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Pat Toomey

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NEWS
April 15, 2012 | Kevin Ferris
In 2004, even many Republicans thought Pat Toomey was too extreme for the U.S. Senate. Toomey was a little-known, fiscally conservative congressman from Pennsylvania's Lehigh Valley taking on moderate Arlen Specter, who was seeking a fifth term. Yet the challenger almost won that Republican primary. Only strong backing from President George W. Bush and Senate colleague Rick Santorum saved Specter. Six years later, Toomey's call for a rematch scared Specter right out of the GOP. And still there were Republicans hoping for someone more "electable," such as moderate Tom Ridge, the former governor and Homeland Security director.
NEWS
April 23, 2004 | By State Reps. TERESA FORCIER, DENNIS LEH, DARYL METCALFE & SAMUEL ROHRER
ON TUESDAY, state Republicans have a very important choice between Rep. Pat Toomey and liberal incumbent Arlen Specter for the U.S. Senate. This will be the most closely watched Senate race in America. The fact that it will be very close is affirmed by Sen. Specter's wave of negative commercials in an effort to cloud the facts. We strongly encourage Republican voters not to be beguiled by the smoke and mirrors in Sen. Specter's ads, but to look at the records he and Rep. Toomey have compiled during their tenures in Washington.
NEWS
July 9, 2015
PAT TOOMEY'S Running a TV ad in Philly about fighting child predators. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is running a TV ad for Toomey, "a true leader fighting for Pennsylvania. " Toomey just wrote an Inquirer opinion piece pushing his child-protection bill. It's a kidz-&-biz tour; the start of the freshman Republican senator's run for re-election - next year. But Toomey's not talking about it. He declined an interview. His campaign says he's focused on his legislation.
NEWS
April 2, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Pat Toomey isn't named in the latest Quinnipiac Poll, but Pennsylvania's Republican senator probably likes it anyway. The poll, out Tuesday, showed Hillary Rodham Clinton's numbers sinking in Pennsylvania - a trend that could affect Toomey's 2016 reelection bid. The poll showed a sharp drop in Pennsylvanians' approval of Clinton, the Democrats' presidential front-runner in waiting. Her favorability stood at 48-47, according to the poll, down from 55-38 on Feb. 3. And her lead in the commonwealth has narrowed in head-to-head matchups against Republican hopefuls like Jeb Bush and Chris Christie.
NEWS
November 4, 2010 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
Those numbers from Philadelphia did not look good at all, and a ripple of alarm went through the war room late Tuesday. More Democrats than forecast had turned out to vote in the city, so aides to Republican U.S. Senate candidate Pat Toomey reworked their spreadsheets, looking for the path to victory. At 10 p.m., Democrat Joe Sestak was holding a sizable lead in the closely watched contest - until, bit by bit, Republican areas reported in with better margins than the Toomey team could have hoped.
NEWS
November 5, 2014 | By Chris Brennan
WE CALL IT the Daily News hot seat - a table at the Famous 4th Street Deli where Clout asks the city's politicians three questions each Election Day. The questions for yesterday's general-election crowd were: * Who will be the next mayor of Philadelphia? * Who will be the Democratic nominee to challenge U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey in 2016? * And will U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah be seeking a 12th term in the U.S. House in two years or fighting a federal indictment? Yes, we save the zinger for our final question.
NEWS
April 9, 2004 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the late 1970s, when inflation was rampant and memories of Watergate and the Vietnam War were still raw, Pat Toomey spent part of each school day in a high school history classroom quietly seething. It was the teacher who got under his skin. Too many lectures were about capitalism's failings, corruption in Washington, or how America was no better than the Soviet Union. None of it squared with Toomey's patriotic take on U.S. history or his budding conservative ideology. "I felt we were a great, great country, a great civilization," said Toomey, 42, who has represented the Lehigh Valley and parts of Montgomery County in the House of Representatives since 1999.
NEWS
April 15, 2013
Bipartisanship in Washington? A3. The case for wider background checks. Sen. Pat Toomey, D1. Gun deal passes for progress. Editorial, D4.
NEWS
April 26, 2004
HARD-RIGHT Republicans are pushing loony conservative Pat Toomey, hoping to make an example of Sen. Arlen Specter. But dislodging a four-term senator because he has not always toed the ultra-conservative line would mean even fewer moderates in the party than the tiny remnant that remains. That would be a disaster for everyone, including Republicans.
NEWS
April 27, 2004
HARD-RIGHT Republicans are pushing loony conservative Pat Toomey, hoping to make an example of Sen. Arlen Specter. But dislodging a four-term senator because he has not always toed the ultra-conservative line would mean even fewer moderates in the party than the tiny remnant that remains. That would be a disaster for everyone, including Republicans.
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NEWS
August 22, 2015
ISSUE | GMOS 'Only two decades' In supporting Monsanto's dream bill, the Inquirer Editorial Board is out of touch with the general public ("GMO panic is bad policy," Aug. 14). Polls have consistently shown that Americans support labeling of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food. That is because labeling genetically engineered ingredients, which have been on the market for only two decades, just makes sense. Consumers have a right to information about how food was produced before they buy it. The broad-based support for GMO labeling is the reason Connecticut, Vermont, and Maine have passed laws to require it. The Grocery Manufacturers Association and corporations such as Monsanto have bankrolled the effort to pass federal legislation nullifying the state laws.
