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NEWS
September 14, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - "Police investigate break-in at Democratic Party headquarters. " For those of a certain age that headline may sound familiar. Only this time, almost 40 years after GOP operatives burglarized the Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate complex in Washington, the target was Pennsylvania state Democratic Party headquarters in Harrisburg. City police say on July 11, party officials reported someone had entered their eighth-floor downtown Harrisburg offices overnight and removed two laptops and a camcorder.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | By Shaun Stanert, Special to The Inquirer
The winner was grateful for his victory, the loser for a "learning experience. " Republican state Rep. Roy Reinard was elected to his fifth term from the 178th District, garnering more than 68 percent of the vote to beat Democrat Gilbert Ridley. In the district, which encompasses Northampton Township, Ivyland Borough and parts of Upper and Lower Southampton and Warminster Townships, the traditional Republican preference was glaringly apparent as early returns trickled in, even though the candidates had struck common themes.
NEWS
June 13, 1989 | By Carol D. Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
Still recuperating from last week's primary, Cherry Hill's Republican and Democratic camps gathered last night to tone and reshape their parties - starting with the top officers. In electing chairmen, the GOP unanimously reappointed its controversial leader, Michael Bristow, after a month of speculation about who might step forward to vie for the seat, while the Democrats unanimously chose Kevin Halpern, one of the four council candidates nominated in the primary. Camden County Democratic Party leaders announced Halpern's nomination the day after Tuesday's elections, but Bristow's claim to the top seat had been quietly disputed for several weeks.
NEWS
October 29, 1993 | By Nancy Phillips, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Critics say the Democratic Party has had too much influence in the day-to- day operations of Camden County's government. The Democrats deny it. But a set of 1992 telephone records from the office of Louis S. Bezich, the county's top administrator, show his office was in frequent contact with Democratic Party headquarters during working hours. In one month, the calls to party headquarters averaged more than one per working day. That month was February 1992, when county officials were dealing with a difficult budget and the prospect of more than 100 layoffs.
NEWS
February 5, 1988 | By Julia M. Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Bucks County GOP's executive committee last night overwhelmingly endorsed former state Sen. Edward L. Howard over two rivals for the Eighth Congressional District seat held by U.S. Rep. Peter H. Kostmayer (D., Pa.). In a vote taken at party headquarters in Doylestown, Howard, 61, of Doylestown, defeated former U.S. Rep. James K. Coyne and Langhorne Borough Councilman Henry F. Schickling. He received 64 votes, compared with nine for Coyne and five for Schickling. An earlier motion for an open primary lost by a 52-24 vote, after party Chairman Harry W. Fawkes backed down on an attempt to prevent six Montgomery County executive committee members from voting.
NEWS
July 26, 2012 | By Laura Burke, Associated Press
ACCRA, Ghana - Ghana's governing party vowed Wednesday to carry out the "unfinished job" of the country's late president as questions swirled about who would replace him on the ticket for December's election. John Atta Mills, who took power in 2009 after winning a presidential runoff vote by a razor-thin margin, died Tuesday at the age of 68. There was no immediate word on the cause of his death, though there had been rumors about a serious illness in recent months. Vice President John Mahama was sworn in late Tuesday only hours after Atta Mills passed away, underscoring the West African nation's stability in a part of the world where the deaths of other leaders have sparked coups.
NEWS
October 16, 1987 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
With fanfare and ceremony, the city's Democratic delegation to the state House and Senate convened yesterday at party headquarters in Philadelphia to endorse Mayor Goode for re-election and give him a public show of support. In most election years, it would not be necessary for Democrats to stage a news conference to say they backed an incumbent Democrat. But this is not most years. With Goode facing Republican Frank L. Rizzo, a former two-term Democratic mayor, Democrats have been tugged and pulled in two directions.
NEWS
October 31, 1992 | By Jayne Feld, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The official seal says Clayton is "a great place to live, pray, work and play. " Both Democratic and Republican council candidates say they want to preserve Clayton's small-town appeal as neighboring communities increasingly suburbanize. Candidates from both parties say attracting small businesses while controlling residental development is the biggest priority facing Clayton's leaders. And since party rivalries seldom flare up in this rural borough of 6,500, Democrats and Republicans say the election Tuesday is about personalities.
NEWS
June 6, 1995 | By Nancy Phillips, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two top leaders of the Camden County Democratic Party testified in court yesterday that they took $3,000 in cash from a campaign contributor in 1992, converted it into a check and deposited it in the party's account. State election law prohibits cash contributions of more than $200. The party officials, George E. Norcross 3d and Christopher T. Morris, said they believed they had complied with that law because they converted the cash into a check and had promptly reported the contribution to the state.
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NEWS
September 14, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - "Police investigate break-in at Democratic Party headquarters. " For those of a certain age that headline may sound familiar. Only this time, almost 40 years after GOP operatives burglarized the Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate complex in Washington, the target was Pennsylvania state Democratic Party headquarters in Harrisburg. City police say on July 11, party officials reported someone had entered their eighth-floor downtown Harrisburg offices overnight and removed two laptops and a camcorder.
