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Pat Chapman

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SPORTS
May 24, 2011 | By DICK JERARDI, jerardd@phillynews.com
YORK, Pa. - The stall the great horse left at Philadelphia Park in the summer of 2004 is 108 miles from the stall he occupies now at Ghost Ridge Farms. Get on the Pennsylvania Turnpike in Bensalem, cruise out to Exit 286, head south 20 miles on Route 222 to Lancaster, cut another 20 miles southwest to York on Route 30 while crossing the Susquehanna, get off at the Pa. 462 exit, take a left on Kreutz Creek Road (State Route 2001), pass the Frosty Freeze, continue as the name changes to Freysville Road, make a right on Ness Road, another right on Dietz Road and there, on the left, the now 10-year-old horse resides, living a very nice life, sharing a road with a suburban subdivision and a barn with three stallions that make Ghost Ridge the home of the best sires outside of Kentucky.
SPORTS
May 1, 2005 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Their Ford minivan has a magnetized sign on the side with the words Someday Farm. For the longest time last year, Roy and Pat Chapman kept the name of their old farm off their van, preferring to drive around the Philadelphia suburbs anonymously. "For quite a while - for months," Pat Chapman said. "I didn't want rotten tomatoes thrown at it. " It was just last spring, of course, when their colt, Smarty Jones, was the sensation of horse racing and, for a brief time, became almost the national pet as he sought the Triple Crown.
SPORTS
October 27, 2010 | By DICK JERARDI, jerardd@phillynews.com
Smarty Jones has been a major attraction in Kentucky horse country since he arrived at Three Chimneys Farm in August 2004. But the 2004 Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner, who was born in Chester County and stabled at what was then known as Philadelphia Park, will be coming back to Pennsylvania in the next few weeks. The now 9-year-old horse will stand stud at Ghost Ridge Farm in York in 2011. Pat Chapman and her late husband Roy owned Smarty. After he was retired, they sold 50 percent of the horse to a syndicate of breeders.
SPORTS
May 1, 2005 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Billy Valentine already had struck a deal with Smarty Jones' connections to write the authorized story of last year's Kentucky Derby winner. Valentine thought it was a pretty good idea when co-owner Pat Chapman suggested he read some of the letters written to Smarty. "I didn't know there were 1.2 million letters," he said. He started reading them, all of them, he said, boxes and boxes of them, in the Chapmans' house. They also filled up an entire room in John Servis' basement.
SPORTS
February 18, 2006 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Roy Chapman, 79, the owner of a group of Philadelphia car dealerships who became famous late in his life for owning a horse named Smarty Jones, died yesterday morning at his home in Doylestown of complications from emphysema. Mr. Chapman may be best remembered for scaring a national television audience watching the 2004 Kentucky Derby. Viewers saw this man in a wheelchair, tethered to a steady oxygen supply, grab at his heart and gasp for breath right after Smarty Jones won the race.
SPORTS
November 8, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
The mother of Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner Smarty Jones was sold for $5 million yesterday at the Fasig-Tipton November Selected Sale in Lexington, Ky. I'll Get Along was sold to Olin Gentry and Thomas Gaines. The 12-year-old bay mare is now in foal to Elusive Quality, the sire of Smarty Jones. "When I looked at the mare, I saw Smarty Jones written all over her," said Gaines, a son of thoroughbred breeder and Breeders' Cup founder John R. Gaines. "That's what I love about her. " I'll Get Along will give birth to a full sibling to Smarty Jones next year.
SPORTS
May 16, 2004 | By Ron Reid INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
NBC Sports overcame a few minor glitches to deliver a compelling and exciting telecast of Smarty Jones' runaway triumph yesterday in the 129th Preakness Stakes. Philadelphia fans can argue among themselves that the horse race was more or less exciting than the Flyers' playoff victory against Tampa Bay, but few performers ever gave an audience sheer joy of the intensity Smarty Jones did with his extraordinary surge down the stretch. That incredible finish, which challenged NBC cameramen to keep the rest of the field in the picture, moved Tom Durkin, who called the race, to exclaim: "The Philadelphia story continues!
SPORTS
August 3, 2004 | By Craig Donnelly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Horse racing is a brutally competitive game, and on the backstretch of any racetrack jealously and deception are as common as oats and water. But nobody ever seemed to have anything but glowing remarks about Smarty Jones and his connections ever since the best horse to ever compete at Philadelphia Park began his Triple Crown campaign in the spring. Philadelphia Park has long held a reputation as a gambling factory, where claimers battle daily, and the "good horses" are to be seen only on simulcasts from across the nation.
SPORTS
September 10, 2004 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Smarty Jones, living the good life on his Kentucky retirement farm, is about to have some important visitors, with cash in their pockets and mares ready to meet him. Over the next couple of weeks, well-connected breeders interested in having a mare mate with the recently retired Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner will stop by to take a look at him. Yesterday, Three Chimneys Farm in Midway, Ky., announced how much Smarty's services will...
SPORTS
September 24, 2011 | BY DICK JERARDI, jerardd@phillynews.com
HOW TODAY'S $1 million Pennsylvania Derby at Parx Racing will be run is not hard to imagine. How it will be won is more difficult to ascertain. The pace in the mile-and-an-eighth should be realistic, but something short of enervating. The contenders are represented by every style. There really should be no excuses. Rush Now is going to the front. The very talented To Honor and Serve should be right behind the frontrunner. Belmont Stakes winner Ruler On Ice, who should relish what is almost certain to be a sloppy track, should be sitting on a nice trip somewhere near the rail.
