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Patient Care

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NEWS
May 17, 1998 | By Laura Barnhardt and Jere Downs, FOR THE INQUIRER
On a trip to Washington last summer, Melissa Brown and her family were strolling through Arlington National Cemetery when politics and the national health-care debate came up. "Mom, do you know Pennsylvania's congressional delegation has no women?," Brown said her daughter Heather, then an intern with the Feminist Majority Foundation, asked. "I left the walk wondering if it would be a viable option to run for Congress, knowing women needed more representation," Brown said.
NEWS
October 8, 1987 | By Thomas Turcol, Inquirer Staff Writer
A freeholder-sponsored citizens' committee yesterday challenged recent assertions by two Camden County Democratic freeholders and the party organization that the quality of patient care at the county's Lakeland psychiatric hospital is poor. Reginald C. Stevenson, chairman of the committee, said in an interview that physicians who served on the panel "felt very, very good about the quality of care" at Lakeland. That assessment was included in a report the committee submitted to the freeholders three weeks ago, but there has been no sign that the freeholders have reviewed the report or plan to take any action on it, Stevenson said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The patient says he has been suffering from more asthma attacks, so a natural question is: Has he been faithfully taking his daily medicine? In another era, physicians would have to rely solely on the patient or the parent for that kind of information. Increasingly, these days they also can see on a computer screen if the pharmacy has provided a refill. That is the promise behind electronic medical records, which are becoming the norm in hospitals nationwide at the urging of the federal government.
NEWS
September 5, 1997 | By Christian Davenport, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Venting anger over the state's decision to close Haverford State Hospital and expressing concern for the 255 patients, about 50 employees and union members staged a demonstration yesterday outside the 239-acre campus. A petition to be sent to Gov. Ridge accuses the state of being "more concerned about the bottom line than providing quality patient care for Pennsylvania's most vulnerable citizens. " The state Department of Public Welfare, citing a declining patient population and rising costs, announced last month that the psychiatric hospital, which employs about 450 people, will close at the end of June.
NEWS
August 11, 2000 | By Lauren Mayk, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The union that represents more than 300 nurses at Rancocas Hospital is asking for state and national reviews of the facility. The hospital is "a hellhole for employees and now, we fear, a dangerous place for patients," union representatives said yesterday. They are seeking an injunction from the National Labor Relations Board to stop the latest round of layoffs at the hospital. Losing more employees, the union says, will exacerbate problems with staffing levels and jeopardize patient care.
NEWS
December 4, 1997 | By Andrea Gerlin and Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In a national battle of health titans, the American Medical Association is declaring war on the country's biggest managed-care insurer. The AMA on Tuesday released a blistering 11-page letter it sent Aetna U.S. Healthcare, accusing the Blue Bell company of interfering with doctors' decisions and compromising patient care. The trade group contended that the insurer was using its size to bully doctors into accepting one-sided contracts that prevent them from criticizing the health plan and from discussing treatment options not covered by the company.
NEWS
February 28, 2002 | By Will Van Sant INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
State health officials halted all admissions and surgical procedures at the Memorial Hospital of Salem County yesterday after inspections found problems with patient care and infection control. Patients can still be treated in Salem Memorial's emergency room under the state order, but they will have to be taken to other hospitals in the area for further treatment. Those already admitted at the hospital are not affected by the decision. The Department of Health and Senior Services notified the hospital's president and chief executive officer, Denise R. Williams, in a letter dated Feb. 27 that regularly scheduled inspections over the last two weeks had found "significant violations" across a wide range of services.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2010 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Do Strikes Kill? That is the provocative title of a study released last month that examined the quality of care in New York hospitals during 50 nursing strikes over two decades. The answer appeared to be yes. The authors, an MIT professor working with a Carnegie Mellon University student, found that in-hospital deaths rose by 19.4 percent and readmissions by 6.5 percent for patients treated during strikes. "This study provides some of the first analytical evidence on the effects of health-care strikes on patients, and suggests that hospitals functioning during nurses' strikes are doing so at a lower quality of patient care," the authors wrote in a working paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research.
NEWS
July 31, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, as hospitals cut costs to survive ever-increasing financial pressures, nurses argued that inadequate staffing harms patients. California's controversial and, so far, unique response was to mandate minimum nurse-to-patient ratios, which, if applied locally, would prevent 222 surgical deaths annually in New Jersey and 264 in Pennsylvania, researchers here calculated in 2010. Now members of that same University of Pennsylvania team say they have figured out a key reason for that.
