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Passover Seder

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NEWS
April 7, 2001 | By Rabbi Simon Jacobson
What is the healthiest thing you can do for your child today to help arm him or her with tools to prevent many of today's social maladies? As we witness the deep void in children's lives today, we can learn a profound lesson from a 3,000-year-old tradition. Tonight, in homes across the world, children will begin the Passover Seder by entertaining the Four Questions. They are introduced by a great, overarching question: How is this night different from all other nights? And that leads to the four: On all other nights, we eat either leavened bread or matzo.
NEWS
April 3, 2004 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When is Passover, Rabbi Arthur Waskow wondered last week. The scholarly Waskow knew, of course, that the "night unlike any other night" is the 14th day in the Jewish month of Nisan, which is Monday this year. Instead, his question was a reflection on liturgical time. Waskow, director of the Shalom Center in Mount Airy, has written a new haggadah liturgy for Passover, and will use it as coleader of a public, interfaith New Freedom Seder tomorrow at the Episcopal Church of the Advocate, 18th and Diamond Streets in North Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 18, 2008 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Passover couldn't happen until Suzanne Nahamo got her five-pound lamb. So she waited with her two children at the butcher counter of the Narberth Acme, transformed into a Passover bazaar yesterday as Jewish customers stocked up for their seders - the first two feasts of the eight-day holiday that begins at sundown tomorrow. A similarly jovial scene played out in dozens of local communities, as an estimated 200,000 Philadelphia-area Jewish residents readied themselves for the holiday that celebrates the exodus of Jews from slavery in Egypt.
FOOD
May 7, 2000 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
The preparations for Susanna Goihman's Passover seder began one week early and more than 1,200 miles away. Susanna's mother, Dorothy Goihman, made a batch of crunchy dill pickles at her home in Miami, and prepared and froze two desserts: fluden, a flourless fruit and nut cake, and a flourless chocolate fig cake. Closer to the holiday, her mother made eggplant salad, spicy Moroccan meatballs, potato flan and macaroons. The day before the seder, she packed everything for the flight to Philadelphia.
FOOD
April 14, 2005 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
The story of the Passover seder at Vetri is an unconventional one. To begin with, there will be no matzo balls. But the matzo itself will be homemade. And there will be, as one would expect from one of the city's leading Italian chefs, a Mediterranean accent to the meal. At which, we must add, there will be no paying customers - only close friends and family. That Marc Vetri should host a private seder at all (for the second year) might come as a surprise to patrons who have seen the special joy on his face when he cranks the antique prosciutto slicer in the dining room.
NEWS
April 1, 1999 | REBECCA BARGER / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Jodi Ann Maslow sets a table for a Passover seder at Congregation B'nai Abraham on Lombard Street. The Jewish holiday, commemorating the Hebrews' liberation from slavery in Egypt, began at sundown last night and continues through April 8.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2004 | Los Angeles Daily News
If this is your year to host the Passover Seder, don't panic. It's really not difficult to pull off in style if you keep it simple and easy, says Zell Schulman, author of "Passover Seders Made Simple" (Wiley; $16.95) and two other cookbooks, from her home in Cincinnati. "Preparing for Passover should be an adventure rather than a chore. "Look at the Passover Seder as something different, fun and a challenge," advises the 76-year old mother of four, who has been cooking and hosting an annual Seder for more than 45 years.
NEWS
April 12, 1987 | By Francie Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Rosalind R. Schilder fell in love with the Passover celebration when she was a young girl growing up in Brooklyn. She has fond memories of the family gatherings and the special food that was served, even though she didn't understand the Hebrew spoken at the table. The Passover Seder, a ritual meal served on the first two nights of the Jewish holiday, took on a new meaning for the Plymouth Meeting free-lance writer several years ago. She and her family joined her brother and sister- in-law, Ephraim and Estelle Leibowitz of Brooklyn, for a less traditional celebration.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2016 | Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
At her family's Passover seder last April, Rabbi Debra Orenstein opted for the layered look: an ordinary T-shirt topped by a purple-and-black blouse made in India - and very likely sewn in a sweatshop by slave labor. At the moment when the seder's leader typically holds up a piece of matzo and declares, "This is the bread of affliction" - symbolizing the ancient Israelites' enslavement and hasty flight from Egypt - Orenstein startled her guests by peeling off the Indian blouse. "This," she announced, "is the shirt of affliction!"
