatomic science. First proposed as a theory in the 1960s, the maddeningly elusive Higgs had been hunted by at least two generations of physicists who believed it would help shape our understanding of how the universe began and how its most elemental pieces fit together.
NEWS
July 3, 2012 | By John Heilprin and Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
GENEVA, Switzerland - Scientists working at the world's biggest atom smasher plan to announce Wednesday that they have gathered enough evidence to show that the long-sought particle that may answer fundamental questions about the universe almost certainly does exist. But after decades of work and billions of dollars spent, researchers at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) aren't quite ready to say they've "discovered" the particle. A number of Philadelphia-area scientists have spent years on the hunt, including contingents from Princeton and Rutgers Universities.
NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By Juliet Eilperin, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The Environmental Protection Agency will announce a proposal Friday to tighten the nation's soot standards, a move that could help deliver major health benefits by the end of the decade but force some oil refiners, manufacturers, and other operations to invest in pollution-abatement upgrades. Particle pollution measuring less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter, also known as fine particles or soot, is possibly the most deadly widespread air pollutant. Measuring one-thirtieth the width of a human hair, these particles come from activities ranging from wood-burning to vehicle emissions and can cause respiratory and heart ailments by entering the lungs and bloodstream.
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