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Pat Croce

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BUSINESS
October 23, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you want to own a piece of 76ers basketball history, here's a chance: Former team president Pat Croce's 10,500-square-foot Villanova mansion will be auctioned to the highest bidder Saturday. Anyone can participate in the auction for Croce's property, according to Michael Schwartz, director of national sales for Premiere Estates Auction Co. of Manhattan Beach, Calif., which is running the event. But all bidders have to put up an "entry fee" deposit of $150,000 by cashier's check or wire ahead of time.
SPORTS
June 19, 2011 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Sports Columnist
Pat Croce remains busy. He recently bought another bar in Key West, Fla., and he also finished a new children's book about pirates. His head long ago moved on to other matters, even if part of his heart stayed behind. It's been 10 years since Croce stepped down as the 76ers president, and longer still since he allied with Ed Snider and Comcast-Spectacor to seize control of the franchise from Harold Katz, but he never stopped following the team that he helped push to its last Finals appearance.
SPORTS
April 4, 2001 | by Phil Jasner Daily News Sports Writer
Now we know why Pat Croce hurriedly changed his plans Jan. 12 and rushed to Washington, where the 76ers were visiting the Wizards. He felt a deep need to apologize to Allen Iverson. That was the final chapter in a series of events that left Croce, the Sixers' president and part-owner, numb. He was, in no particular order, angry, disappointed, humiliated and discouraged. That was the day Croce learned that his younger brother John, the Sixers' physical conditioning coach, had been caught on videotape taking money from the pants pocket of Iverson.
NEWS
April 1, 1996 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
He's broken his nose five times. Had his front four teeth knocked out. Cracked his heel. Broken his neck. The knuckles on his right hand - which has been broken in seven places - resemble a section of one of those beaded car seats. Pat Croce knows pain, which is probably a good thing if you're going to take over the 76ers. The newly crowned prince of Philadelphia sport is just getting acquainted with the assets that come with his reported $5 million investment - a 13-56 basketball team with a few good men and enough bad habits to fill a wing in the Betty Ford clinic.
NEWS
July 27, 2001 | By Jerry Long
Sometimes you carpe the diem, and sometimes the diem carpes you. Pat Croce is gone. And now, for us Philadelphia sports fans looking to identify with the moneyed personages who run our beloved franchises, we have only the zany, madcap antics of Phillies president David Montgomery - whose idea of edginess no doubt consists of eating lobster bisque with a demitasse spoon. The single greatest service Croce gave to fans was his air of treating us all as if we were his partners, and not the powerless herd we really are. He was a regular guy. Yes, a shrewd multimillionaire regular guy . . . but I would rather have an owner who rappels from the rafters to show his gratitude for our money than one who sits in his suite expecting our money while repelled by the notion of gratitude.
SPORTS
December 7, 2012 | BY MARK PERNER,, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
Sixth in a series of 25 THE SETUP: The Sixers were coming off a 6-year freefall in which their victory total dropped each season. The franchise was on life support and it needed an infusion of vitality. Enter Pat Croce. WHEN IT came to being a pro sports franchise president, Pat Croce was a neophyte. Oh sure, he proved that he was one hell of an entrepreneur, turning his physical therapy business into a $40 million pay day. But his strengths were his boyish charm, his charisma and his persistence.
SPORTS
April 12, 1996 | By Raad Cawthon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As the strains of Jimi Hendrix's late-'60s acid rock bounced around the Spectrum during a time-out at the 76ers-Nets game, Pat Croce was trying to figure out exactly what kind of purple haze was running through the head of the person choosing the music. Croce, the Sixers' president-to-be, was at Monday's game, critiquing each time-out. Was the music too loud? Yes. Were the songs the type that would help pump up a crowd? No. "It was 70-70," Croce said. "I'm thinking, 'Why Jimi Hendrix?
SPORTS
February 22, 1997 | By Raad Cawthon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Johnny Davis, the embattled coach of the Sixers, expressed how he felt yesterday about blistering comments made by a group of season-ticket holders Thursday night. "I don't have time to wallow or engage in self-pity," he said. "I'm too busy for that. " Davis was the object of much criticism by the 210 fans who attended a pregame meeting at the CoreStates Center with team president Pat Croce and general manager Brad Greenberg before the Sixers broke a five-game losing streak by beating the Los Angeles Clippers.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1993 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fitness guru Pat Croce is going national. The popular trainer and businessman announced yesterday that he has sold his SPORTS Physical Therapists chain of rehabilitation centers to RehabClinics Inc., a King of Prussia company with nearly 180 rehab centers in 22 states. Croce's Bryn Mawr company owns or manages 40 outpatient centers in 11 states. The energetic Croce, best known as a trainer for local professional sports teams, will become executive vice president for marketing and sales of RehabClinics.
NEWS
March 29, 1996 | By Angela Paik, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Pat Croce doesn't waste time. Over the weekend, the new president and part-owner of the 76ers was flooded with letters from students at his alma mater, St. Charles Borromeo. They congratulated him on his giant business venture and invited him to come home. By Monday, he was on the phone to Sister Mary Hickey, telling her he wanted to meet the students whose letters had touched him. Yesterday, he swept into the Drexel Hill school like a tornado, the students barely having had time to hang the red-and-blue balloons and banners that welcomed him. He arrived early, spoke for 15 minutes about persistence and motivation, then signed a few autographs, posed for pictures, and reminisced with the children of his former classmates.
