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NEWS
January 22, 2012
Remembering Herb Clarke Herb Clarke died Jan. 8. He was best known and remembered as the longtime weatherman on WCAU, NBC10, and then for his six years of garden reports on KYW radio. He was also my dad. We moved to Philadelphia when Dad came to work at Channel 10 in November 1958. I was a baby. All three of us Clarke children grew up in Philadelphia. TV is a fickle and sometimes cruel business. On-air talent is often cut or reassigned with little notice. There one day, gone the next.
NEWS
October 21, 2011 | Associated Press
The federal government laid out final rules Thursday for a new program that aims to improve patient care by getting doctors, hospitals, and other care providers to work together more. Health-care providers will be able to start forming accountable care organizations in 2012 to coordinate care, share records, and cut down on duplicative tests and medical errors. Providers will have to make a three-year commitment to care for a group of at least 5,000 Medicare patients if they form these organizations known as ACOs.
NEWS
September 20, 2011 | By Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The doctor doesn't think your sore throat is bad enough yet to order a strep test - unaware that a dozen people across town were diagnosed with strep throat just last week. Doctors rarely know what bugs are brewing in the neighborhood until their own waiting rooms start to fill. Harvard University researchers reported Monday that getting them real-time information on nearby infections could improve patient care - for strep throat alone, potentially helping tens of thousands avoid a delayed diagnosis or getting unneeded antibiotics.
NEWS
May 1, 2011 | By Noam N. Levey, Tribune Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration finalized plans Friday to reward hospitals that provide high-quality care, the first in a series of steps designed to fundamentally transform the way the federal government pays for health care. Under the initiative - one of several authorized in the new health-care law the president signed last year - Medicare will pay more to institutions scoring well on a series of measures that gauge patient care and less to those that don't hit the quality benchmarks.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2010 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Do Strikes Kill? That is the provocative title of a study released last month that examined the quality of care in New York hospitals during 50 nursing strikes over two decades. The answer appeared to be yes. The authors, an MIT professor working with a Carnegie Mellon University student, found that in-hospital deaths rose by 19.4 percent and readmissions by 6.5 percent for patients treated during strikes. "This study provides some of the first analytical evidence on the effects of health-care strikes on patients, and suggests that hospitals functioning during nurses' strikes are doing so at a lower quality of patient care," the authors wrote in a working paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research.
NEWS
December 14, 2009 | By Chelsea Conaboy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
States have begun restricting the perks that drug and medical-device manufacturers can give doctors, aiming to keep the companies from influencing prescription habits and treatment plans. New Jersey could become the first to make doctors accountable. State Attorney General Anne Milgram has recommended banning doctors licensed in the state from accepting gifts that don't directly benefit their patients, and requiring them to report consulting fees greater than $200. The choice to put the responsibility on doctors, met with scorn from the Medical Society of New Jersey, was deliberate.
NEWS
November 19, 2009 | By ROBERT STRAUSS For the Inquirer
Arthur Chernoff has a dream, one that he feels will ease a lot of angst for diabetics and other chronically ill patients, and when he talks about it, he sounds almost as animated as the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. did describing his own dream. "Doctors and insurers should be doing more to lower the barriers to effective health care, instead of raising the barriers," said Chernoff, chairman of the Division of Endocrinology at Albert Einstein Medical Center. What Chernoff proposes is a sort of "diabetes passport," a way for patients to reach more easily the many doctors they need to see. Because the disease ravages so many body systems, diabetics may need, besides primary-care doctors, a phalanx of specialists such as endocrinologists, cardiologists, podiatrists, ophthalmologists or nephrologists, not to mention dietitians or other health professionals.
NEWS
September 22, 2009 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a model that could be copied by other cities, the three major health systems serving Camden are joining with local doctors to share health records of patients who give their permission, enabling doctors to give more timely and informed care. Cooper University Hospital, Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center, and Virtua Health - normally fierce competitors - plan to join with most primary-care providers in the city of 70,000 to create an exchange giving doctors access to such records as hospital discharge summaries, lab results, medications, and X-rays.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2009 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Compared with the swath of health-care businesses spread out on either side of Interstate 95 from New York to Washington, tiny Danville and Riverside, Pa., at first glance don't seem to have much to offer that industry. But the two hamlets, across the Susquehanna River from each other about 150 miles northwest of Philadelphia, are homes to organizations trying to spark a boom in health-care innovation in rural Pennsylvania. One is Danville's Geisinger Health System, which has attracted national attention for providing quality patient care at relatively low costs.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2009 | By Becky Batcha DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER
With markets still down and government funding heading in the same direction, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia set out in October to trim $60 million from its $1.6 billion budget. With that target met, Children's will open its fiscal 2010 next week with a balanced budget - a product of extensive staff input and a badge of fiscal discipline that could help the children's health heavyweight attract top medical recruits. Madeline Bell, a mother of seven who started her career as a nurse on the hospital's night shift, is chief operating officer for Children's health system, which has 9,572 employees at its University City campus and affiliates across the region.
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