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Past Life

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NEWS
September 29, 2005 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Karrine Steffans recounts in her bawdy memoir, Confessions of a Video Vixen, there were plenty of rock-bottom moments for a chick who lived completely over the top: drug-induced seizures, living in her car, being passed around like a collection plate. But now she's reveling in success: She has sold more than 100,000 books in three months, is happily dating political humorist Bill Maher, and is promoting her story as more cautionary than salacious. "It would be hypocritical to say you shouldn't go into the video industry at all," says Steffans, who will discuss her book at Warmdaddy's on Sunday.
NEWS
November 30, 1998 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer
It is a bond that surpasses the normal mother-child relationship. Saman Sok, a 47-year-old refugee from Cambodia, and her 10-month-old baby, Jonathan, are inseparable. She constantly cradles him on her lap or on her hip, straightening his clothes and smoothing back his silky black hair. He is the link between her past and future. When she looks at him, Sok sees more than the youngest of her 10 children. She sees her husband. Sok believes Jonathan is the reincarnation of her 44-year-old husband, Sophal Mech, a carpenter and handyman she met in the Thai refugee camps.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1993 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
There's a pretty decent musical score bouncing around the Bushfire Theatre these evenings, a potpourri of agreeable tunes and toe-tapping rhythms in desperate search of a musical. The enterprise at the West Philadelphia playhouse is called Bo!, and there's something ironically apt about the fact that the cast list in the program inadvertently omits the character who gives the show its name. He's Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, the legendary tap-dancer who died in 1949, and Bo! is billed as a loose examination of his life.
NEWS
October 29, 1997 | By Heather Moore, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Buck Hotel has closed. Again. The Feasterville hotel was built in 1735 as a tavern. It has gone through three owners in the last 10 years - one of whom was ordered by a Bucks County judge to pay more than $11,000 to make good on bad checks and to pay restitution to a client who lost wedding and banquet deposits when the former owner abruptly closed the hotel on New Year's Day 1993. Associations with those details of the hotel's past life have forced it to close, said Steven Senopoulos, president of J.J.A.
NEWS
September 23, 2005 | By Pat Rakowski
While I sorted through my sun-and-sand vacation photos one morning, I started to wonder why we take photographs. And why I feel so compelled to keep them. Several times a year, I go through the ritual of writing people's names, places and dates on the back of the photos and placing them in the latest of the many albums I've collected. For as long as I can remember, my mother carefully saved and arranged her children's baby pictures, school photos, and scenes of family activities.
NEWS
August 13, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Columnist
After a triumphant landing, the Curiosity rover is ready to search Mars for signs of past life or suitability for life. Several readers have raised concerns that NASA scientists might fail to recognize life if it isn't based on carbon or is otherwise radically different from our kind of life. It's true that biologists don't have a single agreed-upon definition of life, and often end up with a laundry list of characteristics instead. That's been a concern for NASA, and so in the 1990s, the space agency convened a panel to try to define life, said Steve Benner, a biologist from the Foundation for Applied Molecular Evolution (FfAME)
SPORTS
March 19, 1998 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The way Maryland point guard Terrell Stokes figures it, youth left him at an early age. "I just grew up faster than everybody else. . . . Believe it or not, I was grown up at 11 years old," Stokes, a Gratz graduate from Philadelphia, said yesterday. He went on to volunteer why this was so: "I was selling drugs at 11, making two or three thousand a night. . . . I was one of the youngest, biggest drug dealers in Philadelphia at the time. " After he was arrested while in junior high and sent to the Sleighton School, a youth correctional facility in Delaware County, Stokes said he vowed to leave the street life behind.
NEWS
August 27, 2001 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As church suppers go, the potluck at Pebble Hill Church in Doylestown was thoroughly traditional: Folks at picnic tables ate chicken, barbecued ribs, baked beans, and peach-blueberry pie. But this was not exactly a typical church crowd. The talk on this sultry summer night in Bucks County was about past lives, spirit guides, angels, spaceships, and the future of the universe. "We believe universal brotherhood has to be extended to other worlds," said Lynn Volpe of New Hope, who along with her husband, Anthony, has a special interest in UFOs.
NEWS
December 24, 2002 | By Lisa B. Samalonis
Gene Autry has long since invaded my house. So have Burl Ives, Bing Crosby, Johnny Mathis, Dolly Parton, Ella Fitzgerald and Celine Dion. It wasn't even Thanksgiving before the radio went on full blast, courtesy of my husband and the 24-hour holiday music format of WSNI-FM ("Sunny" 104.5). By late November, I was already feeling anything but "sunny. " So reluctantly I gave up the fight and surrendered to the "delightful holiday music. " My sons emulate their father - who I am convinced was Santa in a past life - and rock back and forth to "Jingle Bell Rock.
SPORTS
February 23, 1999 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
If you're going to take a risk in the NBA, take a 7-3 risk. That was true all the way back to Utah taking a shot with 7-5 auto mechanic Mark Eaton, the 76ers making 7-6 Shawn Bradley the No. 2 pick in the draft, Don Nelson being fascinated with 7-7 Dinka tribesman Manute Bol. And that is how Cleveland Cavaliers general manager Wayne Embry has always looked at Zydrunas Ilgauskas, the 7-3 Lithuanian center who is out for the remainder of the season...