NEWS
March 22, 1994 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
Hospital workers marched outside Hahnemann University Hospital yesterday. The demonstrators protested planned staff cuts that they said would destroy employee morale and undermine patient care.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 19, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harvey Mark Rosenwasser, 82, formerly of Center City, an optometrist who practiced in Philadelphia for 40 years before retiring to Florida in 1999, died Wednesday, July 8, at his Key Biscayne home. Dr. Rosenwasser had not been ill and his death was unexpected, said his wife, Ruth Kaback Rosenwasser. He collapsed from heart arrhythmia while working at his computer. It was Dr. Rosenwasser's habit to e-mail a daily dose of outrage over injustice, along with goofy jokes, to a wide circle of Internet friends.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Trish Henwood, the University of Pennsylvania emergency-room physician who twice went to Liberia to fight Ebola, says global intervention - albeit too late - still saved hundreds of thousands of lives. She also says the frantic reaction here showed U.S. leaders that improving health systems in fragile African nations is in our national security interest. Henwood, who gave Penn's annual Global Distinguished Lecture on Tuesday evening, told a rapt audience that fear too often trumped science and "definitely hampered the response . . . and led to more panic than preparedness.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF YOU WERE FEELING a bit low and you were fortunate enough to be related to or just a friend of Willie Lois Adams, you wouldn't be down for long. "No matter what may have been going on in the world to tear you down, it only took one smile, one kind word or one hug to make you feel rejuvenated again," her family said. Willie was known as Granny - "because of her loving and compassionate demeanor. Granny's warm heart spread love and cheer even to the casual acquaintance. Willie was truly a person who was loved by all. " She died Feb. 14 at age 96. Willie was born in Wake Forest, N.C., to Willie Dunn and Mary Land.
NEWS
November 12, 2014 | By Laura Weiss, Inquirer Staff Writer
The singer-songwriter Matt Duke stood at the end of Sandra Morello's bed in the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, strumming his acoustic guitar and belting out one of his own tunes, "Needle and Thread. " Her head wrapped in a purple bandanna, Morello nodded along. In her arm was an IV delivering an immunosuppressant drug. "To sing your blues away," he serenaded the 43-year-old cancer patient, "and hope for better days. " Morello smiled and clapped. "It definitely makes you feel good," she said.
NEWS
July 1, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN JASPER Palmer Jr. coached a girls softball team, he kept them motivated by telling them they hit like girls. Maybe it wasn't the smartest idea to humiliate his team members that way - sort of like Tom Hanks telling his women's team in "A League of Their Own" that there's no crying in baseball. However, Jasper's approach worked, for the most part. There was a marked reduction in "girlie" hitting on his team, which was part of a women's softball league. And when he coached a Little League team, the Mount Airy Bantams, he could bring a player up short with his familiar saying, "You eyeballing me, son?"
BUSINESS
June 14, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey will start selling two new health insurance plans for small businesses in July, with lower premiums and lower out-of-pocket costs if patients go to certain doctors, the Newark company said Thursday. When participants in the plans go to doctors who participate in a program that pays them more when they improve patient satisfaction and patient care, the patients will save money. Under the traditional model of care, doctors get paid more by providing more services.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia on Friday announced a $5 million gift from Giant Food Stores L.L.C. toward the $425 million Buerger Center for Advanced Pediatric Care under construction on the institution's University City campus. The hospital in June received a $50 million donation toward the outpatient center scheduled to open next year from CHOP trustee Reid Buerger and his family, which owns a Fort Washington financial services firm. In honor of Giant's 20-year's of support for CHOP, including $8.5 million through the Children's Miracle Network to support patient care at CHOP and to remodel the hospital's physical therapy gym, for a total of $13.5 million, the Buerger Center's 9,000 square-foot lobby will be called the Giant Lobby, CHOP said.
NEWS
October 13, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wayne W. Keller, 74, of Haverford, a Main Line cardiologist, died Thursday, Oct. 3, from complications of cancer at Bryn Mawr Hospital, where he had practiced for 41 years. Dr. Keller treated many prominent Philadelphians, including two surgeons general, sports figures, the inventor of the heart-lung machine, and business leaders. But he also valued the patients he treated who could not afford to pay. They returned his affection. "In Dad's last days, one patient wrote him and said that while she couldn't give him much, she would happily give him her blood or bone marrow if that would help him," said daughter Mimi Drake.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University Health System announced the elimination of 11 positions at Fox Chase Cancer Center and 14 at Jeanes Hospital. Officials said efforts were underway to find new jobs in the system for the affected employees, who came from management and nonmanagement ranks but were not involved in patient care. Fox Chase and Jeanes have a combined 3,500 employees. Those cutbacks, part of the integration of Fox Chase and Jeanes, followed a larger layoff last week at Einstein Health.
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