NEWS
July 26, 2012 | By Laura Burke, Associated Press
ACCRA, Ghana - Ghana's governing party vowed Wednesday to carry out the "unfinished job" of the country's late president as questions swirled about who would replace him on the ticket for December's election. John Atta Mills, who took power in 2009 after winning a presidential runoff vote by a razor-thin margin, died Tuesday at the age of 68. There was no immediate word on the cause of his death, though there had been rumors about a serious illness in recent months. Vice President John Mahama was sworn in late Tuesday only hours after Atta Mills passed away, underscoring the West African nation's stability in a part of the world where the deaths of other leaders have sparked coups.
NEWS
September 24, 2004 | By Carrie Budoff INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The message to Philadelphia Democratic ward leaders packed inside party headquarters came across clearly: Don't even think about working for Republican U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter. Word had gotten around that Specter was targeting the 69 ward chiefs in a strategy to steal Democratic support from his Democratic opponent, U.S. Rep. Joseph M. Hoeffel. So Mayor Street and other officials in the party pressed for unity at the meeting last week. Specter's reach into the Democratic ward level in Philadelphia is the latest example of his dash across the political spectrum since the April Republican primary forced him into playing up his conservative credentials to barely outlast U.S. Rep. Patrick J. Toomey.
NEWS
April 22, 1999 | By Robert A. Rankin and David Montgomery, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Clinton administration said yesterday that up to 20,000 ethnic Albanian refugees will be brought to the United States to live indefinitely, and NATO sought to carry its air war against Yugoslavia directly to President Slobodan Milosevic by bombing his party headquarters in Belgrade. NATO also seemed to inch closer to possible intervention on the ground as Western governments signaled that military commanders would prepare an up-to-date invasion plan to be used if needed. U.S. Apache attack helicopters also began arriving in Albania for a combat role that closely resembles ground combat.
NEWS
October 31, 1996 | By Chris Conway, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer news researchers Jennifer Ewing Elliott and Michael Panzer contributed to this article
It's the usual suspects - plus a couple of unusual ones. The list includes unions, lawyers, big tobacco, big liquor, health-care companies, Hollywood moguls, Wall Street, the gambling industry, other companies, rich people. It's the last look you'll get at the enormous sums of so-called soft money in this election until long after the polls close Tuesday. It includes the biggest givers to the Democratic and Republican Parties since July 1. And it includes the names of two givers who had their checks returned - at the last minute - by a Democratic National Committee under siege for having momentarily decided not to file its final preelection money report at all. Those names came to light as Republicans stepped up their criticism of Democratic fund-raising practices, and the White House said President Clinton would soon call for reforms to close the legal loophole that has allowed soft money to flow to both parties this year in record amounts.
NEWS
June 6, 1995 | By Nancy Phillips, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two top leaders of the Camden County Democratic Party testified in court yesterday that they took $3,000 in cash from a campaign contributor in 1992, converted it into a check and deposited it in the party's account. State election law prohibits cash contributions of more than $200. The party officials, George E. Norcross 3d and Christopher T. Morris, said they believed they had complied with that law because they converted the cash into a check and had promptly reported the contribution to the state.
NEWS
February 22, 1994 | By Nancy Phillips and Michael Raphael, FOR THE INQUIRER
George E. Norcross 3d, who built Camden County's Democratic Party into one of the most powerful political organizations in New Jersey, officially ended his tenure as party chairman last night at what amounted to a political pep rally. Nearly 400 Democrats gathered at party headquarters in Cherry Hill to toast Norcross' success as a fund-raiser and campaign organizer and to lament his leaving. Then they welcomed his handpicked successors: David A. Luthman of Pennsauken and Sandra F. Love of Laurel Springs, who will serve as co-chairs of the party.
NEWS
November 3, 1993 | By Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Martha W. Bark and Linda K. Coffey held on to their Burlington County freeholder seats, continuing the Republicans' absolute control of county government that began in 1983. Angela M. Davenport of Columbus and Gary M. Karr of Riverton, the Democratic candidates, accumulated about 46 percent of the vote between them, but neither got enough support to break onto the all-Republican board. "The freeholders race is always a difficult one, and for Gary and I, with the little bit of money we could muster, it was especially hard," said Davenport, 43, a public school administrator, conceding defeat at 10:45 p.m. "But I'm proud of myself and of Gary for how close we came for the Democrats.
NEWS
October 29, 1993 | By Nancy Phillips, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Critics say the Democratic Party has had too much influence in the day-to- day operations of Camden County's government. The Democrats deny it. But a set of 1992 telephone records from the office of Louis S. Bezich, the county's top administrator, show his office was in frequent contact with Democratic Party headquarters during working hours. In one month, the calls to party headquarters averaged more than one per working day. That month was February 1992, when county officials were dealing with a difficult budget and the prospect of more than 100 layoffs.
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