NEWS
August 6, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Democrat Katie McGinty, the former chief of staff for Gov. Wolf, launched her campaign for the U.S. Senate on Tuesday, setting the stage for a hard-fought primary against former Rep. Joe Sestak as their party desperately tries to unseat the Republican incumbent, Pat Toomey. Her entry changes the dynamics of the primary and, potentially, the general election next year, a nationally watched race that could go a long way toward deciding control of the Senate. McGinty's candidacy - along with Hillary Rodham Clinton's for president - raises the prospect of having two women vying to make history atop the Democratic ticket, an idea sure to thrill some of the party's base.
NEWS
July 21, 2015
LET'S TAKE a peek inside Katie McGinty's tug of war. We know there is one. Otherwise she'd simply say, "I am not a candidate for U.S. Senate. " That would end speculation that started in May, after Montco Commissioner Josh Shapiro said he won't run against Republican Pat Toomey next year. So, just the fact that McGinty's not talking shows, as one source close to her put it, she's "seriously, seriously considering. " She needs to make a decision soon because as Gov. Wolf's chief of staff she's a distraction to the many distractions keeping the governor and GOP lawmakers from agreeing on a now three-week-late budget.
NEWS
July 21, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
ZIONSVILLE, Pa. - It's a gray early spring morning in the Lehigh Valley when Pat Toomey slides into the leather passenger seat of an aide's Ford Explorer. The Republican U.S. senator scans his itinerary, laid out meticulously in a white three-ring binder. A memo for each event lists a one-sentence "purpose," then background and talking points: "Great to Be Here With You Today," "Wawa's Leading by Example," "Overwhelming Bipartisan Support. " His planned speech honoring Sister Mary Scullion, the Philadelphia advocate for the homeless and mentally ill, includes pronunciation: SKULL-E-ON.
NEWS
July 9, 2015
PAT TOOMEY'S Running a TV ad in Philly about fighting child predators. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is running a TV ad for Toomey, "a true leader fighting for Pennsylvania. " Toomey just wrote an Inquirer opinion piece pushing his child-protection bill. It's a kidz-&-biz tour; the start of the freshman Republican senator's run for re-election - next year. But Toomey's not talking about it. He declined an interview. His campaign says he's focused on his legislation.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Sens. Robert P. Casey and Pat Toomey called Wednesday for an audit of every regional Veterans Affairs office nationwide - the latest round of scrutiny aimed at an agency already facing sharp questions for its management in Philadelphia and elsewhere. Under a bill unveiled by Pennsylvania's two senators and supported by members of a bipartisan working group cochaired by Casey, the nonpartisan Government Accountability Office would be required to review regional VA offices within a year of passage for "consistency" in decision-making, and to find and share best practices at facilities that are doing well.
NEWS
April 18, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Allentown Mayor Ed Pawlowski will run for the U.S. Senate, becoming the first Democrat to pose a primary challenge to former Rep. Joe Sestak, according to party leaders informed of his plans. Pawlowski is scheduled to announce his decision Friday. His plans were confirmed by Jim Burn, chairman of the Pennsylvania Democratic Party, and U.S. Rep. Robert Brady (D., Pa.), the party chair in Philadelphia. "He's a formidable candidate," Brady said. "He's a pretty quality guy. " Pawlowski is expected to run on his record as mayor of the state's third-largest city, which is enjoying an economic renaissance.
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By Jessica Parks and Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writers
Montgomery County Board of Commissioners Chairman Josh Shapiro declined to address reports Friday that he has been asked to run against Joe Sestak for Pat Toomey's U.S. Senate seat. Sources have told The Inquirer and the Associated Press that Senate Democratic leaders, including Chuck Schumer of New York and Jon Tester of Montana, have talked to Shapiro about joining the race. Asked about those talks Friday, Shapiro responded: "How about we talk about our county budget surplus instead?"
NEWS
April 2, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Pat Toomey isn't named in the latest Quinnipiac Poll, but Pennsylvania's Republican senator probably likes it anyway. The poll, out Tuesday, showed Hillary Rodham Clinton's numbers sinking in Pennsylvania - a trend that could affect Toomey's 2016 reelection bid. The poll showed a sharp drop in Pennsylvanians' approval of Clinton, the Democrats' presidential front-runner in waiting. Her favorability stood at 48-47, according to the poll, down from 55-38 on Feb. 3. And her lead in the commonwealth has narrowed in head-to-head matchups against Republican hopefuls like Jeb Bush and Chris Christie.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Sarah Smith and Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writers
Democrat Joe Sestak hopes to get to the U.S. Senate Forrest Gump-style: He's crisscrossing Pennsylvania, walking exactly 422 miles, in his effort to unseat Republican Pat Toomey. His campaign slogan, of course, is "Joe Sestak walks in your shoes. " Sestak, 63, formally announced his bid Wednesday morning in front of Independence Hall and about 75 supporters who braved a sprinkling rain. Dressed in white-and-gray high-top Reeboks, jeans, and a bomber jacket, Sestak said he's running because he's disgusted with Washington politicians.
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