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Passover

NEWS
April 9, 1997 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Women of Reform Judaism of Beth David Reform Congregation, 1130 Vaughns Lane, Gladwyne, will host a women's Passover conference and lunch from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday. The conference will include spiritual and creative workshops connecting women and Passover. The cost is $20. Reservations may be made by calling 610-896-7485. PROGRAMS Stefanie Seltzer, a member of the speakers bureau of the Jewish Community Relations Council of Greater Philadelphia and past president of Child Survivors of the Holocaust local chapter, will discuss "The Hidden Child: Child Survivors of the Holocaust" at 7 p.m. next Wednesday at Woodside Cottage, Haverford College, 370 Lancaster Ave. The program is sponsored by Hillel for students at suburban college campuses.
FOOD
April 17, 2008 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everyone has a favorite recipe for Passover brisket, passed down through the generations or discovered online. But dessert is another matter. Dietary laws forbid the use of yeast, flour and baking powder at Passover. It's a restriction that stumps beginning bakers and challenges even the most experienced. That explains why nearly 45 women (and three men - two husbands and a son) signed up to sip wine, sample hors d'oeuvres, and learn from the James Beard-award-winning chef and cookbook author Aliza Green, who conducted a class on baking for Passover last month at the kosher restaurant Max & David's.
NEWS
March 24, 1991 | By Edward Engel, Special to The Inquirer
A gaggle of 4- and 5-year-olds stood wide-eyed before Rabbi Yosef Serebryanski as he flung water and flour together in a large metal bowl. Rabbi Serebryanski stirred the sticky mixture until it took on the consistency of dough. Then, under the watchful guidance of teachers and parents, the pre-schoolers took over, molding the dough into tiny spheres and rolling them vigorously with wooden pins. The final product? A certain toasted cracker-like snack known as the matzo. And on a recent morning at the Jewish Community Center on Route 70 in Cherry Hill, 29 neophyte chefs from the township's Congregation M'Kor Shalom Nursery School were also being peppered with a barrage of Passover holiday questions from the rabbi and the other adults.
NEWS
March 27, 1998 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A group of workshops to celebrate Passover will be held at Jewish Community Center, Kaiserman Branch, 45 Haverford Ave., Wynnewood: "The Four Children of the Haggadah: Do They Sit At Your Table?" 10:30 to 11:45 a.m. Sunday, free; "Why This Seder Night Is Different," 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. Monday, free; "Kosher Cooking for Passover," 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, $4 for members and $5 for nonmembers. For information, call Bonnie Bailis, 610-896-7770. A community Passover seder will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Tuesday at Rosemont College, 1400 Montgomery Ave. The seder is sponsored by the campus ministry and will be led by Ethel Levenson, former dean of students at Rosemont.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A "Passover Seder With a Sisterhood Perspective" will be celebrated at 6 p.m. Wednesday at Old York Road Temple-Beth Am, 971 Old York Rd., Abington. The program will include stories of Jewish women and their roles in the Exodus. Dinner will follow the Seder. Pages in a "Women of Valor" section of the Hagaddah can be purchased by guests to honor special women. Proceeds will benefit area women's shelters. For information, call 215-657-7384. On the Calendar "A Treasury of Inspiration for Passover and the Seder" will be the subject of a talk by Rabbi Sidney Greenberg and a panel discussion by area rabbis at 1:30 p.m. Sunday at Gratz College, 7605 Old York Rd., Melrose Park.
NEWS
April 18, 2000 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
Passover, which begins tomorrow at sundown in Jewish homes, has the youngest child at the seder table asking four questions that begin, "Why is this night different from all other nights?" A ground-breaking liturgy just published by the locally based Jewish Reconstructionist movement turns it sidewise by asking: "Why is this haggadah different from all other haggadahs?" For starters, "A Night of Questions" is four haggadahs in one. The language is gender-neutral. And readings range beyond Jewish scholars to Martin Luther King and Yasser Arafat's mother-in-law.
FOOD
April 12, 1995 | by Phyllis Stein-Novack, Special to the Daily News
During a Passover seder many years ago, my niece posed a question only a kid could ask: "Aunt Phyllis, what kind of fish is a gefilte? Is it like flounder?" After the laughter died down, I told her that gefilte fish is not a specific kind of fish, although at the time I hadn't a clue as to what gefilte meant. I explained that in our family, gefilte fish was a poached fish ball made from ground carp, although it can be prepared using pike, whitefish or a mixture of all three.
NEWS
March 31, 1993 | Inquirer photographs by William F. Steinmetz
Passover was still a week away, but students from Bala Cynwyd's Solomon Schechter Day School were already into the swing of it yesterday. They held their annual model seder - a teaching version of the ritual meal that marks the start of the holiday in Jewish homes.
NEWS
April 20, 1986 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
The Passover holiday, which celebrates the deliverance of the Hebrews from Egypt, begins Wednesday evening and ends on April 30. During this time, certain dietary restrictions are in effect, and those keeping the holiday may not eat anything made with flour or grain, except for specially prepared matzoh (unleavened bread). To help Passover observers cope with these restrictions and still enjoy a chance to dine out, the Jewish Community Center (JCC) of Cherry Hill has opened a Passover restaurant which will serve lunch and dinner on April 27, 28 and 29. The meals, prepared by Betty the Caterer of Philadelphia, will be kosher and made under rabbinical supervision.
NEWS
April 7, 2009 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
The rhythms are so familiar, starting with the flurry of phone calls from household to household about who is bringing the bridge chairs, who will lug the large platters, and whether anyone happens to have about a dozen spare serving utensils and a pot large enough to heat up gallons of chicken soup. It's all routine on the days leading up to Passover, and the family seder. It's all encoded into our family DNA, this back-and-forth in the spring of the year when our family joins with Jews around the world as we celebrate the story of Jewish liberation from slavery in Egypt.
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