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 22, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Philly.com Staff Writer
You know it. The election is still fresher than that can of cranberry sauce you're gonna crack open. So, Thanksgiving Day, there's a solid shot some in-law is going to try to pry someone's mind or mouth open to discuss one of the most bitterly fought political contests in four score and 20 years. Beware. Do not take the bait. Instead, have handy some dandy defections. The more mind-boggling the better. Seriously. No subject is safe. The weather? "I'm &%$@# sick of hearing about climate change," Uncle Fred might bellow.
NEWS
August 13, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Columnist
After a triumphant landing, the Curiosity rover is ready to search Mars for signs of past life or suitability for life. Several readers have raised concerns that NASA scientists might fail to recognize life if it isn't based on carbon or is otherwise radically different from our kind of life. It's true that biologists don't have a single agreed-upon definition of life, and often end up with a laundry list of characteristics instead. That's been a concern for NASA, and so in the 1990s, the space agency convened a panel to try to define life, said Steve Benner, a biologist from the Foundation for Applied Molecular Evolution (FfAME)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Columnist
If we found life on another planet, the discovery would go a long way toward answering the deepest open questions in biology: How did life originate, how widespread is life in the universe, and are there alternative recipes for life? There's no obvious sign of life on any of our neighbors in the solar system. But desolate, frozen Mars keeps calling scientists back. In the Martian landscape, geologists see dry riverbeds and floodplains that hint at a warmer past that just might have allowed life to originate.
NEWS
May 18, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
Light just ain't what it used to be. So it is that Lights of Liberty, the sound-and-light show that has run in Independence National Historical Park and environs every summer since 1999, is getting pixilated. As part of the $10 million project, Historic Philadelphia Inc. - the nonprofit that runs the show and other area attractions - also will construct a 3-D, 360-degree theater as part of new headquarters space carved out on the ground floor of the Public Ledger Building at Sixth and Chestnut Streets, officials announced at a news conference Monday.
NEWS
July 20, 2008 | By Karin Kasdin FOR THE INQUIRER
Gerald Shur has spent a lifetime trying to understand the criminal mind. The Bucks County resident has never been short on research subjects. Shur was the mastermind behind the creation of the federal witness-protection program, and throughout his 34 years with the Department of Justice, he thrust himself into the lives of the most vicious kingpins of organized crime in America. Now retired, Shur, 74, can finally talk about his past, the program he founded, and the veil of secrecy under which he lived most of his adult life.
NEWS
November 20, 2007 | Reviewed by Maxine Clarke, For The Inquirer
The Reincarnationist By M. J. Rose Mira. 458 pp. $24.95 Thirty years ago, a little-known author wrote a best seller that defined a new genre. Robin Cook's Coma was an exciting story about a young female medical student who uncovers a transplant scandal. It later came out that Cook had carefully analyzed the best-seller lists and identified about 20 key common features. He mixed these into one book, and the rest was history. Of course, it wasn't as simple as all that: A doctor himself, Cook is an excellent writer, and was strongly motivated by his desire to highlight in a popular fashion the problem - then little-appreciated - of organ supply at a time when transplant technology was just becoming routine.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2007
WANT TO GET to know someone new and, more importantly, someone who's also single and available? It'll be easier than ever this time around because we've expanded this year's bachelor and bachelorette roundup to include not only our usual photo spread but also online video profiles. That's right. This year, besides having their picture appear in the Daily News , each Sexy Single stars in his or her own personal video. You can watch the behind-the-scenes action as they participate in a glamorous photo shoot in Atlantic City, hear them talk about their lives and special interests, and find out more about the qualities they're looking for in a relationship.
NEWS
September 29, 2005 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Karrine Steffans recounts in her bawdy memoir, Confessions of a Video Vixen, there were plenty of rock-bottom moments for a chick who lived completely over the top: drug-induced seizures, living in her car, being passed around like a collection plate. But now she's reveling in success: She has sold more than 100,000 books in three months, is happily dating political humorist Bill Maher, and is promoting her story as more cautionary than salacious. "It would be hypocritical to say you shouldn't go into the video industry at all," says Steffans, who will discuss her book at Warmdaddy's on Sunday.
NEWS
September 23, 2005 | By Pat Rakowski
While I sorted through my sun-and-sand vacation photos one morning, I started to wonder why we take photographs. And why I feel so compelled to keep them. Several times a year, I go through the ritual of writing people's names, places and dates on the back of the photos and placing them in the latest of the many albums I've collected. For as long as I can remember, my mother carefully saved and arranged her children's baby pictures, school photos, and scenes of family activities.
REAL_ESTATE
January 9, 2004 | By Sheila Dyan FOR THE INQUIRER
Some folks who live there say Sharples Works, crafted from a 19th-century dairy-processing plant, is the cr?me de la cr?me of local rental communities. "I think it's one of the best maintained properties in the area. The grounds are very beautiful . . . with so many different kinds of mature trees, and beautiful landscaping," said Sharon Paul, who is in her 50s. "What brought me here was the character of Sharples Works, which is an historic landmark. Much of the old creamery has been kept as it was in the old days - the brickwork, lots of beams, and the old woodwork in the apartments and the lobby.
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