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Patient Care

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NEWS
May 17, 1998 | By Laura Barnhardt and Jere Downs, FOR THE INQUIRER
On a trip to Washington last summer, Melissa Brown and her family were strolling through Arlington National Cemetery when politics and the national health-care debate came up. "Mom, do you know Pennsylvania's congressional delegation has no women?," Brown said her daughter Heather, then an intern with the Feminist Majority Foundation, asked. "I left the walk wondering if it would be a viable option to run for Congress, knowing women needed more representation," Brown said.
NEWS
October 8, 1987 | By Thomas Turcol, Inquirer Staff Writer
A freeholder-sponsored citizens' committee yesterday challenged recent assertions by two Camden County Democratic freeholders and the party organization that the quality of patient care at the county's Lakeland psychiatric hospital is poor. Reginald C. Stevenson, chairman of the committee, said in an interview that physicians who served on the panel "felt very, very good about the quality of care" at Lakeland. That assessment was included in a report the committee submitted to the freeholders three weeks ago, but there has been no sign that the freeholders have reviewed the report or plan to take any action on it, Stevenson said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The patient says he has been suffering from more asthma attacks, so a natural question is: Has he been faithfully taking his daily medicine? In another era, physicians would have to rely solely on the patient or the parent for that kind of information. Increasingly, these days they also can see on a computer screen if the pharmacy has provided a refill. That is the promise behind electronic medical records, which are becoming the norm in hospitals nationwide at the urging of the federal government.
NEWS
September 5, 1997 | By Christian Davenport, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Venting anger over the state's decision to close Haverford State Hospital and expressing concern for the 255 patients, about 50 employees and union members staged a demonstration yesterday outside the 239-acre campus. A petition to be sent to Gov. Ridge accuses the state of being "more concerned about the bottom line than providing quality patient care for Pennsylvania's most vulnerable citizens. " The state Department of Public Welfare, citing a declining patient population and rising costs, announced last month that the psychiatric hospital, which employs about 450 people, will close at the end of June.
NEWS
August 11, 2000 | By Lauren Mayk, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The union that represents more than 300 nurses at Rancocas Hospital is asking for state and national reviews of the facility. The hospital is "a hellhole for employees and now, we fear, a dangerous place for patients," union representatives said yesterday. They are seeking an injunction from the National Labor Relations Board to stop the latest round of layoffs at the hospital. Losing more employees, the union says, will exacerbate problems with staffing levels and jeopardize patient care.
NEWS
December 4, 1997 | By Andrea Gerlin and Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In a national battle of health titans, the American Medical Association is declaring war on the country's biggest managed-care insurer. The AMA on Tuesday released a blistering 11-page letter it sent Aetna U.S. Healthcare, accusing the Blue Bell company of interfering with doctors' decisions and compromising patient care. The trade group contended that the insurer was using its size to bully doctors into accepting one-sided contracts that prevent them from criticizing the health plan and from discussing treatment options not covered by the company.
NEWS
February 28, 2002 | By Will Van Sant INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
State health officials halted all admissions and surgical procedures at the Memorial Hospital of Salem County yesterday after inspections found problems with patient care and infection control. Patients can still be treated in Salem Memorial's emergency room under the state order, but they will have to be taken to other hospitals in the area for further treatment. Those already admitted at the hospital are not affected by the decision. The Department of Health and Senior Services notified the hospital's president and chief executive officer, Denise R. Williams, in a letter dated Feb. 27 that regularly scheduled inspections over the last two weeks had found "significant violations" across a wide range of services.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2010 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Do Strikes Kill? That is the provocative title of a study released last month that examined the quality of care in New York hospitals during 50 nursing strikes over two decades. The answer appeared to be yes. The authors, an MIT professor working with a Carnegie Mellon University student, found that in-hospital deaths rose by 19.4 percent and readmissions by 6.5 percent for patients treated during strikes. "This study provides some of the first analytical evidence on the effects of health-care strikes on patients, and suggests that hospitals functioning during nurses' strikes are doing so at a lower quality of patient care," the authors wrote in a working paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research.
NEWS
July 13, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
The amount of advertising by cancer centers has exploded over the past decade - and so have come-ons that emotionally manipulate or even mislead patients. That is the bottom line of a study and accompanying editorial published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine. "Cancer center advertisements generally make appeals based on emotion - not fact," wrote Steven Woloshin, a physician and a medical communication researcher with the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice in New Hampshire.
NEWS
July 31, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, as hospitals cut costs to survive ever-increasing financial pressures, nurses argued that inadequate staffing harms patients. California's controversial and, so far, unique response was to mandate minimum nurse-to-patient ratios, which, if applied locally, would prevent 222 surgical deaths annually in New Jersey and 264 in Pennsylvania, researchers here calculated in 2010. Now members of that same University of Pennsylvania team say they have figured out a key reason for that.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 13, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
The amount of advertising by cancer centers has exploded over the past decade - and so have come-ons that emotionally manipulate or even mislead patients. That is the bottom line of a study and accompanying editorial published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine. "Cancer center advertisements generally make appeals based on emotion - not fact," wrote Steven Woloshin, a physician and a medical communication researcher with the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice in New Hampshire.
NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
New parents: Did the hospital temporarily label your newborn with the first name of "Babyboy" or "Babygirl"? If so, double-check the label when nurses give you a bottle of breast milk. There is a small chance that the milk came from another mother. A new study by the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority found 1,234 misidentification "events" involving babies born at hospitals and birthing centers in the state in 2014 and 2015, averaging about two a day. In almost all cases, there was no harm to the baby, generally because providers caught the mistake before it led to any incorrect treatment.
NEWS
May 9, 2016
On April 14, the 2016 Philadelphia Antique & Art Show hosted its 54th annual show and preview party under an enormous tent on the Marine Parade grounds of the Navy Yard. The preview party brought in more than 1,000 committee members, patrons, sponsors, exhibitors, and friends for a sneak peek at the timeless treasures, marking the beginning of the three-day show. This year's beneficiary, the Penn Acute Research Collaboration at Penn Medicine, will use the $500,000 raised to bring together physicians and researchers to develop innovations that improve patient care.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
Tandigm Health, a West Conshohocken start-up designed to help primary-care doctors manage costs and improve care in Southeastern Pennsylvania, said Friday that it cut health-care expenditures by $15 million last year. Most of the savings - which totaled $3 million more than hoped for - came in the Medicare Advantage side of the business, which covers about 25,000 patients, Tandigm president and chief executive Anthony Coletta said. "We dropped our Medicare Advantage spend by 3 percent, which is a big thing in the Philadelphia market," said Coletta, who is also an executive at Independence Blue Cross, one of Tandigm's owners.
NEWS
April 11, 2016 | By Michelle Andrews, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
For Erin Moore, keeping her son's cystic fibrosis in check requires careful monitoring to prevent the thick, sticky mucous his body produces from further damaging his lungs and digestive system. Moore keeps tabs on 6-year-old Drew's weight, appetite, exercise, and stools every day to see whether they stray from his healthy baseline. When he develops a cough, she tracks that, too. It's been nearly a year since Drew has been hospitalized; as a baby he was admitted up to four times a year.
NEWS
March 28, 2016
On March 19, Lankenau Hospital Medical Center's John B. Deaver Auxiliary of the Women's Board hosted its Heart to Heart Gala at the Merion Golf Club in Ardmore. The John B. Deaver Auxiliary is a volunteer-led group that supports Lankenau Hospital's medical education and research programs and services that help enhance patient care. More than 175 auxiliary members, doctors, and supporters attended the gala and enjoyed dinner as well as silent and live auctions. The $50,000 raised will benefit the Women's Heart Initiative at Lankenau Medical Center, a cause that seeks to educate, inform, and empower women in the community to learn, act, and live.
NEWS
March 13, 2016
On March 5, the Fox Chase Cancer Center board of associates, Main Line chapter, hosted its Night for the Fight at the Baldwin School in Bryn Mawr. The group of more than 600 volunteers supports patient care and cancer research at the Fox Chase Cancer Center. More than 180 attended the Main Line chapter's event, which included dinner, dancing to the band Slippery, and a silent auction. Along with the fun, more than $50,000 was raised to support research and patient care.  
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Staff Writer
SOMERS POINT, N.J. - As many as 213 patients at Shore Medical Center may have been exposed to HIV or hepatitis because of drug tampering by an employee, the hospital said Thursday. The employee, who worked in the hospital's pharmacy, has not been identified publicly but has been terminated, according to a statement. "We have been working with public health authorities to determine if patients could have been exposed to blood-borne pathogens at Shore through contact with this employee's blood," said a statement issued by the hospital Thursday.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Einstein Healthcare Network said Wednesday that it reached its $150 million fund-raising target five months early and will seek to add another $5 million or $10 million to the total by June. The tax-exempt network, which has hospitals in Philadelphia, East Norriton and Elkins Park, started the fund-raising effort six years ago with the goal of $100 million, but raised its target to $150 million in September 2013. The purpose of the campaign is to pay not only for buildings and equipment, but also for "innovations in patient care, expanded teaching and research opportunities, and enhanced community outreach and programming," Einstein said.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania Health System has agreed to help VPS Healthcare, a health system based in the United Arab Emirates, improve the care of patients with lifestyle-related disease, such as diabetes, and cancer, VPS said Monday.. No terms were disclosed. As part of the partnership, Penn will help VPS develop educational conferences, standards for patient care, as well as continuing medical education for physicians, nurses and other allied health professionals. VPS operates 14 hospitals in the Middle East, Europe, and India.
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