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NEWS
November 19, 2009 | By ROBERT STRAUSS For the Inquirer
Arthur Chernoff has a dream, one that he feels will ease a lot of angst for diabetics and other chronically ill patients, and when he talks about it, he sounds almost as animated as the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. did describing his own dream. "Doctors and insurers should be doing more to lower the barriers to effective health care, instead of raising the barriers," said Chernoff, chairman of the Division of Endocrinology at Albert Einstein Medical Center. What Chernoff proposes is a sort of "diabetes passport," a way for patients to reach more easily the many doctors they need to see. Because the disease ravages so many body systems, diabetics may need, besides primary-care doctors, a phalanx of specialists such as endocrinologists, cardiologists, podiatrists, ophthalmologists or nephrologists, not to mention dietitians or other health professionals.
NEWS
September 22, 2009 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a model that could be copied by other cities, the three major health systems serving Camden are joining with local doctors to share health records of patients who give their permission, enabling doctors to give more timely and informed care. Cooper University Hospital, Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center, and Virtua Health - normally fierce competitors - plan to join with most primary-care providers in the city of 70,000 to create an exchange giving doctors access to such records as hospital discharge summaries, lab results, medications, and X-rays.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2009 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Compared with the swath of health-care businesses spread out on either side of Interstate 95 from New York to Washington, tiny Danville and Riverside, Pa., at first glance don't seem to have much to offer that industry. But the two hamlets, across the Susquehanna River from each other about 150 miles northwest of Philadelphia, are homes to organizations trying to spark a boom in health-care innovation in rural Pennsylvania. One is Danville's Geisinger Health System, which has attracted national attention for providing quality patient care at relatively low costs.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2009 | By Becky Batcha DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER
With markets still down and government funding heading in the same direction, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia set out in October to trim $60 million from its $1.6 billion budget. With that target met, Children's will open its fiscal 2010 next week with a balanced budget - a product of extensive staff input and a badge of fiscal discipline that could help the children's health heavyweight attract top medical recruits. Madeline Bell, a mother of seven who started her career as a nurse on the hospital's night shift, is chief operating officer for Children's health system, which has 9,572 employees at its University City campus and affiliates across the region.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Surgeon Beth DuPree's bricks-and-mortar dream - a specialized hospital for breast-cancer patients - closed Wednesday, a victim, she says, of the economy and naive business planning. But her hope remains intact. For her, the closing of the Comprehensive Breast Care Institute at DSI of Bucks County, a freestanding, for-profit hospital in Bensalem, is both cautionary tale and learning experience. "Although the business model failed, the patient-care model succeeded," she said this week from her home, where she is recovering from surgery to correct a painful colon problem.
NEWS
September 7, 2008 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rita A. Mariotti, whose dream of becoming a wealthy South Philadelphia doctor changed after she cared for poor coal miners in eastern Kentucky early in her career, died of lymphoma Aug. 26. Dr. Mariotti, 78, of Glendora, who eventually practiced family medicine for more than 35 years in the small town of Woodbury Heights, died at a friend's home in Sewell. The bright South Philadelphia High School for Girls student (Class of 1948) fantasized about being rich when she saw physicians' grand homes on South Broad Street.
NEWS
August 12, 2008
I APPRECIATED Kenneth Braithwaite's Aug. 6 letter on my op-ed "8 Tips for Surviving a Hospital Stay. " Hospitals are making efforts to improve safety to save more lives, and patients are grateful. But that process will be slow- going given the magnitude of the preventable, fatal errors. Hospital care is hazardous to a patient's health. HealthGrades' most recent report (Fifth Annual HealthGrades Patient Safety in American Hospitals Study, 2008) says that nearly a quarter of a million deaths in hospitals were found to be preventable.
NEWS
May 22, 2008 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gov. Corzine met with employees at the troubled Ancora Psychiatric Hospital yesterday before announcing a package of reforms being implemented there. Primarily, the changes are geared toward reducing overcrowding and restructuring patient care at the state-run hospital, which has suffered through a number of high-profile patient escapes and deaths in recent years. "It's been a tough period for people who care deeply about the patients being served," Corzine said. "I take this issue of how we deal with our mental health delivery system seriously.
NEWS
March 3, 2008 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Registered nurse Patrice Arrell was ready with her standardized pre-op checklist when the patient arrived at Chester County Hospital on Tuesday morning for an operation to replace his aching right knee. She made sure that the staff reviewed the 62-year-old's medical history and pre-admission records, and conducted a slew of routine tests. And Arrell herself put a "compression stocking" on the patient's left leg long before he was wheeled off to the operating room. The tight-fitting hosiery prevents blood from accumulating in an inactive leg. Confirming that it is used, every time, is one of many steps the hospital has devised to lower the risk of potentially deadly blood clots after surgery.
NEWS
February 17, 2007 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple University Health System said yesterday that it would cut 500 jobs in a major reorganization attempting to restore financial health to the four-hospital network, which serves as the safety net for some of the city's poorest neighborhoods. In a city with no public hospital, Temple has, to a degree, been forced into that role, and is now caught between the rising cost of care and the decreasing Medicaid payments to treat those patients that account for nearly half its admissions.
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