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BUSINESS
February 6, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Surgeon Beth DuPree's bricks-and-mortar dream - a specialized hospital for breast-cancer patients - closed Wednesday, a victim, she says, of the economy and naive business planning. But her hope remains intact. For her, the closing of the Comprehensive Breast Care Institute at DSI of Bucks County, a freestanding, for-profit hospital in Bensalem, is both cautionary tale and learning experience. "Although the business model failed, the patient-care model succeeded," she said this week from her home, where she is recovering from surgery to correct a painful colon problem.
NEWS
September 7, 2008 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rita A. Mariotti, whose dream of becoming a wealthy South Philadelphia doctor changed after she cared for poor coal miners in eastern Kentucky early in her career, died of lymphoma Aug. 26. Dr. Mariotti, 78, of Glendora, who eventually practiced family medicine for more than 35 years in the small town of Woodbury Heights, died at a friend's home in Sewell. The bright South Philadelphia High School for Girls student (Class of 1948) fantasized about being rich when she saw physicians' grand homes on South Broad Street.
NEWS
August 12, 2008
I APPRECIATED Kenneth Braithwaite's Aug. 6 letter on my op-ed "8 Tips for Surviving a Hospital Stay. " Hospitals are making efforts to improve safety to save more lives, and patients are grateful. But that process will be slow- going given the magnitude of the preventable, fatal errors. Hospital care is hazardous to a patient's health. HealthGrades' most recent report (Fifth Annual HealthGrades Patient Safety in American Hospitals Study, 2008) says that nearly a quarter of a million deaths in hospitals were found to be preventable.
NEWS
May 22, 2008 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gov. Corzine met with employees at the troubled Ancora Psychiatric Hospital yesterday before announcing a package of reforms being implemented there. Primarily, the changes are geared toward reducing overcrowding and restructuring patient care at the state-run hospital, which has suffered through a number of high-profile patient escapes and deaths in recent years. "It's been a tough period for people who care deeply about the patients being served," Corzine said. "I take this issue of how we deal with our mental health delivery system seriously.
NEWS
March 3, 2008 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Registered nurse Patrice Arrell was ready with her standardized pre-op checklist when the patient arrived at Chester County Hospital on Tuesday morning for an operation to replace his aching right knee. She made sure that the staff reviewed the 62-year-old's medical history and pre-admission records, and conducted a slew of routine tests. And Arrell herself put a "compression stocking" on the patient's left leg long before he was wheeled off to the operating room. The tight-fitting hosiery prevents blood from accumulating in an inactive leg. Confirming that it is used, every time, is one of many steps the hospital has devised to lower the risk of potentially deadly blood clots after surgery.
NEWS
February 17, 2007 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple University Health System said yesterday that it would cut 500 jobs in a major reorganization attempting to restore financial health to the four-hospital network, which serves as the safety net for some of the city's poorest neighborhoods. In a city with no public hospital, Temple has, to a degree, been forced into that role, and is now caught between the rising cost of care and the decreasing Medicaid payments to treat those patients that account for nearly half its admissions.
NEWS
December 10, 2005 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Haddon Township doctor accused of submitting inflated bills to insurance companies was ordered yesterday to suspend his practice for six months and take courses in medical record-keeping and professional ethics, authorities said. Dennis M. Scardigli, whose main practice is based in Westmont, must also reimburse the state $135,000 for the cost of the investigation, according to a spokesman for the state Division of Consumer Affairs. Scardigli also had been charged with providing inadequate clinical examinations, preparing inadequate records of his motor-vehicle-accident patients, and making unnecessary referrals of his patients to other businesses that he owned: the Psychophysiological Assessment and Treatment Center, and South Jersey Diagnostics.
NEWS
May 10, 2005 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Patients can now create their own online medical records, receive electronic health alerts tailored to their ailments, and exchange e-mail with their doctors free of charge, under a service unveiled yesterday. The for-profit venture, called iHealthRecord, is part of an ongoing trend toward converting patient records, many of which still are maintained on paper, to the Internet. Health-care economists say conversion of patient records to databases linked to the Internet would save billions of dollars and greatly improve patient care by, among other things, helping to avoid medical errors.
NEWS
December 19, 2004 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's just after 7 p.m. and Dr. Daniel Sterman is starting his rounds through the surgical intensive-care unit at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Dressed in green scrubs and holiday red socks, Sterman checks first on William Kinney, 50, who was hit by a car while riding his bike. His long list of injuries includes a perforated lung and fractured pelvic bones. Sterman takes a look at Kinney and the monitors tracking his breathing, heart rate, blood pressure, heart rhythm, and blood oxygen saturation.
NEWS
June 24, 2004 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The company that dominates management of mental-health care in the region has told therapists it will cut their pay in September, a move that psychologists say could reduce patient access to treatment and put some large psychological groups out of business. At meetings this month, representatives of Magellan Health Services told representatives of about 30 psychological group practices that it was restructuring the way it provided services to subscribers of Independence Blue Cross' Keystone Health Plan East, group managers said.
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