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Pastry Chef

NEWS
February 10, 1995 | by Rick Selvin, Daily News Staff Writer
Whether it's one of those $6 orange cloths that soak up an entire spilled bottle of soda, or a $3,000 dining room table, or a $10,000 redwood deck, there's dreaming room for you at the Philadelphia Home Show. Back at the Civic Center for the 14th year in a row, the show is a gathering spot where more than 500 home-equipment vendors and builders show their latest products to thousands of residents who would rather "improve" than "move. " Next year the show itself moves - to the new Pennsylvania Convention Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2012
Bio : 35; from Ocean City, N.J.; lives in Philadelphia with his wife. Philly/Jersey restaurant connections: Avenue B, Café Loren, Fathom Seafood House, Fish, Little Fish and Washington Inn. Culinary training: Academy of Culinary Arts, Mays Landing, N.J. First restaurant gig: Age 13, as a busboy at Daniel's Restaurant in Somers Point, N.J. What's new? Mike sold Little Fish and Fathom Seafood House (now East Girard Gastropub) to their respective chefs de cuisine to focus on his newly expanded Fish (1234 Locust St., 215-545-9600, fishphilly.com )
FOOD
March 12, 1995 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
When the call went out for the Great Chefs of Philadelphia Dessert Competition, about 30 of the area's culinary elite gladly put their egos on the line and joined the contest. Their job was to wow the judges, some of whom came to town just for the special event, held at the Rittenhouse Hotel, and whose names could get the chocolate moving in the veins of most pastry chefs. There were Michael and Ariane Batterberry, publishers of Food Arts magazine; cookbook author Eileen Yin-Fei Lo; food historian William Woys Weaver; Diane Brown of the James Beard Foundation; Fred Ferretti, columnist for Gourmet magazine; Barbara Kafka, cookbook author and Vogue magazine writer; Louis Szathmary, founder of the Bakery Restaurant in Chicago; and Ann Amernick, an independent pastry chef.
LIVING
March 23, 1995 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
When Bobby Flay finished high school, he figured he'd had it with formal education. But even as he was putting away that hard-earned diploma, his father made it clear that if he didn't go to college, he would certainly have to work. To show that he meant business, the elder Flay went out and got the reluctant Manhattan youth a job in the kitchen of a restaurant in the theater district. Flay remembers the times he was late for work and when he arrived, his father would be waiting for him in front of the restaurant.
FOOD
September 29, 2011 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
The restaurant space at the Wayne Hotel in downtown Wayne, once the home of Restaurant Taquet, has been expanded and renovated into a dining room and bistro bar called Paramour (139 E. Lancaster Ave., 610-977-0600). As part of the two-year renovation to the hotel, developer S.W. Bajus has also set up an outdoor veranda and a lobby lounge. The bistro has plush semicircular banquettes and floor-to-ceiling windows, and the main dining room - now allowing for plenty of natural light - has an open kitchen, marble floors, and an enormous glass-walled wine display.
NEWS
April 12, 2012
Husband-wife veterans Guy Shapiro and Luli Canuso have been around the block a time or two after meeting at the once-trendy Mirabelle on Callowhill Street in the 1980s. She was a pastry chef at Le Bec-Fin. He cooked for Russian mobsters, among other employers. Now they have set up on a sunny corner near their Fairmount house with BlueCat (1921 Fairmount Ave., 267-519-2911). Named in homage to the couple's pussycat - who Canuso says "is a domestic gray but thinks he is a Russian blue" - the BYOB features modern Latin fare at modest prices.
NEWS
July 21, 2011 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Perhaps there's another Egyptian-born, French-trained chef somewhere in South Jersey, but only one shares skills he learned in Paris with parolees in Camden. "I've worked in four-star restaurants," says Galal Moin, citing stints at Maxim's and several major hotels on the continent. "But this is the most important job of my life. " After four decades of working in Europe and the United States, Moin (pronounced moyne ) essentially came out of retirement to supervise culinary arts and catering programs at Respond Inc. He had intended to stay three months but has been executive chef at the nonprofit human-services agency for almost two years.
NEWS
December 21, 2003 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Terrace Restaurant at Longwood Gardens brings to mind those informal but genteel eateries one often finds in a major art museum. The decor is understated here, and the cuisine has the civilized trappings, from the fris?e salad to the caramel apple tart. There are actually two restaurants at the Terrace: a cafe/buffet and a linen-and-candlelight, fine-dining room. Still, the style is casual, in part because the service is neighborhood-bar friendly. "We're sort of the back-end of the gardens," executive chef Frank Perko said.
NEWS
April 22, 2002 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
If you yearn to visit England but don't want to journey across the "pond," Alison Black has a solution. In December, the native of Kingston-on-Thames opened Mulberry Tearooms, a restaurant at 60 S. Main St. in Medford that looks like an English outpost right down to the nine tea varieties, scones, shortbreads, cream meringues and pasties (a potato and cheese concoction) on the menu; the china tea cups on the sideboard; and a de rigueur picture of the queen on the wall. Queen Victoria, that is. For a picture of her great-great-granddaughter Elizabeth at her coronation in 1952, you'll have to visit the restroom.
FOOD
February 9, 2006 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When, in the course of eating my way through a holiday, it becomes necessary to have dessert, I always go for the chocolate. Dark, rich, imported chocolate - served up liquidy for dipping, baked buttery in cake, squared and stuffed with nuts. Let Thanksgiving keep its pumpkin pie. Christmas can take back the fruitcake. Easter candy's for kids. Chocolate is the raison d'etre on Valentine's Day - an otherwise brutal holiday that demands not just a date but a sweetheart, not just dinner but a romantic interlude, not a mere sweater but red lingerie with a matching edible thong.
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