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Party Platform

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NEWS
July 20, 1992 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
So now it's on to Houston, from Madison Square Garden to the Astrodome, from mean streets to humidity hell. The political beast gets a month off before roaring to life again in Texas, where Republicans gather Aug. 17 for a coronation of George Bush. The two cities hosting the conventions this year seem to reflect ideologies and constituencies of the two major parties: New York, a crowded center of social ills and needs; Houston, a sprawling space-center city that's more suburban than urban.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Laurie Kellman, Associated Press
CHARLOTTE - Two top Democrats offered new details Thursday on how the party platform omitted references to God and to Jerusalem as Israel's capital. "It's not that someone had a plan, 'Let's back off the long Democratic Party policy that Jerusalem should be the capital of Israel,' " New York Sen. Charles E. Schumer told the Associated Press a day after the omission and reinstatement of the language caused dissension among delegates at the Democratic National Convention. "It was just sort of left out. " Told of the omissions, Obama directly ordered the language to be restored, Schumer said.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Julie Pace and Steve Peoples, Associated Press
CHARLOTTE - President Obama personally intervened to order Democrats to change language in their party platform to add a mention of God and declare that Jerusalem is the capital of Israel, campaign officials said Wednesday. Democrats abruptly changed the platform Wednesday evening to reinstate language from the 2008 platform that said "we need a government that stands up for the hopes, values and interests of working people and gives everyone willing to work hard the chance to make the most of their God-given potential.
NEWS
August 26, 1992 | by Christine Todd Whitman, From the New York Times
To the surprise of many pundits and to the disappointment of many Democrats, the 1992 Republican National Convention ended as it began - on an upbeat note. Despite our differences, Republicans understand that the top priority in the next 10 weeks is re-election of George Bush and election of a Republican Congress. But as we return to our states, it is likely that one divisive subject will dominate the national debate. Despite predictions that it will disappear as the economy and other issues move to the fore, abortion may become the defining issue in the campaign.
NEWS
August 13, 1996 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER CONVENTION BUREAU
Gov. Whitman's decision to go ahead and speak to the Republican National Convention this evening without mentioning abortion rights has her on the defensive. At nearly every news conference here, Whitman was asked why she won't promote her views on the subject during her prime-time address, and whether party leaders have muzzled her on the issue to promote an image of harmony. Three other prominent Republican moderates - Govs. Pete Wilson of California, William F. Weld of Massachusetts and George E. Pataki of New York - have had choice speaking assignments taken away, apparently as the result of their differences with the party platform on the abortion issue.
NEWS
February 14, 2000 | By Thomas Ginsberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When John McCain trounced George W. Bush in New Hampshire's Republican primary, Susan Cullman felt the jolt of a new possibility: Will this finally be the year her fellow Republicans soften their official party line against abortion? "McCain . . . gave pro-choice Republicans a slim ray of hope," said Cullman, leader of a small, Washington-based group of Republicans that has been pushing the party for years to open up to abortion-rights supporters. As McCain surges among centrist voters and changes the nature of the Republican contest, he also is throwing a curve into behind-the-scenes strategizing over abortion language in the party platform, which could turn into a battle again at the party's national convention in Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 31, 1992 | BY MIKE ROYKO
"You think that maybe God is a Republican?" Slats Grobnik asked. I don't know. My guess is that he's non-partisan. Why do you ask? "Well, listening to some of the Republicans, they talk like God is an honorary chairman of their party. Even President Bush slammed the Democrats for not mentioning God in their party platform. You think God really cares if he's in a party platform that hardly anybody reads anyway?" I've never heard a theologian express that view. "From what I can tell, most party platforms are a lot of baloney.
NEWS
September 6, 2012 | By David Espo, ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHARLOTTE - On a day when the weather thwarted some party plans and late changes to the party platform ruffled some feathers, Democrats turned to former President Bill Clinton on Wednesday night to deliver the message President Obama wanted viewers to hear. Obama inherited a wreck of an economy, "put a floor under the crash," and laid the foundation for millions of good new jobs, Clinton declared in a Democratic National Convention appeal aimed at millions of hard-pressed Americans yet to decide how to vote.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By David Espo, Associated Press
CHARLOTTE - On a day when the weather thwarted some party plans and late changes to the party platform ruffled some feathers, Democrats turned to former President Bill Clinton on Wednesday night to deliver the message President Obama wanted viewers to hear, capped with the two men embracing on stage. Obama inherited a wreck of an economy, "put a floor under the crash," and laid the foundation for millions of good new jobs, Clinton declared in a Democratic National Convention appeal aimed at millions of hard-pressed Americans yet to decide how to vote.