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2015 | By Michael D. Schaffer, For The Inquirer
This weekend welcomes two holidays. There will be Easter eggs and candy for some, seders and matzo for others, as Christians celebrate Easter on Sunday and Jews begin their eight-day observance of Passover at sundown Friday.   Easter If you're celebrating Easter, here are a few places where you can hop on down the bunny trail. Let the great egg hunt begin! Stenton Easter Egg Hunt. 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday. Search for eggs and chocolates at the colonial home of William Penn's secretary James Logan.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2012 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there Two weeks after moving to Los Angeles, Cory was on set for the taping of his first acting gig: a commercial for a circus school. "What am I doing with my life?" he asked himself. Then a blonde acrobat flew overhead, ending all existential thought. Cory grew up in Texas and Ohio, and moved to Los Angeles in 2009 after earning an international affairs degree from George Washington University. He wanted to make friends in his new city, and it wouldn't hurt if one of them was gorgeous and graceful.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2012 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the other end of the phone line, Joshua Nelson is breaking into a traditional cantorial rendition of "Adon Olom , " the Hebrew prayer that ends most Shabbat morning services. In an instant, your whole childhood sitting in synagogue emerges vividly in deep, operatic vibrato. There's no doubt that Nelson - an African American Jew who traces his Jewish roots to Senegal and Romania - can do 15th-century traditional singing. But then he ramps into his own version of "Adon Olom , " in a style he calls "kosher gospel" - drawn from his devotion to both old-fashioned Mahalia Jackson-style gospel and traditional Jewish worship - and a whole new world of spiritual reckoning comes into being.
NEWS
April 27, 2011 | By BROAD STREET BULLY as told to DAN GERINGER, bully@phillynews.com 215-854-5961
IN THE CALM before the Game 7 storm last night at the Wells Fargo Center, Broad Street Bully gazed out at the ice and wondered, "Will the crowd be roaring, 'Booosh!' or 'Booo!'?" By the second period, he realized that it would be "Booosh!" all the way. Brian Boucher made 26 saves on 28 shots last night as the Flyers beat the Buffalo Sabres, 5-2, to advance to the Eastern Conference semifinals. "The floodgates finally opened," said relieved and happy lifelong die-hard Mike Greenspun, 50, of Cherry Hill.
NEWS
April 2, 2010 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To adorn his Passover table, J.A. Joel could find no sweet paste to represent the mortar that Jews used to build Egyptian storehouses. Instead, he used the closest symbol he could find - a brick. Joel had no choice but to improvise. He was in the Union Army on the front lines of the Civil War, but still he found a way to observe the festival that marks the Israelites' freedom from slavery. That scene, which Joel later recounted in a letter, was reenacted last week as part of a yearlong program in the Philadelphia region to illuminate the lives of Jews during the War Between the States.
NEWS
December 10, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sallie Ruth MacCorkell, 84, an English teacher at Philadelphia High School for Girls for 28 years, died of heart failure Dec. 2 at Cathedral Village in Andorra. Miss MacCorkell graduated from Girls High in 1942. After earning a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Pennsylvania in 1946, she taught at Agnes Irwin, a Main Line private school for girls. In 1954, she returned to Girls High as an English teacher. While there, she earned a master's degree in English from Penn.
NEWS
November 18, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Donna E. Arzt, 53, formerly of Levittown, a professor of international law at Syracuse University who aided families who lost loved ones in the explosion of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, died Saturday at Crouse Hospital in Syracuse, N.Y. The cause of death was multiple systems atrophy, a neurological disease. Ms. Arzt was the director of the Lockerbie Trial Families Project. The project, established with a grant from the U.S. Department of Justice, kept families of the 270 victims of the 1988 explosion informed about trial proceedings of the terrorists accused of bombing the plane.
NEWS
April 22, 2008 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At Passover seders throughout the region last weekend, Jewish families gathered to retell the story of the Exodus from Egypt. Each generation keeps the story alive for the next. But for the family of Delcy Weinberg, 82, of Northeast Philadelphia, the seder has an additional significance. She is descended from a community of Turkish Jews whose native tongue, Ladino, is near extinction. Nearly 100 of Weinberg's kin - some from as far as South Carolina and Florida - attended the family's 26th annual seder Sunday night at the Westin Hotel in Mount Laurel.
NEWS
April 18, 2008 | By Eliseo D. Rozenwasser
Tomorrow night, all around the world, Jewish families with their friends and guests will sit around the Passover table to celebrate and reexperience the event that has left the deepest mark in the history of the Jewish people: the exodus from Egypt. According to data from the 1990 National Jewish Population Survey, more people celebrate Passover than any other Jewish holiday. Why? Let's understand what Passover is. According to the Book of Genesis and rabbinic literature, Jacob and his family went down to Egypt leaving behind a severe famine in the land of Canaan.
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