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Partisanship

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NEWS
May 29, 2013
Chilly weather aside, most of the Jersey Shore's towns were back in business for the Memorial Day weekend, which was capped by another joint appearance of President Obama and Gov. Christie on Tuesday. Those who would criticize the "bromance" between the Democratic president and the Republican governor should consider that this is what it looks like when politicians do their jobs. Their cooperation after Hurricane Sandy has shown how working together can bring about results. Boardwalks can be rebuilt; homes and businesses restored.
NEWS
September 18, 2003
The decision by an all-Democratic federal appeals court panel to postpone California's gubernatorial recall election comes across as thinly veiled partisanship from a supposedly apolitical branch of government. The three-judge panel (including two Clinton appointees) decided to delay the recall election until spring because six counties still use those problematic paper ballots. The court relied on an expert who said these older voting machines might not tally properly a small percentage of votes, mostly in areas with large minority (i.e.
NEWS
April 16, 1989 | By JEFF GREENFIELD
As House Speaker Jim Wright launched his defense of his job, his reputation and his wife's honor, his Democratic colleagues were fanning out to forward positions on Washington-area TV stations to intone the official mantra: "Partisanship! Partisanship!" The assault on Speaker Wright, they claimed, was nothing more than a naked attempt by the Republican House minority to gain (gasp!) political advantage from the speaker's reported ethical woes. As they waited for their makeup to dry, these Democrats might well have found the remnants of the last gallant brigade of politicians to assault the electronic media on behalf of a beleaguered ally: all those Republican senators who just a few weeks ago were defending John Tower with the cry of "Partisanship!
NEWS
July 20, 2013 | By Ben Finley and Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writers
U.S. Rep. Mike Fitzpatrick (R., Pa.) joined a bipartisan group of lawmakers Thursday in Washington to push a package of bills intended to help break congressional gridlock. The eight proposals draw a bead on government waste, providing legislation that attracts members of both parties. Fitzpatrick's bill, for instance, aims to cut federal agencies' travel expenses through videoconferencing. Another measure would merge electronic health records between the Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs.
NEWS
November 13, 2002 | By E.J. Dionne Jr
There are good recriminations and bad recriminations. Good recriminations entail an honest, if painful, assessment of what went wrong. Bad recriminations happen when factions use defeat to score the same tired points against their rivals that they were trying to score before a single vote was counted. Bad recriminators strengthen factions. Good recriminators build parties and movements. Very little of what went wrong for the Democrats in the 2002 election can be explained by the old center vs. left faction fights that have roiled the party since the 1980s.
NEWS
September 7, 2002 | By James Kuhnhenn INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Nearly a year ago, as the World Trade Center collapsed behind them, 250 New Yorkers fled down Wall Street and found uneasy refuge at the site where the first U.S. Congress convened in 1789. Yesterday, 301 members of the 107th Congress found uneasy refuge from partisanship at the same site - the Federal Hall National Memorial - where they commemorated the Sept. 11 attack. If the dominant sound a year ago in Lower Manhattan was the roar of destruction, yesterday's sweet and soaring choral voices, Wynton Marsalis' haunting trumpet, and a Bach flute solo offered a soothing contrast.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Item: House Speaker Jim Wright of Texas announces his resignation after being charged with 69 instances of financial improprieties. Item: Rep. Tony Coelho of California, the number-three House Democrat, says he will resign after reports of his involvement in a controversial junk-bond deal. Item: Rep. Donald E. Lukens, a 58-year-old Ohio Republican, is found guilty of having sex with a 16-year-old girl. Item: Rep. Robert W. Davis, a Michigan Republican, says hiring his girlfriend for a committee staff job was ethically sound.
NEWS
September 26, 2008 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Until a group of House Republicans rose up late yesterday against a proposed rescue plan for Wall Street, negotiations between Congress and the White House did not seem to be politics as usual. Only a few days ago, as financial markets went through the floor, Washington geared up for another round of political theater. Outrage was voiced, demands were made, and lines were drawn in the sand. But underlying early posturing as Congress wrestled with how to revive the nearly blown engine of American capitalism was a palpable feeling of dread among lawmakers.
NEWS
August 13, 1998 | By Linda Chavez
Last week, the House committee investigating illegal campaign contributions voted along strict party lines to cite Attorney General Janet Reno for contempt of Congress. The action was prompted by her refusal to turn over subpoenaed documents from the Justice Department's own chief investigator Charles LaBella, who recommended that she appoint an independent counsel to investigate administration and Democratic Party officials for possible criminal violations of campaign-finance laws.
