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Passover

NEWS
April 5, 2012 | Joyce Gemperlein
Parchment paper or vegetable cooking spray, for the baking sheet ½ pound (2 sticks) unsalted butter or nondairy margarine, at room  temperature 2 cups sugar 6 large eggs, at room temperature 1 teaspoon kosher-for-Passover  vanilla 2½ cups matzoh cake meal ¾ cup potato starch 4 cups (two 12-ounce bags) semisweet chocolate chips 1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or spray it. Cream the butter and sugar with an electric mixer on medium speed until smooth and creamy, about 2 minutes.
NEWS
April 5, 2012 | By Joyce Gemperlein, FOR THE INQUIRER
I grew up in a rural town where there were only two Jewish families and, although one of the boys was a close friend in high school, I never thought to ask him what he was eating instead of the tuna noodle casserole and other standbys we Catholics were consuming. With age came diverse neighbors and brazen mooching at their tables, especially on holidays. I've now been to a multitude of Passover seders and have heard for two types of food-related conversations there: ones about heirloom Jewish family recipes that commemorate the ancient Israelites' hasty flight from slavery in Egypt; and spirited debates about what is acceptable to eat on the holiday, which this year begins at sunset on Friday with the ritual seder dinner and continues for seven days.
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What a divine season it is for Jesus on Broadway. On one stage, nuns make a joyful noise in Sister Act. On another, he figures highly in The Book of Mormon . Yet another has him as the central figure in Godspell . And he is now in revival - here, we're talking Broadway more than theology - in an effusive Jesus Christ Superstar , the Tim Rice-Andrew Lloyd Webber musical that opened Thursday. It's full of powerful, melodic '70s-tinged music - the show premiered in 1971 and "I Don't Know How to Love Him" broke out to become a hit. The score, with Rice's clever lyrics and Lloyd Webbers many fanfare songs, is great fun to hear again, or probably also for the first time.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a dark and stormy night. No, really. So dark and so stormy in the play The Whipping Man , or maybe just in Arden Theatre Company's production of it, that The Constant Metaphor blasts you from the first crash of thunder to the last flash of lightning, when mist and fog are rolling in through a door and rain pours through the show's sound design. I was ducking by then, sure that the Arden stage crew would run through the aisles with buckets to drench us just in case anybody missed the point.
NEWS
April 27, 2011 | By BROAD STREET BULLY as told to DAN GERINGER, bully@phillynews.com 215-854-5961
IN THE CALM before the Game 7 storm last night at the Wells Fargo Center, Broad Street Bully gazed out at the ice and wondered, "Will the crowd be roaring, 'Booosh!' or 'Booo!'?" By the second period, he realized that it would be "Booosh!" all the way. Brian Boucher made 26 saves on 28 shots last night as the Flyers beat the Buffalo Sabres, 5-2, to advance to the Eastern Conference semifinals. "The floodgates finally opened," said relieved and happy lifelong die-hard Mike Greenspun, 50, of Cherry Hill.
NEWS
April 22, 2011
Thursday's "Tech Life" story incorrectly spelled the name of Raina Merchant, a physician developing a mobile-phone app for giving CPR instructions. A story Monday on Passover gave an incorrect number of days for the eight-day festival. A story Thursday about the press tour of a Ride the Ducks vehicle wrongly reported that the captain did not physically don a personal flotation device during his safety demonstration. Norman Schultz did put on the vest. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357)
NEWS
April 18, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Passover week starts at sundown today, and traditionally extended families gather in homes for a recounting of the Jewish exodus from Egypt and the sharing of the seder, a ritual meal with courses steeped in symbolism. The story is retold, typically read from a text called the Haggadah, of how God, angered by the pharoah's refusal to release the Jews from slavery, killed the first-born sons of Egypt, but "passed over" Jewish homes. After the parting of the Red Sea helped the Jews escape, God gave Moses the 10 Commandments and the people wandered the desert for 40 years before reaching the promised land of Israel, according to biblical accounts.
NEWS
April 17, 2011
Lila Bricklin is director of development at North Light Community Center in Manayunk Monday night during the seder meal, Jews worldwide will relive the redemption of the Israelites as written in the book of Exodus. The Haggadah - the book used to guide the seder and a word that means to tell, or the telling - says that in every generation each Jew must feel personally redeemed; we're supposed to embrace the exodus from Egypt as part of our own experience. As history has played out the last three months across North Africa and the Middle East, I feel like I've borne witness to the Passover story on my TV and laptop.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2011
Are you tasked with the dessert course for the Passover meal? These Pistachio Macaroons from Joan Nathan's Jewish Cooking in America are simple and delicious. Or try local cookbook author Aliza Green's Majorcan Lemon-Almond Cake, a moist and non-mealy Passover dessert. It's from her book Starting with Ingredients: Baking . PISTACHIO MACAROONS 3 cups shelled pistachio nuts 1 cup sugar 3 egg whites Sugar for dusting Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Whirl the pistachios in a food processor until ground but not pureed.
FOOD
April 14, 2011 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
The small gray loose-leaf binder is tattered. The typewritten letters - yes, from a typewriter - are fading. But for Jane Portnoy, that book is a vital taproot to her passion for cooking. It holds the recipes she started collecting growing up on the South Shore of Long Island, a mostly Jewish enclave, the place where her mother, Helen Zuger, a superb cook, diligently taught her daughter. The lessons took. Through college at Mount Holyoke, in the early years of marriage, when she worked as a French teacher, through medical school at the University of Louisville in Kentucky, and over the years cooking for her family, Portnoy has referred to that little gray book.
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