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Passover

NEWS
March 27, 1998 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A group of workshops to celebrate Passover will be held at Jewish Community Center, Kaiserman Branch, 45 Haverford Ave., Wynnewood: "The Four Children of the Haggadah: Do They Sit At Your Table?" 10:30 to 11:45 a.m. Sunday, free; "Why This Seder Night Is Different," 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. Monday, free; "Kosher Cooking for Passover," 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, $4 for members and $5 for nonmembers. For information, call Bonnie Bailis, 610-896-7770. A community Passover seder will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Tuesday at Rosemont College, 1400 Montgomery Ave. The seder is sponsored by the campus ministry and will be led by Ethel Levenson, former dean of students at Rosemont.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A "Passover Seder With a Sisterhood Perspective" will be celebrated at 6 p.m. Wednesday at Old York Road Temple-Beth Am, 971 Old York Rd., Abington. The program will include stories of Jewish women and their roles in the Exodus. Dinner will follow the Seder. Pages in a "Women of Valor" section of the Hagaddah can be purchased by guests to honor special women. Proceeds will benefit area women's shelters. For information, call 215-657-7384. On the Calendar "A Treasury of Inspiration for Passover and the Seder" will be the subject of a talk by Rabbi Sidney Greenberg and a panel discussion by area rabbis at 1:30 p.m. Sunday at Gratz College, 7605 Old York Rd., Melrose Park.
NEWS
April 18, 2000 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
Passover, which begins tomorrow at sundown in Jewish homes, has the youngest child at the seder table asking four questions that begin, "Why is this night different from all other nights?" A ground-breaking liturgy just published by the locally based Jewish Reconstructionist movement turns it sidewise by asking: "Why is this haggadah different from all other haggadahs?" For starters, "A Night of Questions" is four haggadahs in one. The language is gender-neutral. And readings range beyond Jewish scholars to Martin Luther King and Yasser Arafat's mother-in-law.
FOOD
April 12, 1995 | by Phyllis Stein-Novack, Special to the Daily News
During a Passover seder many years ago, my niece posed a question only a kid could ask: "Aunt Phyllis, what kind of fish is a gefilte? Is it like flounder?" After the laughter died down, I told her that gefilte fish is not a specific kind of fish, although at the time I hadn't a clue as to what gefilte meant. I explained that in our family, gefilte fish was a poached fish ball made from ground carp, although it can be prepared using pike, whitefish or a mixture of all three.
NEWS
March 31, 1993 | Inquirer photographs by William F. Steinmetz
Passover was still a week away, but students from Bala Cynwyd's Solomon Schechter Day School were already into the swing of it yesterday. They held their annual model seder - a teaching version of the ritual meal that marks the start of the holiday in Jewish homes.
NEWS
April 18, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Passover week starts at sundown today, and traditionally extended families gather in homes for a recounting of the Jewish exodus from Egypt and the sharing of the seder, a ritual meal with courses steeped in symbolism. The story is retold, typically read from a text called the Haggadah, of how God, angered by the pharoah's refusal to release the Jews from slavery, killed the first-born sons of Egypt, but "passed over" Jewish homes. After the parting of the Red Sea helped the Jews escape, God gave Moses the 10 Commandments and the people wandered the desert for 40 years before reaching the promised land of Israel, according to biblical accounts.
NEWS
April 20, 1986 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
The Passover holiday, which celebrates the deliverance of the Hebrews from Egypt, begins Wednesday evening and ends on April 30. During this time, certain dietary restrictions are in effect, and those keeping the holiday may not eat anything made with flour or grain, except for specially prepared matzoh (unleavened bread). To help Passover observers cope with these restrictions and still enjoy a chance to dine out, the Jewish Community Center (JCC) of Cherry Hill has opened a Passover restaurant which will serve lunch and dinner on April 27, 28 and 29. The meals, prepared by Betty the Caterer of Philadelphia, will be kosher and made under rabbinical supervision.
NEWS
April 7, 2009 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
The rhythms are so familiar, starting with the flurry of phone calls from household to household about who is bringing the bridge chairs, who will lug the large platters, and whether anyone happens to have about a dozen spare serving utensils and a pot large enough to heat up gallons of chicken soup. It's all routine on the days leading up to Passover, and the family seder. It's all encoded into our family DNA, this back-and-forth in the spring of the year when our family joins with Jews around the world as we celebrate the story of Jewish liberation from slavery in Egypt.
NEWS
April 13, 1987 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
An ancient Jewish practice has been turned into a practical way of dealing with the problem of hunger this Passover. For centuries, Jews have scoured their homes before each Passover to remove the leavened food not acceptable for use during the holiday. Traditionally, that food, called hametz, has been burned or sold to non-Jews, who then sell it back after the eight-day holiday ends. This year, Jews across the Philadelphia area have been asked to give their hametz to help feed the hungry in a new project sponsored by the Board of Rabbis of Greater Philadelphia and the Jewish Community Relations Council of Greater Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 20, 2000 | By Mona Charen
For strictly observant Jews, the approach of Passover means a floor-to-ceiling spring cleaning. It also means retrieving from storage the special Passover china used just one week per year, and selling or giving away every bit of grain, beer, spirits made from grain, cakes, pasta and breakfast cereal. Not a trace of the forbidden khametz, (i.e., leavening) may be found in a Jewish home on the eve of Passover. Exodus 12:19 instructs "Seven days shall there be no leaven found in your houses; for whoever eats what is leavened, that person shall be cut off from the congregation, whether he be a stranger or a citizen of the land.
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