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NEWS
July 25, 2012 | By Michael B. Laign
Amid all the negative noise about the proposed partnership between Holy Redeemer Health System and Abington Health, the primary reason for the plan has been largely forgotten. While some celebrated the end of the health systems' discussions because a partnership would have eliminated abortions at Abington, the truth is that change is coming to all health systems. Instead of waiting for that change to dictate our response, we at Holy Redeemer believe in embracing it by working to create a better regional health-care system.
NEWS
February 28, 2012
By Arthur Caplan Think your doctor is telling you the truth? According to a survey recently published in the journal Health Affairs, he may well not be. The study found that one in 10 doctors has lied to at least one patient in the past year. Twenty percent of the 2,000 doctors surveyed admitted they had not told patients the truth about an error. Ten percent said they had failed to disclose financial conflicts of interest. And 15 percent said they had painted a rosier picture of a patient's prognosis than they knew to be true.
NEWS
February 10, 2012
Most important thing about Iran A military attack on Iran's nuclear program is fraught with hazards, as Trudy Rubin correctly notes ("Israeli strike on Iran: Why we should worry," Sunday). But assertions by American officials that "the most important thing is to keep the international community unified" are mistaken. The "most important thing" is keeping nuclear weapons out of the hands of Iran before nuclear devices explode in American cities, or a high-altitude nuclear explosion severely damages our electronic infrastructure.
NEWS
October 21, 2011 | Associated Press
The federal government laid out final rules Thursday for a new program that aims to improve patient care by getting doctors, hospitals, and other care providers to work together more. Health-care providers will be able to start forming accountable care organizations in 2012 to coordinate care, share records, and cut down on duplicative tests and medical errors. Providers will have to make a three-year commitment to care for a group of at least 5,000 Medicare patients if they form these organizations known as ACOs.
NEWS
September 20, 2011 | By Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The doctor doesn't think your sore throat is bad enough yet to order a strep test - unaware that a dozen people across town were diagnosed with strep throat just last week. Doctors rarely know what bugs are brewing in the neighborhood until their own waiting rooms start to fill. Harvard University researchers reported Monday that getting them real-time information on nearby infections could improve patient care - for strep throat alone, potentially helping tens of thousands avoid a delayed diagnosis or getting unneeded antibiotics.
NEWS
May 1, 2011 | By Noam N. Levey, Tribune Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration finalized plans Friday to reward hospitals that provide high-quality care, the first in a series of steps designed to fundamentally transform the way the federal government pays for health care. Under the initiative - one of several authorized in the new health-care law the president signed last year - Medicare will pay more to institutions scoring well on a series of measures that gauge patient care and less to those that don't hit the quality benchmarks.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2010 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Do Strikes Kill? That is the provocative title of a study released last month that examined the quality of care in New York hospitals during 50 nursing strikes over two decades. The answer appeared to be yes. The authors, an MIT professor working with a Carnegie Mellon University student, found that in-hospital deaths rose by 19.4 percent and readmissions by 6.5 percent for patients treated during strikes. "This study provides some of the first analytical evidence on the effects of health-care strikes on patients, and suggests that hospitals functioning during nurses' strikes are doing so at a lower quality of patient care," the authors wrote in a working paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research.
NEWS
December 14, 2009 | By Chelsea Conaboy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
States have begun restricting the perks that drug and medical-device manufacturers can give doctors, aiming to keep the companies from influencing prescription habits and treatment plans. New Jersey could become the first to make doctors accountable. State Attorney General Anne Milgram has recommended banning doctors licensed in the state from accepting gifts that don't directly benefit their patients, and requiring them to report consulting fees greater than $200. The choice to put the responsibility on doctors, met with scorn from the Medical Society of New Jersey, was deliberate.
NEWS
November 19, 2009 | By ROBERT STRAUSS For the Inquirer
Arthur Chernoff has a dream, one that he feels will ease a lot of angst for diabetics and other chronically ill patients, and when he talks about it, he sounds almost as animated as the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. did describing his own dream. "Doctors and insurers should be doing more to lower the barriers to effective health care, instead of raising the barriers," said Chernoff, chairman of the Division of Endocrinology at Albert Einstein Medical Center. What Chernoff proposes is a sort of "diabetes passport," a way for patients to reach more easily the many doctors they need to see. Because the disease ravages so many body systems, diabetics may need, besides primary-care doctors, a phalanx of specialists such as endocrinologists, cardiologists, podiatrists, ophthalmologists or nephrologists, not to mention dietitians or other health professionals.
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