NEWS
December 23, 1986
Your Dec. 15 editorial about NBC president Robert D. Wright's urging employees to contribute to an NBC political action committee said: "Dumb policy, Mr. Wright. Dumber memo. " Your reason? That "journalistic credibility requires an ethos of independence - especially from political partisanship - that unfortunately is often foreign to bottom-line obsessives. " Considering The Inquirer's credibility in that light, your paper's editorials often (and your treatment of news) seem to me to reflect a rather definite political slant and bias.
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NEWS
March 13, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Americans of a certain age may remember the 1970s-era TV commercial that depicted two kids trying to entice their baby brother, "Mikey," into doing something they didn't have the stomach for - tasting a new Quaker Oats cereal called Life. In a similar fashion, it seems, Senate Republicans persuaded their freshman colleague Tom Cotton of Arkansas to write something they didn't want to take credit for. Thus Cotton penned a letter to the leaders of Iran suggesting they ignore the president of the United States as he tries to lead negotiations to limit the scope and pace of that nation's nuclear program.
NEWS
October 1, 2013
Jason Greenslate has become America's most prominent public figure who favors a do-rag and surfing slang since Caleb "Kai" McGillvary, the hitchhiking Internet hero turned New Jersey murder suspect. Greenslate's transgressions are less criminal than culinary: Fox News' cameras captured him buying supermarket sushi and lobster (albeit "on special," he noted) with his food-stamp card. Greenslate, a San Diego-area surfer and aspiring rock star with no dependents or identifiable means of support, told Fox that the government's willingness to subsidize his meals is "radical," in the colloquial sense.
NEWS
July 20, 2013 | By Ben Finley and Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writers
U.S. Rep. Mike Fitzpatrick (R., Pa.) joined a bipartisan group of lawmakers Thursday in Washington to push a package of bills intended to help break congressional gridlock. The eight proposals draw a bead on government waste, providing legislation that attracts members of both parties. Fitzpatrick's bill, for instance, aims to cut federal agencies' travel expenses through videoconferencing. Another measure would merge electronic health records between the Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By E. J. Dionne, For The Inquirer
Just when our politics seemed destined to freeze into a brain-dead brand of partisanship, party lines started cracking up. Start with the progress on two of this year's central issues, gun safety and immigration. It was unfortunate that talks between Sen. Tom Coburn (R., Okla.) and Senate advocates of universal background checks were suspended because Coburn can't quite get to yes. But the fact that Coburn and Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D., N.Y.) were negotiating at all, and stayed on cordial terms, means something.
NEWS
November 6, 2012
By Robin Lauermann We like to promote the value of voting. But that is not the primary purpose of democracy. Rather, it is to promote deliberation that produces broader perspectives and more considered answers to our problems. Exercising the rights of our representative democracy - voting, free speech, etc. - is valuable only inasmuch as it produces said deliberation. Alexis de Toqueville noted that "liberty is an arduous apprenticeship. " If you wish to assert your rights, you must respect the responsibilities that come with them.
NEWS
September 11, 2012 | BY EDWARD G. RENDELL
PARTISANSHIP in Washington is threatening to put the economy in recession at year's end, or else leave us with damaging levels of debt. Those are the options facing Washington if the two parties remain unwilling to come together and replace the so-called fiscal cliff with a thoughtful and gradual plan to put the debt on a more sustainable path. If we do nothing, a combination of blunt and immediate across-the-board spending cuts, dramatic tax-rate increases and other changes will throw the economy back into recession while slashing important investments, crippling our military capabilities and raising taxes on ordinary Americans.
NEWS
August 12, 2012 | By Michael Smerconish
Picture this: A conservative Republican chief justice is called upon to decide the fate of one of the most partisan issues of our time, and, surprisingly comes down on the Democratic side. Health care and John Roberts? Actually, I was thinking of voter ID and Pennsylvania Chief Justice Ron Castille. There is a plausible scenario whereby he will cast the deciding vote regarding the controversial new law. And while his brethren might rule along party lines, Castille has a history of flexing his independence.
NEWS
May 30, 2012 | Daily News Editorial
JUST A FEW WEEKS before the U.S. Supreme Court's hearings in March on the constitutionality of several parts of the Affordable Care Act — a/k/a Obamacare —an overwhelming majority of the nation's legal scholars predicted that the law would be upheld.   They saw little substantive difference between the health-care legislation and other social programs that have been passed without constitutional challenge since the court interpreted the Constitution's commerce clause as supporting Congress' power to pass New Deal legislation like Social Security and various economic and health and safety regulations.
NEWS
March 4, 2012
'We're not going to agree on every single issue," President Obama told the nation's governors at a black-tie dinner last Sunday night, but, "I'm confident that we're going to be able to find more and more common ground going forward. " Members of the National Governors Association returned to the White House Monday morning for a working session with Obama. "The thing that connects all of us," the president reminded them, "is that we know what it means to govern . . . and hopefully to forge some common ground.
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