CollectionsPatient Care
IN THE NEWS

Patient Care

NEWS
February 14, 1996 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
State health officials say they're surprised and troubled to discover that the U.S. attorney's office is investigating conditions at the Philadelphia Nursing Home. The city-owned home only recently regained its full state license in December after receiving serious sanctions following a state inspection in June. "We're concerned," said State Health Department spokesman Bruce Reimer. He said state health officials were unaware of the probe until it was disclosed yesterday. Meanwhile, Mayor Rendell downplayed the probe.
NEWS
April 1, 1996 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Charlotte Blankley walks softly and carries a little cellular phone. A registered nurse from Downingtown, Blankley works on Paoli Memorial Hospital's third-floor telemetry unit, where special equipment monitors heart patients. The push to lower health-care costs has reshaped her job, right down to the station where she works. Instead of a large central nurses' station, Blankley works from a mini-base called a patient server just outside patient rooms. There is one server - with supply cabinets, drawers, desktop, phone, charts and computer terminal - for every five patients.
NEWS
September 11, 1991 | by Robin Palley, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Anthony S. Twyman contributed to this report
The Philadelphia Nursing Home - the sole public facility serving AIDS patients and the indigent elderly here - has failed its state licensing inspection. The home received only a provisional license and has been ordered to make corrections. State inspectors cited problems in the home's infection-control procedures, use of restraints without proper consent, monitoring of patients' diets, patient care, cleanliness, and recordkeeping, according to a copy of the inspection report obtained by the Daily News.
NEWS
July 1, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN JASPER Palmer Jr. coached a girls softball team, he kept them motivated by telling them they hit like girls. Maybe it wasn't the smartest idea to humiliate his team members that way - sort of like Tom Hanks telling his women's team in "A League of Their Own" that there's no crying in baseball. However, Jasper's approach worked, for the most part. There was a marked reduction in "girlie" hitting on his team, which was part of a women's softball league. And when he coached a Little League team, the Mount Airy Bantams, he could bring a player up short with his familiar saying, "You eyeballing me, son?"
BUSINESS
July 30, 1996 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Independence Blue Cross plans to drop Graduate Hospital from its network in 1997 and no longer pay for patient care there. The decision, disclosed in a letter the insurer faxed its brokers on Friday, also affects Graduate Hospital System (GHS)-City Avenue Hospital, GHS-Parkview, and Mount Sinai. It's scheduled to take effect Feb. 1, 1997, for members of Personal Choice, Keystone Health Plan East, Keystone Health Systems and Blue Choice, and on July 1, 1997, for traditional and comprehensive major-medical subscribers, according to the letter signed by Blue Cross chief marketing executive Christopher D. Butler.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2012 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
  When Walter Bronek had a mini-stroke in September, he was taken to the closest hospital, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Hamilton. "I never saw a neurologist at Robert Wood. The only thing I saw was a computer screen with a doctor from Jeff," said Bronek, referring to Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia. After an examination, the "doc-in-the-box," as Bronek called him, recommended Bronek go to Jefferson, which counts Mercer County's Robert Wood Johnson Hamilton among the 28 hospitals in its Jefferson Neuroscience Network.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2012 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
From its roots in California, hospital owner Prime Healthcare Services Inc. is expanding across the country by acquiring financially troubled hospitals, including Roxborough Memorial and Lower Bucks in the Philadelphia region. At hospitals on the verge of closing, the for-profit company is generally welcome - even as disputes with a large union and a major competitor in Southern California dog the firm's reputation. In Roxborough, where the community hospital has changed hands three times since 2003, Prime and its regional chief executive, Peter J. Adamo, have made a positive impression, Bernard Guet, executive director of the Roxborough Development Corp., said Thursday.
NEWS
March 3, 2008 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Registered nurse Patrice Arrell was ready with her standardized pre-op checklist when the patient arrived at Chester County Hospital on Tuesday morning for an operation to replace his aching right knee. She made sure that the staff reviewed the 62-year-old's medical history and pre-admission records, and conducted a slew of routine tests. And Arrell herself put a "compression stocking" on the patient's left leg long before he was wheeled off to the operating room. The tight-fitting hosiery prevents blood from accumulating in an inactive leg. Confirming that it is used, every time, is one of many steps the hospital has devised to lower the risk of potentially deadly blood clots after surgery.
NEWS
February 11, 1999 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With ledgers bleeding red ink, officials at Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center are stepping up efforts to cut costs, but insist their economizing will not shortchange patient care. The sprawling health-care system suffered operating losses of more than $8 million in 1998. The exact amount will not be made public until a year-end audit is completed, in about four weeks, said Michael Dolfman, executive vice president for Cooper. "The financial difficulties have in no way affected or influenced patient care," Dolfman said yesterday.
NEWS
March 20, 1999 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two neighborhood doctors' clinics - and possibly more - will close as part of Cooper Health System's cost-cutting, officials of the financially troubled medical network confirmed yesterday. Patients at the two clinics, both in Collingswood, are being directed to other Cooper-affiliated clinics not far away, Cooper spokeswoman Kathy McLaughlin said. Leslie Hirsch, Cooper's acting president and chief executive officer, said that belt-tightening would require the consolidation of some satellite offices scattered throughout South Jersey.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|