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Pat Toomey

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NEWS
April 15, 2012 | Kevin Ferris
In 2004, even many Republicans thought Pat Toomey was too extreme for the U.S. Senate. Toomey was a little-known, fiscally conservative congressman from Pennsylvania's Lehigh Valley taking on moderate Arlen Specter, who was seeking a fifth term. Yet the challenger almost won that Republican primary. Only strong backing from President George W. Bush and Senate colleague Rick Santorum saved Specter. Six years later, Toomey's call for a rematch scared Specter right out of the GOP. And still there were Republicans hoping for someone more "electable," such as moderate Tom Ridge, the former governor and Homeland Security director.
NEWS
April 23, 2004 | By State Reps. TERESA FORCIER, DENNIS LEH, DARYL METCALFE & SAMUEL ROHRER
ON TUESDAY, state Republicans have a very important choice between Rep. Pat Toomey and liberal incumbent Arlen Specter for the U.S. Senate. This will be the most closely watched Senate race in America. The fact that it will be very close is affirmed by Sen. Specter's wave of negative commercials in an effort to cloud the facts. We strongly encourage Republican voters not to be beguiled by the smoke and mirrors in Sen. Specter's ads, but to look at the records he and Rep. Toomey have compiled during their tenures in Washington.
NEWS
April 2, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Pat Toomey isn't named in the latest Quinnipiac Poll, but Pennsylvania's Republican senator probably likes it anyway. The poll, out Tuesday, showed Hillary Rodham Clinton's numbers sinking in Pennsylvania - a trend that could affect Toomey's 2016 reelection bid. The poll showed a sharp drop in Pennsylvanians' approval of Clinton, the Democrats' presidential front-runner in waiting. Her favorability stood at 48-47, according to the poll, down from 55-38 on Feb. 3. And her lead in the commonwealth has narrowed in head-to-head matchups against Republican hopefuls like Jeb Bush and Chris Christie.
NEWS
November 5, 2014 | By Chris Brennan
WE CALL IT the Daily News hot seat - a table at the Famous 4th Street Deli where Clout asks the city's politicians three questions each Election Day. The questions for yesterday's general-election crowd were: * Who will be the next mayor of Philadelphia? * Who will be the Democratic nominee to challenge U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey in 2016? * And will U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah be seeking a 12th term in the U.S. House in two years or fighting a federal indictment? Yes, we save the zinger for our final question.
NEWS
November 4, 2010 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
Those numbers from Philadelphia did not look good at all, and a ripple of alarm went through the war room late Tuesday. More Democrats than forecast had turned out to vote in the city, so aides to Republican U.S. Senate candidate Pat Toomey reworked their spreadsheets, looking for the path to victory. At 10 p.m., Democrat Joe Sestak was holding a sizable lead in the closely watched contest - until, bit by bit, Republican areas reported in with better margins than the Toomey team could have hoped.
NEWS
April 9, 2004 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the late 1970s, when inflation was rampant and memories of Watergate and the Vietnam War were still raw, Pat Toomey spent part of each school day in a high school history classroom quietly seething. It was the teacher who got under his skin. Too many lectures were about capitalism's failings, corruption in Washington, or how America was no better than the Soviet Union. None of it squared with Toomey's patriotic take on U.S. history or his budding conservative ideology. "I felt we were a great, great country, a great civilization," said Toomey, 42, who has represented the Lehigh Valley and parts of Montgomery County in the House of Representatives since 1999.
NEWS
April 15, 2013
Bipartisanship in Washington? A3. The case for wider background checks. Sen. Pat Toomey, D1. Gun deal passes for progress. Editorial, D4.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Sens. Robert P. Casey and Pat Toomey called Wednesday for an audit of every regional Veterans Affairs office nationwide - the latest round of scrutiny aimed at an agency already facing sharp questions for its management in Philadelphia and elsewhere. Under a bill unveiled by Pennsylvania's two senators and supported by members of a bipartisan working group cochaired by Casey, the nonpartisan Government Accountability Office would be required to review regional VA offices within a year of passage for "consistency" in decision-making, and to find and share best practices at facilities that are doing well.
NEWS
April 26, 2004
HARD-RIGHT Republicans are pushing loony conservative Pat Toomey, hoping to make an example of Sen. Arlen Specter. But dislodging a four-term senator because he has not always toed the ultra-conservative line would mean even fewer moderates in the party than the tiny remnant that remains. That would be a disaster for everyone, including Republicans.
NEWS
April 27, 2004
HARD-RIGHT Republicans are pushing loony conservative Pat Toomey, hoping to make an example of Sen. Arlen Specter. But dislodging a four-term senator because he has not always toed the ultra-conservative line would mean even fewer moderates in the party than the tiny remnant that remains. That would be a disaster for everyone, including Republicans.