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SPORTS
September 4, 2013 | BY DICK JERARDI, Daily News Staff Writer jerardd@phillynews.com
NEARLY 10 YEARS from the day Smarty Jones ran the first race of his life at what was then Philadelphia Park, the star of the show on Smarty Jones Day at Parx Racing yesterday was Stewart Elliott. It was Elliott who rode Smarty in November 2003 until June 2004, when the horse nearly became the second unbeaten winner of the Triple Crown. On Labor Day, Elliott won the $350,000 Turf Monster on a 28-1 shot and followed that 30 minutes later by winning the featured race of the day on the favorite, a mile-and-70-yard, $350,000 race for 3-year-olds, the Smarty Jones Stakes.
SPORTS
September 24, 2011 | BY DICK JERARDI, jerardd@phillynews.com
HOW TODAY'S $1 million Pennsylvania Derby at Parx Racing will be run is not hard to imagine. How it will be won is more difficult to ascertain. The pace in the mile-and-an-eighth should be realistic, but something short of enervating. The contenders are represented by every style. There really should be no excuses. Rush Now is going to the front. The very talented To Honor and Serve should be right behind the frontrunner. Belmont Stakes winner Ruler On Ice, who should relish what is almost certain to be a sloppy track, should be sitting on a nice trip somewhere near the rail.
SPORTS
May 24, 2011 | By DICK JERARDI, jerardd@phillynews.com
YORK, Pa. - The stall the great horse left at Philadelphia Park in the summer of 2004 is 108 miles from the stall he occupies now at Ghost Ridge Farms. Get on the Pennsylvania Turnpike in Bensalem, cruise out to Exit 286, head south 20 miles on Route 222 to Lancaster, cut another 20 miles southwest to York on Route 30 while crossing the Susquehanna, get off at the Pa. 462 exit, take a left on Kreutz Creek Road (State Route 2001), pass the Frosty Freeze, continue as the name changes to Freysville Road, make a right on Ness Road, another right on Dietz Road and there, on the left, the now 10-year-old horse resides, living a very nice life, sharing a road with a suburban subdivision and a barn with three stallions that make Ghost Ridge the home of the best sires outside of Kentucky.
SPORTS
October 27, 2010 | By DICK JERARDI, jerardd@phillynews.com
Smarty Jones has been a major attraction in Kentucky horse country since he arrived at Three Chimneys Farm in August 2004. But the 2004 Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner, who was born in Chester County and stabled at what was then known as Philadelphia Park, will be coming back to Pennsylvania in the next few weeks. The now 9-year-old horse will stand stud at Ghost Ridge Farm in York in 2011. Pat Chapman and her late husband Roy owned Smarty. After he was retired, they sold 50 percent of the horse to a syndicate of breeders.
SPORTS
September 7, 2010 | By DICK JERARDI, jerardd@phillynews.com
Labor Day has been "the" day at Philadelphia Park for years. Only the track is now Parx Racing and the Pennsylvania Derby has been moved back 3 weeks. Well, a big crowd still arrived yesterday. What the crowd did experience was a perfect afternoon, the renovated first floor, a renovated but not quite finished third floor, 107 horses competing in 12 races, including maiden races with $68,000 purses, allowances with $72,000 purses, a $15,000 claimer with a $39,000 purse, one stakes with a $250,000 purse and another with a $300,000 purse.
SPORTS
August 26, 2010 | By DICK JERARDI, jerardd@phillynews.com
Smarty Jones left Pennsylvania for Kentucky in August 2004. The 2004 Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner could be coming back to the state where he was born before the year ends. "I want him in Pennsylvania," said Smarty's owner, Pat Chapman. "It just depends on [finding the right farm] and the right partners, work out some financial things. I would like to see it happen. " There is very little patience in the breeding world, even less in an economy that really has hit horse racing hard.
SPORTS
April 30, 2010 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - When trainer Tom Amoss found out last year he would be working with a colt sired by Smarty Jones, he couldn't wait for the van to arrive at his Churchill Downs barn. "Smarty was such a good-looking and refined horse and obviously very smart," Amoss said Thursday as he sorted out training schedules in a small stable office just a few yards from his horses. "I had worked as an analyst for the Derby the year he won and he was my pick. I visited [trainer] John Servis the day after the race just to meet Smarty.
SPORTS
July 21, 2008 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Qualifier Aleksandra Wozniak became the first Canadian to win a WTA Tour singles title in 20 years, taking advantage of an injury to Marion Bartoli to win the Bank of the West Classic, 7-5, 6-3, yesterday in Stanford, Calif. Wozniak, 20, needed to win eight matches - including three qualifiers - in nine days to become the first Canadian since Jill Hetherington at Wellington in February 1988 to win a women's singles title. Wozniak was only 5 months old at the time. Wozniak benefited Saturday when Serena Williams pulled out from the semifinals with a knee injury.
SPORTS
February 18, 2006 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Roy Chapman, 79, the owner of a group of Philadelphia car dealerships who became famous late in his life for owning a horse named Smarty Jones, died yesterday morning at his home in Doylestown of complications from emphysema. Mr. Chapman may be best remembered for scaring a national television audience watching the 2004 Kentucky Derby. Viewers saw this man in a wheelchair, tethered to a steady oxygen supply, grab at his heart and gasp for breath right after Smarty Jones won the race.
SPORTS
May 1, 2005 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Billy Valentine already had struck a deal with Smarty Jones' connections to write the authorized story of last year's Kentucky Derby winner. Valentine thought it was a pretty good idea when co-owner Pat Chapman suggested he read some of the letters written to Smarty. "I didn't know there were 1.2 million letters," he said. He started reading them, all of them, he said, boxes and boxes of them, in the Chapmans' house. They also filled up an entire room in John Servis' basement.
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