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Passover

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NEWS
April 8, 2009 | By Inquirer Staff
Passover, the Jewish festival commemorating the release of the Isrealites from slavery in Egypt, begins at sunset tonight. The eight-day holiday is celebrated on the first two nights with a meal called the Seder. Focal points of the Seder include eating matzah, eating bitter herbs to commemorate the bitterness of slavery, rinking four cups of wine or grape juice to celebrate freedom and recitation of the Haggadah, a liturgy that describes the story of the Exodus from Egypt. During the eight days of passover, Jews refrain from eating leavened bread, replacing it with matzah to commemorate the unleavened bread the Israelites ate in their hurried flight from Egypt.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | Staff Report
Today is both Good Friday and the start of Passover. For Christians, the day recalls the crucifixion of Jesus on a hill outside Jerusalem's walls. Catholics, Episcopalians and some Lutherans mark the day with solemn observances, including the Stations of the Cross, which traced Jesus's journey from when he was condemned to death to his quick burial in tomb; and Tenebrae, a service during which candles are gradually extinguished while a series of readings and psalms are said or chanted.
NEWS
March 29, 1996 | BY IRV ACKELSBERG
Every year during this season Jews gather around the Passover table to retell the story of our liberation from Egypt. In the tradition surrounding the seder, we are taught that part of the obligation of Passover is to regard oneself as having been personally freed from bondage and that it is particularly praiseworthy to expand on the story of Exodus. The traditional Haggadah recounts not only the redemption from Egypt, but also that seder night long ago when five rabbis gathered to talk of resistance to the Roman Empire.
NEWS
March 21, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / GERALD S. WILLIAMS
About 90 people turned out at an Ascension of Our Lord Roman Catholic Church, F and Westmoreland Streets, yesterday for a model Seder, the traditional Passover meal. Led by Rabbi Daniel P. Parker of Temple Zion in Huntingdon Valley, the meal was designed to familiarize Christians with the custom. Among the items central to the Seder are, right, (clockwise from the wine) the eggs; charoset, a sweet mixture of nuts, fruit and wine; horseradish; greens and, in the center, saltwater. Above the Seder plate is the matzo, or unleavened bread; below it is the Haggada, which tells the story of the ancient Hebrews' escape from slavery in Egypt.
NEWS
April 19, 1989 | By Judy Baehr, Special to The Inquirer
Like other "nouvelle cuisine" these days, Jewish cooking has "gone light," as 35 of the 70 members of the Raquela Hadassah discovered last week when they gathered at the Kings Supermarket Cooking Studio at Main Street, Voorhees, for a kosher cooking demonstration. Culinary expert Shirley Rubinstein of Cinnaminson, a frequent instructor at Kings, and assistants Jessica Rudner, Joan Duffield and Ann Fitzpatrick, prepared a six-course meal last Wednesday several light years removed from traditional Passover fare.
NEWS
April 4, 1998 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Why is this toy different from all other toys? For one thing, the Plagues Bag helps children understand the story of Passover, the Jewish holiday about the Jews' exodus from Egypt in biblical times. The story of Passover, recounted each year at the ritual seder meal, is not usually the stuff of fun and games. "I grew up [in Philadelphia] reading the story from rote," said Simon Jaffe, executive director of the Jewish Community Center of Metropolitan New Jersey in West Orange, N.J. "It was something we tried to rush through to get to the food.
NEWS
April 9, 1990 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The slim, blue volume appears at first glance no different from other books used at Passover meals to recount the ancient story of Jewish liberation from slavery in Egypt. But unlike other Passover books, it has no prayers, no references to God except as a figure in ancient myth. The blue-bound book is a haggada, a collection of readings and songs to be used at the seder, the holiday meal of Passover. But it is - as its subtitle proclaims - a haggada "for a secular celebration of Pesach (Passover)
NEWS
April 9, 1997 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Women of Reform Judaism of Beth David Reform Congregation, 1130 Vaughns Lane, Gladwyne, will host a women's Passover conference and lunch from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday. The conference will include spiritual and creative workshops connecting women and Passover. The cost is $20. Reservations may be made by calling 610-896-7485. PROGRAMS Stefanie Seltzer, a member of the speakers bureau of the Jewish Community Relations Council of Greater Philadelphia and past president of Child Survivors of the Holocaust local chapter, will discuss "The Hidden Child: Child Survivors of the Holocaust" at 7 p.m. next Wednesday at Woodside Cottage, Haverford College, 370 Lancaster Ave. The program is sponsored by Hillel for students at suburban college campuses.
FOOD
April 17, 2008 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everyone has a favorite recipe for Passover brisket, passed down through the generations or discovered online. But dessert is another matter. Dietary laws forbid the use of yeast, flour and baking powder at Passover. It's a restriction that stumps beginning bakers and challenges even the most experienced. That explains why nearly 45 women (and three men - two husbands and a son) signed up to sip wine, sample hors d'oeuvres, and learn from the James Beard-award-winning chef and cookbook author Aliza Green, who conducted a class on baking for Passover last month at the kosher restaurant Max & David's.