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NEWS
May 8, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Sens. Robert P. Casey and Pat Toomey called Wednesday for an audit of every regional Veterans Affairs office nationwide - the latest round of scrutiny aimed at an agency already facing sharp questions for its management in Philadelphia and elsewhere. Under a bill unveiled by Pennsylvania's two senators and supported by members of a bipartisan working group cochaired by Casey, the nonpartisan Government Accountability Office would be required to review regional VA offices within a year of passage for "consistency" in decision-making, and to find and share best practices at facilities that are doing well.
NEWS
April 18, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Allentown Mayor Ed Pawlowski will run for the U.S. Senate, becoming the first Democrat to pose a primary challenge to former Rep. Joe Sestak, according to party leaders informed of his plans. Pawlowski is scheduled to announce his decision Friday. His plans were confirmed by Jim Burn, chairman of the Pennsylvania Democratic Party, and U.S. Rep. Robert Brady (D., Pa.), the party chair in Philadelphia. "He's a formidable candidate," Brady said. "He's a pretty quality guy. " Pawlowski is expected to run on his record as mayor of the state's third-largest city, which is enjoying an economic renaissance.
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By Jessica Parks and Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writers
Montgomery County Board of Commissioners Chairman Josh Shapiro declined to address reports Friday that he has been asked to run against Joe Sestak for Pat Toomey's U.S. Senate seat. Sources have told The Inquirer and the Associated Press that Senate Democratic leaders, including Chuck Schumer of New York and Jon Tester of Montana, have talked to Shapiro about joining the race. Asked about those talks Friday, Shapiro responded: "How about we talk about our county budget surplus instead?"
NEWS
April 2, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Pat Toomey isn't named in the latest Quinnipiac Poll, but Pennsylvania's Republican senator probably likes it anyway. The poll, out Tuesday, showed Hillary Rodham Clinton's numbers sinking in Pennsylvania - a trend that could affect Toomey's 2016 reelection bid. The poll showed a sharp drop in Pennsylvanians' approval of Clinton, the Democrats' presidential front-runner in waiting. Her favorability stood at 48-47, according to the poll, down from 55-38 on Feb. 3. And her lead in the commonwealth has narrowed in head-to-head matchups against Republican hopefuls like Jeb Bush and Chris Christie.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Sarah Smith and Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writers
Democrat Joe Sestak hopes to get to the U.S. Senate Forrest Gump-style: He's crisscrossing Pennsylvania, walking exactly 422 miles, in his effort to unseat Republican Pat Toomey. His campaign slogan, of course, is "Joe Sestak walks in your shoes. " Sestak, 63, formally announced his bid Wednesday morning in front of Independence Hall and about 75 supporters who braved a sprinkling rain. Dressed in white-and-gray high-top Reeboks, jeans, and a bomber jacket, Sestak said he's running because he's disgusted with Washington politicians.
NEWS
December 27, 2014
ISSUE | CARBON CONCERN Gas and hot air Regarding the fossil-fuel industry claims noted by Dana Milbank ("The 'benefits' of more CO2," Dec. 17): Yes, trees thrive on carbon dioxide, but they don't thrive on tornadoes, floods, and droughts. Ask the farmers in Southern California. I don't think they care too much for floods and tornadoes either. |Richard F. Spahr, Ambler Pipeline as neighbor Regarding those cheering the building of the Mariner East pipeline ("Summit's message: Pipeline key in shale-energy revolution," Dec. 7)
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Pat Toomey is up next. Republicans won control of the Senate Tuesday, but as Democrats look to quickly reclaim the majority, they see the Pennsylvania Republican as one of the country's most inviting targets, setting up what could be one of the hottest Senate races of 2016. Democrats are eager for a shot at Toomey after seeing him beat Joe Sestak by just two percentage points in 2010, even with the tea party wave behind him. They expect a more favorable playing field this time around, and (they hope)
NEWS
November 5, 2014 | By Chris Brennan
WE CALL IT the Daily News hot seat - a table at the Famous 4th Street Deli where Clout asks the city's politicians three questions each Election Day. The questions for yesterday's general-election crowd were: * Who will be the next mayor of Philadelphia? * Who will be the Democratic nominee to challenge U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey in 2016? * And will U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah be seeking a 12th term in the U.S. House in two years or fighting a federal indictment? Yes, we save the zinger for our final question.
NEWS
October 27, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - They're not on the ballot, but the stakes are still high on Nov. 4 for U.S. Sens. Pat Toomey, Bob Menendez, and Bob Casey. Control of the Senate hangs in the balance, with Republicans pushing to win the chamber and change the power structure for both national policy and individual senators. Menendez (D., N.J.) could lose his position as chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Toomey (R., Pa.) could enter the Senate majority for the first time, potentially boosting his agenda just as he gears up for reelection in 2016 - but also raising the prospect of a political balancing act as more confrontational GOP colleagues gain the footing to advance their ideas, too. Casey (D., Pa.)
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