CollectionsPatient Care
IN THE NEWS

Patient Care

BUSINESS
June 27, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University Health System announced the elimination of 11 positions at Fox Chase Cancer Center and 14 at Jeanes Hospital. Officials said efforts were underway to find new jobs in the system for the affected employees, who came from management and nonmanagement ranks but were not involved in patient care. Fox Chase and Jeanes have a combined 3,500 employees. Those cutbacks, part of the integration of Fox Chase and Jeanes, followed a larger layoff last week at Einstein Health.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Einstein Healthcare Network said Wednesday that it reached its $150 million fund-raising target five months early and will seek to add another $5 million or $10 million to the total by June. The tax-exempt network, which has hospitals in Philadelphia, East Norriton and Elkins Park, started the fund-raising effort six years ago with the goal of $100 million, but raised its target to $150 million in September 2013. The purpose of the campaign is to pay not only for buildings and equipment, but also for "innovations in patient care, expanded teaching and research opportunities, and enhanced community outreach and programming," Einstein said.
NEWS
March 28, 2016
On March 19, Lankenau Hospital Medical Center's John B. Deaver Auxiliary of the Women's Board hosted its Heart to Heart Gala at the Merion Golf Club in Ardmore. The John B. Deaver Auxiliary is a volunteer-led group that supports Lankenau Hospital's medical education and research programs and services that help enhance patient care. More than 175 auxiliary members, doctors, and supporters attended the gala and enjoyed dinner as well as silent and live auctions. The $50,000 raised will benefit the Women's Heart Initiative at Lankenau Medical Center, a cause that seeks to educate, inform, and empower women in the community to learn, act, and live.
NEWS
September 28, 1988 | By Robin Palley, Daily News Staff Writer
The state Department of Health has ordered the bankrupt University Nursing & Rehabilitation Center in South Philadelphia to relocate its 160 remaining patients to other nursing homes as quickly as possible. Families and patients were advised last week that the cutoff date for finding new placements for patients was "approximately Sept. 30. " However, Brenda Bacon, president of HealthTeam Inc., the company brought in by the federal bankruptcy court as interim managers for the center, said there is no firm deadline for moving all patients out. She said her firm and state authorities have agreed to move several patients a day to other nursing homes as appropriate placements for them become available.
NEWS
August 12, 2008
I APPRECIATED Kenneth Braithwaite's Aug. 6 letter on my op-ed "8 Tips for Surviving a Hospital Stay. " Hospitals are making efforts to improve safety to save more lives, and patients are grateful. But that process will be slow- going given the magnitude of the preventable, fatal errors. Hospital care is hazardous to a patient's health. HealthGrades' most recent report (Fifth Annual HealthGrades Patient Safety in American Hospitals Study, 2008) says that nearly a quarter of a million deaths in hospitals were found to be preventable.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1994 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hahnemann University Hospital yesterday announced a plan to overhaul the way patients are cared for, but a local union immediately expressed concern about possible job losses. Henry Nicholas, president of District 1199C of the National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees, estimated that the sweeping proposal could eliminate 25 percent to 40 percent of Hahnemann's 3,200-person workforce. Nicholas' union represents about 1,300 housekeepers, technicians and aides at the 600-bed teaching hospital at Broad and Vine Streets.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2009 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Compared with the swath of health-care businesses spread out on either side of Interstate 95 from New York to Washington, tiny Danville and Riverside, Pa., at first glance don't seem to have much to offer that industry. But the two hamlets, across the Susquehanna River from each other about 150 miles northwest of Philadelphia, are homes to organizations trying to spark a boom in health-care innovation in rural Pennsylvania. One is Danville's Geisinger Health System, which has attracted national attention for providing quality patient care at relatively low costs.
NEWS
March 1, 2002 | By Will Van Sant INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
State officials last night lifted a two-day-old ban on new admissions and some other services at Memorial Hospital of Salem County after a reinspection found that problems with patient care seen earlier were being addressed. "After this morning's meeting with hospital leadership . . . we are satisfied with the hospital's comprehensive efforts to correct problems," Clifton R. Lacy, acting commissioner of the Department of Health and Senior Services, said last night. On Wednesday, the state ordered that all admissions be halted and all surgical procedures be suspended after regularly scheduled inspections found poor sterilization of equipment, irregular keeping of prescription records, and a lack of nursing-care plans for many patients.
NEWS
February 14, 1996 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
State health officials say they're surprised and troubled to discover that the U.S. attorney's office is investigating conditions at the Philadelphia Nursing Home. The city-owned home only recently regained its full state license in December after receiving serious sanctions following a state inspection in June. "We're concerned," said State Health Department spokesman Bruce Reimer. He said state health officials were unaware of the probe until it was disclosed yesterday. Meanwhile, Mayor Rendell downplayed the probe.
NEWS
April 1, 1996 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Charlotte Blankley walks softly and carries a little cellular phone. A registered nurse from Downingtown, Blankley works on Paoli Memorial Hospital's third-floor telemetry unit, where special equipment monitors heart patients. The push to lower health-care costs has reshaped her job, right down to the station where she works. Instead of a large central nurses' station, Blankley works from a mini-base called a patient server just outside patient rooms. There is one server - with supply cabinets, drawers, desktop, phone, charts and computer terminal - for every five patients.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|