NEWS
March 24, 1991 | By Edward Engel, Special to The Inquirer
A gaggle of 4- and 5-year-olds stood wide-eyed before Rabbi Yosef Serebryanski as he flung water and flour together in a large metal bowl. Rabbi Serebryanski stirred the sticky mixture until it took on the consistency of dough. Then, under the watchful guidance of teachers and parents, the pre-schoolers took over, molding the dough into tiny spheres and rolling them vigorously with wooden pins. The final product? A certain toasted cracker-like snack known as the matzo. And on a recent morning at the Jewish Community Center on Route 70 in Cherry Hill, 29 neophyte chefs from the township's Congregation M'Kor Shalom Nursery School were also being peppered with a barrage of Passover holiday questions from the rabbi and the other adults.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 29, 2016
By Cindy Skrzycki I was at a table of 20 or so family and friends for the first night of Passover. There were the traditional, beloved prayers, blessings, and thanks for liberation. The bitter and the sweet. The communal seder. I am no stranger to this: It was probably my 35th year at a seder table. My daughter, a first-year rabbinic student, is in Crimea, where she is a stranger and can't communicate without a translator. But, with another Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion classmate, she helped conduct seders for Jewish communities in Crimea.
NEWS
April 23, 2016
By Sally Friedman The message was delivered by email, as so many things that affect our lives arrive these days. No envelope as a buffer zone. It was from our synagogue in Cherry Hill. And like its delivery, its message was direct. The synagogue was advising members of increased security measures at this house of worship, this presumed sanctuary from the travails of the outside world. Seems that in this beleaguered time, even access to our synagogues is changing. I guess I shouldn't be surprised - but I am. And sad, too. In this Passover season, when Jews are asked to remember being slaves in Egypt, one has to wonder how free we Jews are. And on the surface, we live freely and move freely, presumably in peace and safety.
FOOD
April 22, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Matzo is known to Jews observing Passover as "the bread of affliction," and after eight days of eating the stuff, that title really starts to ring true. An overgrown cracker with cumbersome ridges and all the flavor of copy paper, it's an inelegant sandwich vehicle that tends to shatter under the pressure of a vigorous schmear. And yet, it turns out, matzo is also surprisingly versatile. At a time of year when other wheat-based foods are off the table, it can be a cook's secret weapon.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2015 | By Michael D. Schaffer, For The Inquirer
This weekend welcomes two holidays. There will be Easter eggs and candy for some, seders and matzo for others, as Christians celebrate Easter on Sunday and Jews begin their eight-day observance of Passover at sundown Friday.   Easter If you're celebrating Easter, here are a few places where you can hop on down the bunny trail. Let the great egg hunt begin! Stenton Easter Egg Hunt. 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday. Search for eggs and chocolates at the colonial home of William Penn's secretary James Logan.
NEWS
March 31, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joan Pavalow had planned a trip to the supermarket this week - with Passover just a few days away, she needed groceries. But then she decided not to go. She just didn't have the money, she said. So on Sunday afternoon, when the Kepniss family - David and Marla and their four kids - showed up at her apartment with two bags full of kosher-for-Passover food, Pavalow reacted with gratitude - and relief. "This is a life-saver to me," she said. "I don't have the money to go to Shop Rite - and this is wonderful.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Filmmakers seem to love outdoing one another when it comes to biblical tales. From Cecil B. DeMille ( The Ten Commandments ) to Richard Fleischer ( Barabbas ) to the team of film giants behind The Greatest Story Ever Told , which included George Stevens and David Lean, the obsession usually is to go big: big stars, big sets, and most definitely huge, special-effects-driven set pieces. Darren Aronofsky accomplished the feat with last year's Noah , a phantasmagoric telling of the biblical patriarch and the flood that made him famous.
FOOD
March 27, 2015 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Most cultures have traditions and rituals that herald spring. Who isn't grateful for signs leading toward a season of abundance and growth after the scarcity of winter? Many of these traditions feature eggs, from traditional Easter egg hunts, to the Cimburijada festival of scrambled eggs in Zenica, Bosnia - where 1,500 eggs will be cooked for the town to share the official moment spring begins - to Egypt's Sham El-Nissim holiday, celebrated back to the time of the pharaohs with spring onions and colored eggs.
FOOD
March 27, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the traditional Passover seder meal, a symbolic piece of matzo called the afikoman is passed around the table to serve as the final course. So, the word, afikoman - literally, "that which comes after" - is often translated as "dessert. " Chocolate soufflé, it's not. Yet, it compares favorably to the dry, pasty cakes, crumbly cookies and store-bought macaroons that often pass for dessert during this difficult-to-bake-for holiday, when the flour, yeast and corn starch we normally rely on for baking and sweets-making are forbidden.
NEWS
May 12, 2014 | By Carrie Rickey, For The Inquirer
It was April, and Judith Helfand was dreading her first motherless Mother's Day. Since her mother died in September, the award-winning filmmaker had a hole in her heart. Compounding the hollowness, she was en route to her first parentless Passover seder. A casualty of a pharmaceutical time bomb, Helfand could not have biological children. After her mother, Florence, miscarried in 1963, the doctor prescribed the "miracle drug" diethylstilbestrol (DES) so it wouldn't happen again. The next year, she gave birth to Judith, who grew up and - like one in every 1,000 DES daughters - developed cervical cancer.
NEWS
April 15, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
  So you're hosting the second seder of the Passover holiday? Your guests have already been to Monday's first-night ritual meal that commemorates the freedom of the Israelites from slavery. That host got the excitement and anticipation that comes with being first. Now what? With the right amount of planning, local rabbis say, the second seder on Tuesday can be the star. That's because a new mix of guests, different venues, and inventive interpretations make the second night of the eight-day holiday as exciting - if not more exciting - than the first.
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