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NEWS
February 28, 2012
By Arthur Caplan Think your doctor is telling you the truth? According to a survey recently published in the journal Health Affairs, he may well not be. The study found that one in 10 doctors has lied to at least one patient in the past year. Twenty percent of the 2,000 doctors surveyed admitted they had not told patients the truth about an error. Ten percent said they had failed to disclose financial conflicts of interest. And 15 percent said they had painted a rosier picture of a patient's prognosis than they knew to be true.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1994 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hahnemann University Hospital yesterday announced a plan to overhaul the way patients are cared for, but a local union immediately expressed concern about possible job losses. Henry Nicholas, president of District 1199C of the National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees, estimated that the sweeping proposal could eliminate 25 percent to 40 percent of Hahnemann's 3,200-person workforce. Nicholas' union represents about 1,300 housekeepers, technicians and aides at the 600-bed teaching hospital at Broad and Vine Streets.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2009 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Compared with the swath of health-care businesses spread out on either side of Interstate 95 from New York to Washington, tiny Danville and Riverside, Pa., at first glance don't seem to have much to offer that industry. But the two hamlets, across the Susquehanna River from each other about 150 miles northwest of Philadelphia, are homes to organizations trying to spark a boom in health-care innovation in rural Pennsylvania. One is Danville's Geisinger Health System, which has attracted national attention for providing quality patient care at relatively low costs.
NEWS
March 1, 2002 | By Will Van Sant INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
State officials last night lifted a two-day-old ban on new admissions and some other services at Memorial Hospital of Salem County after a reinspection found that problems with patient care seen earlier were being addressed. "After this morning's meeting with hospital leadership . . . we are satisfied with the hospital's comprehensive efforts to correct problems," Clifton R. Lacy, acting commissioner of the Department of Health and Senior Services, said last night. On Wednesday, the state ordered that all admissions be halted and all surgical procedures be suspended after regularly scheduled inspections found poor sterilization of equipment, irregular keeping of prescription records, and a lack of nursing-care plans for many patients.
NEWS
February 14, 1996 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
State health officials say they're surprised and troubled to discover that the U.S. attorney's office is investigating conditions at the Philadelphia Nursing Home. The city-owned home only recently regained its full state license in December after receiving serious sanctions following a state inspection in June. "We're concerned," said State Health Department spokesman Bruce Reimer. He said state health officials were unaware of the probe until it was disclosed yesterday. Meanwhile, Mayor Rendell downplayed the probe.
NEWS
April 1, 1996 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Charlotte Blankley walks softly and carries a little cellular phone. A registered nurse from Downingtown, Blankley works on Paoli Memorial Hospital's third-floor telemetry unit, where special equipment monitors heart patients. The push to lower health-care costs has reshaped her job, right down to the station where she works. Instead of a large central nurses' station, Blankley works from a mini-base called a patient server just outside patient rooms. There is one server - with supply cabinets, drawers, desktop, phone, charts and computer terminal - for every five patients.
NEWS
September 11, 1991 | by Robin Palley, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Anthony S. Twyman contributed to this report
The Philadelphia Nursing Home - the sole public facility serving AIDS patients and the indigent elderly here - has failed its state licensing inspection. The home received only a provisional license and has been ordered to make corrections. State inspectors cited problems in the home's infection-control procedures, use of restraints without proper consent, monitoring of patients' diets, patient care, cleanliness, and recordkeeping, according to a copy of the inspection report obtained by the Daily News.
NEWS
July 1, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN JASPER Palmer Jr. coached a girls softball team, he kept them motivated by telling them they hit like girls. Maybe it wasn't the smartest idea to humiliate his team members that way - sort of like Tom Hanks telling his women's team in "A League of Their Own" that there's no crying in baseball. However, Jasper's approach worked, for the most part. There was a marked reduction in "girlie" hitting on his team, which was part of a women's softball league. And when he coached a Little League team, the Mount Airy Bantams, he could bring a player up short with his familiar saying, "You eyeballing me, son?"
BUSINESS
July 30, 1996 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Independence Blue Cross plans to drop Graduate Hospital from its network in 1997 and no longer pay for patient care there. The decision, disclosed in a letter the insurer faxed its brokers on Friday, also affects Graduate Hospital System (GHS)-City Avenue Hospital, GHS-Parkview, and Mount Sinai. It's scheduled to take effect Feb. 1, 1997, for members of Personal Choice, Keystone Health Plan East, Keystone Health Systems and Blue Choice, and on July 1, 1997, for traditional and comprehensive major-medical subscribers, according to the letter signed by Blue Cross chief marketing executive Christopher D. Butler.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey will start selling two new health insurance plans for small businesses in July, with lower premiums and lower out-of-pocket costs if patients go to certain doctors, the Newark company said Thursday. When participants in the plans go to doctors who participate in a program that pays them more when they improve patient satisfaction and patient care, the patients will save money. Under the traditional model of care, doctors get paid more by providing more services.
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