NEWS
July 14, 1992 | By Robert Zausner, INQUIRER CONVENTION BUREAU
Invoking the First Amendment and John F. Kennedy, Gov. Casey threatened yesterday to withhold his endorsement of the Democratic ticket as he pressed his crusade to give the anti-abortion movement a voice at the party's convention. Casey, speaking to a well-attended news conference hours before the convention opened, repeated his demand for time to address the delegates - a request that party officials so far have ignored. "I don't need any lectures about party loyalty," Casey said, noting his traditional support of Democrats.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 11, 2012 | By Josh Lederman, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Warning to Amtrak from Mitt Romney and Republicans: You're on your own. The platform Republicans adopted at their convention included a call for full privatization and an end to subsidies for the nation's passenger rail operator, which gobbled up almost $1.5 billion in federal funds last year. "It is long past time for the federal government to get out of the way and allow private ventures to provide passenger service," the platform said, arguing that taxpayers dole out almost $50 for every Amtrak ticket.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Laurie Kellman, Associated Press
CHARLOTTE - Two top Democrats offered new details Thursday on how the party platform omitted references to God and to Jerusalem as Israel's capital. "It's not that someone had a plan, 'Let's back off the long Democratic Party policy that Jerusalem should be the capital of Israel,' " New York Sen. Charles E. Schumer told the Associated Press a day after the omission and reinstatement of the language caused dissension among delegates at the Democratic National Convention. "It was just sort of left out. " Told of the omissions, Obama directly ordered the language to be restored, Schumer said.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Julie Pace and Steve Peoples, Associated Press
CHARLOTTE - President Obama personally intervened to order Democrats to change language in their party platform to add a mention of God and declare that Jerusalem is the capital of Israel, campaign officials said Wednesday. Democrats abruptly changed the platform Wednesday evening to reinstate language from the 2008 platform that said "we need a government that stands up for the hopes, values and interests of working people and gives everyone willing to work hard the chance to make the most of their God-given potential.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By David Espo, Associated Press
CHARLOTTE - On a day when the weather thwarted some party plans and late changes to the party platform ruffled some feathers, Democrats turned to former President Bill Clinton on Wednesday night to deliver the message President Obama wanted viewers to hear, capped with the two men embracing on stage. Obama inherited a wreck of an economy, "put a floor under the crash," and laid the foundation for millions of good new jobs, Clinton declared in a Democratic National Convention appeal aimed at millions of hard-pressed Americans yet to decide how to vote.
NEWS
September 6, 2012 | By David Espo, ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHARLOTTE - On a day when the weather thwarted some party plans and late changes to the party platform ruffled some feathers, Democrats turned to former President Bill Clinton on Wednesday night to deliver the message President Obama wanted viewers to hear. Obama inherited a wreck of an economy, "put a floor under the crash," and laid the foundation for millions of good new jobs, Clinton declared in a Democratic National Convention appeal aimed at millions of hard-pressed Americans yet to decide how to vote.
NEWS
August 29, 2012
THE LAST TIME they held the political conventions in Florida was 1972. It was the summer that I turned 13 years old. I was falling in love for the first time. With politics, that is. Forty years ago, it was Miami Beach and not Tampa that was the humid and pulsating heart of U.S. politics. Terrified by the violence and unrest of the 1968 Democratic confab in Chicago, both parties saw that beachside city of imposing rococo resorts as the last safe place in America. The GOP convention was utterly forgettable except for the sight of Sammy Davis Jr. hugging the awkward President Richard Nixon.
NEWS
September 2, 2008 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER SENIOR WRITER
ST. PAUL, Minn. - No music, other than the national anthem. No funny hats. No scathing, partisan rhetoric. Lots of empty seats. As Hurricane Gustav buffeted the Gulf Coast, the Republican National Convention got under way yesterday with an abbreviated, bare-bones business session - and with appeals for contributions to the American Red Cross and other relief agencies. "When such events occur, we're reminded that first we're all Americans," said Laura Bush, who originally had been scheduled to give a political speech last night, along with President Bush and Vice President Cheney, "and that our shared American ideals will always transcend political parties and partisanship.
NEWS
August 31, 2004 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bob Flisser knows just what he's looking for in a romantic partner. Beauty, vivaciousness, and a penchant for long walks on the beach do not top his list. Here's what the Flemington, N.J., computer consultant is seeking: "An active and energetic female (mid-30s to mid-40s) who wants to see George Bush impeached. " Flisser, 42, recently posted that description on DemocraticSingles.Net, one of a growing number of online dating sites catering to those looking for love among the politically like-minded.
NEWS
August 31, 2004
Today continues Red State/Blue State, a feature presented by the Anniston Star of Anniston, Ala., and The Philadelphia Inquirer. Today, our "blue-staters," Terri Falbo and Tim Horner, and our "red-staters," Joe Franklin and Cynthia Sneed, ponder this question: "What makes you a conservative? What are the values that underlie your allegiance to your chosen form of political belief?" Excerpts from their Web logs appear below. For their complete blogs, consult the Red State/Blue State Web site at http://go.
NEWS
July 28, 2004 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In modern American politics, party platforms rarely have much impact on elections. And the one adopted yesterday at the Democratic National Convention in Boston is likely to uphold that tradition. The Democrats' 2004 version, titled "Strong at Home, Respected in the World," stresses both national security and the animosity various party factions feel toward the occupant of the White House. Throughout the 42-page statement of goals and principles, the authors save their most pointed language for denunciations of President Bush and his administration, accusing them of showing a dangerous "disregard for the world.
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