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NEWS
February 20, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
In a banquet room at West Chester University, more than 250 students, faculty, alumni, and others focused on their breathing as they inhaled and exhaled, appreciated the gravity holding them to the Earth, and silently acknowledged their fellow human beings. "It sounds a little 'woo woo,' " Pat Croce said, "but truly, we're all here. We're all mindful. " Croce, former 76ers owner, Philadelphia icon, and entrepreneur, said he discovered mindfulness last year, after he turned 60 and stopped to take stock of his life.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you want to own a piece of 76ers basketball history, here's a chance: Former team president Pat Croce's 10,500-square-foot Villanova mansion will be auctioned to the highest bidder Saturday. Anyone can participate in the auction for Croce's property, according to Michael Schwartz, director of national sales for Premiere Estates Auction Co. of Manhattan Beach, Calif., which is running the event. But all bidders have to put up an "entry fee" deposit of $150,000 by cashier's check or wire ahead of time.
SPORTS
May 21, 2014 | BY JAKE KAPLAN, Daily News Staff Writer kaplanj@phillynews.com
AS THE Heat and Pacers get ready to play tonight in Indianapolis for Game 2 of the Eastern Conference finals, the collective attention of viewers will shift 700 miles east to the Times Square Studios. Back in the Delaware Valley, basketball fans will restlessly anticipate the opening of 14 envelopes, one by one, and pray for just a bit of luck. The bounce of a pingpong ball can change the complexion of a franchise, a truth verified countless times over 29 years of NBA draft lotteries.
SPORTS
November 7, 2013 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
THERE WERE some heavy hearts and teary eyes around the 76ers organization yesterday morning as the team gathered for practice. It had nothing to do with Monday's loss to the Golden State Warriors, which snapped a three-game winning streak. It was much more serious than that. Last week, the likes of Julius Erving, Moses Malone, Charles Barkley, Allen Iverson, Billy Cunningham, Doug Collins, Bobby Jones, Pat Croce, Wali Jones and others converged in a back room of the Wells Fargo Center to pay tribute to Jeff Millman, a 50-year employee of the organization whose jobs varied from ballboy to equipment manager, but whose undeniable fingerprints on the club couldn't be given a title.
SPORTS
November 1, 2013 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
IMAGINE YOU are on a park bench and this guy sits next to you and begins to talk. He tells you he was there that night in Hershey when Wilt scored 100, tells you he even had the 100-point ball in his possession before he wrapped it in a bunch of towels and stuffed it in The Dipper's gym bag. You nod and smile a patronizing smile. And then he starts to tell you about that time on the White House lawn, when he was again in charge of the ball, this one signed by every member of the 1983 NBA champion Philadelphia 76ers, how he was just doing his job when President Reagan came out, took the ball from him, clowned around and shook his hand.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Editor's Note: This column is sponsored by TD Bank. The opinions and analysis expressed here reflect the views of the authors alone, and do not necessarily reflect the views of TD Bank, N.A. or its affiliates. Bryn Davis ate his way to entrepreneurship. Davis, who lives in Horsham, says he entered college a "lean-as-you-can-imagine" 170 pounds. By his junior year, he was stressing the scales at 240. A doctor scared him into committing to a healthier lifestyle. Davis took it one step further: He started a business featuring only healthy fast food.
SPORTS
December 7, 2012 | BY MARK PERNER,, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
Sixth in a series of 25 THE SETUP: The Sixers were coming off a 6-year freefall in which their victory total dropped each season. The franchise was on life support and it needed an infusion of vitality. Enter Pat Croce. WHEN IT came to being a pro sports franchise president, Pat Croce was a neophyte. Oh sure, he proved that he was one hell of an entrepreneur, turning his physical therapy business into a $40 million pay day. But his strengths were his boyish charm, his charisma and his persistence.
SPORTS
October 28, 2012
Q: Who do you think I should vote for and why? - Undecided Subway Rider   A: Who? For what? President? Senator? Attorney General? Dog catcher? Captain of your subway car? Dude, you have to do better than that. Give a clue. Get a clue! Elections are important on so many levels. Your vote is your voice. It's important that you make thoughtful decisions on the issues and candidates before you go into the voting booth. Don't be swayed by what I think or the opinions of anybody else.
SPORTS
June 28, 2012 | John Smallwood
THIS WASN'T a good plan. Rod Thorn should not run the Sixers' draft on Thursday. Since ownership already decided Thorn ultimately would be out as president of basketball operations, it already should have hired his successor — not wait possibly up to a year while conducting its search process. Truthfully, the owners should have just put head coach Doug Collins in charge of all basketball-related decisions — as Pat Croce did when he hired Larry Brown as coach in 1997.
SPORTS
February 12, 2012 | By Bill Lyon, For The Inquirer
He always did have a craving for ice and rarely hesitated to indulge it. That ice is melting now. So diamonds, it turns out, really are not forever. A Georgia judge has ordered Allen Ezail Iverson to pay a jeweler about $860,000. But apparently he can't, so his bank account has been commandeered, and his earnings, whatever of them may be left, are to be garnisheed. The King of Bling, it would seem, is about to become the Prince of Pawn. The man who is the best small scorer in the history of the NBA, who lit up Philadelphia nights with his pyrotechnic play, is said to have worked his way through the better part of - big inhale here - $150 million.
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