CollectionsPatio
IN THE NEWS

Patio

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 31, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
The first cookout of the season is behind us, but perhaps while entertaining Memorial Day you realized just how tacky your outdoor furniture really looks. Especially if you left it out all winter. Maybe it's time to replace it. Here are some questions you should ask yourself to assure that the outdoor furnishings you select will meet your needs. They're from Casual Decor magazine. How many people do you need to accommodate? Will the top priority be family activities - dinners for four, lounging with a book, playing with the kids?
NEWS
July 15, 1993 | by Ronnie Ross, Special to the Daily News
Longing to have a little patch of paradise all your own? With some careful planning and a bit of imagination, even those with small apartment or condo patios can have lush little havens in which to enjoy nature's bounty. The first step in creating a small-space garden is to outline the hardscape, which generally includes the patio surface area, according to Willy Bear, of Sperling Nursery in Calabasas, Calif. Hardscape can constitute cobblestone, cement, bricks, wood decking, stepping stones or any other material used on patios, she said, adding that the perimeter of a hardscape area is usually lined with some type of border, such as a raised planter bed. "The guidelines are dictated by the size and shape of the area," said Bear, who received certification from the Ecole de Jardin in France and who traveled in England studying gardens.
NEWS
April 2, 1989 | By Christine Hausman, Special to The Inquirer
The North Wales zoning board has given a local man permission to build a patio on a concrete lot at 335-337 Elm St., even though it would violate a seven-foot sideyard ordinance. At a meeting on Thursday, the board said it would allow Jeffery Clemens to construct the patio because the lot - which is covered with concrete rather than grass - is already in violation of the zoning ordinance. The ordinance requires a grass buffer between lots. Daniel H. O'Connell, board chairman, said he believed the violation was not that serious and that it would not be worth the $16,000 Clemens would have to spend to remove the concrete from the lot, where there also is a twin house.
NEWS
August 24, 1988 | By Dan Meyers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Portraying himself as "an average businessman" who made mistakes, City Councilman James J. Tayoun yesterday asked a city licensing board to approve the brown and white tile patio he built without permits for the Middle East restaurant in Old City. But an attorney for the city asked the Board of License and Inspection Review to uphold an earlier decision of the city Art Commission, which rejected Tayoun's application for a patio permit. "May people in the city of Philadelphia ignore code requirements . . . and build anything they like?"
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Radnor Township Zoning Hearing Board has come down on the side of a contractor in a contentious case over building a concrete patio in an exclusive housing development despite objections by the homeowners' association. The point of argument is a front yard walkway that a builder extended into a concrete patio at a house under construction in the Inveraray development, off Darby Paoli Road. E.J. Callaghan & Co. Inc., represented by attorney Edward N. Flail Jr., sought the variance for the patio after a construction problem at the sloping property of 401 Inveraray Rd. The entrance had to be altered, Flail said, and the retaining walls were shifted because during construction of the hillside house, the contractor discovered buried tree stumps, lumber and other debris that prevented pouring a safe foundation.
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | By Michele McCreary, Special to The Inquirer
With stipulations and words of caution, the Falls Township Zoning Board unanimously granted a resident a variance to enclose his patio on Tuesday night. Christopher Vitello of 526 Stevens Rd. in Morrisville, whose home is located between Route 1 and Big Oak Road, amended his variance to construct a 12-foot-10-inch-by-17-foot enclosure after the board expressed concern about a 2-foot-2-inch walkway the plan would have created between his pool and the addition. "As unhappy as we make the applicant, we must consider the health hazards of people accidentally falling into the shallow end of the pool," said board member William Sheffer.
NEWS
January 21, 1988 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
The Plymouth Township Zoning Hearing Board has granted a variance to James G. Murray, allowing him to add an enclosed patio in his back yard. The vote Monday night was 5-0. Murray wants to construct a 12-by-15-foot concrete pad and a 12-by-15-foot glass and screen enclosure at the rear of his house. But the addition would encroach 12 feet into the 30-foot, rear-yard setback required by township zoning ordinances. Murray testified that he wanted to build the addition because the Pennsylvania Turnpike, which runs directly behind his house, is very noisy.
NEWS
May 29, 1988 | By S. E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
After nine years, George Leidig is no closer to finishing his patio than the day he stopped construction in 1979. Bricks and lumber for the project rest below the wooden, tar-papered roof from the time the township denied permission for him to complete the structure. During a meeting Wednesday night, the Whitpain Township Zoning Hearing Board voted, 3-0, to deny Leidig's second request to finish the 240-square- foot enclosed patio in the 1700 block of Pemberton Road. The decision upholds the same board's decision of nine years ago, when the township stopped Leidig from completing the patio, which he had started without obtaining a building permit.
NEWS
July 11, 1996 | By Lisa Kozleski, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A proposal by the owners of Chicago's bar to build an outdoor patio brought a storm of protest last night from dozens of residents who complained that the facility has been a problem. Although the bar's attorney, Jim Waller, said the establishment has received but two police calls and no citations in the four years since it opened under its current ownership, several residents painted a very different picture. One man said he has called police half a dozen times in recent months.
LIVING
June 19, 2009 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: We bought patio chairs several years ago. We leave them out of doors year-round, and the material has become discolored. Is there a way to clean them? No holes or any other problems. Answer: Let's talk about cleaning more than just your chairs, if we may, since summer starts this weekend, and it's time to play outdoors. To clean woven furniture, you'll need to get into and around those intricate weaves. And that requires a variety of brushes - a new, rather than used, toothbrush (stiffer bristles)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Friends unfailingly describe Eileen McDonnell, a retired public school speech and hearing therapist, as "quiet" and "reserved. " Except when the conversation turns to nature. Watch her eyes widen and her speech grow animated! "She effervesces," says Andrea V. McCabe, development director at Foulkeways at Gwynedd, the Quaker-affiliated continuing-care retirement community in Montgomery County. McDonnell, 83, formerly of Harleysville, has lived at Foulkeways for a decade, and from Day 1 she's been "effervescing" about the place, trying to boost awareness of the 110-acre campus' flora and fauna.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2014 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there Erin stepped onto the patio of her friends' Ardmore home to get a little air. She saw some guys hanging out on the other side of the short wall separating the twin home's space from the neighbors'. But more important: beagles! "Oh, hi!" Erin said, bounding over the wall that August night in 2010. "I'm Erin. What's your dogs' names?" Erin was most enthralled by "this chubby little dog" named Mildred. Mildred's person, Andrew, was enthralled with Erin. "I thought she was really cute," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Metrione can't remember the names of all the ornamental grasses in her Haddonfield garden, but her affection for them makes an unforgettable impression: "I like their lines. They're taller than most plants that I have, and I just love it when the wind blows - they're all bent over - and I like the ethereal ones that are real fluffy. I like the ones that are heavy with seeds, too. Then they bend differently. I just think they give shape and form and a lot of motion to the garden.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: I have a dry-laid brick patio bordered on three sides by flower beds. Over the years I have noticed that the bricks are turning black on top. This is not from garden soil or mud, and it is not uniform in its coverage. I have thought about scrubbing the bricks with a water-bleach mix, but I am afraid that it will bleach the bricks. What is the black stuff, and how do I get it off without changing brick color? Answer: You can try Oxy-Clean, the oxygenated bleach that we use to clean mildew off 18th-century headstones in our churchyard.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
I N THE SPRING and summer, Marie Zienkewicz, 89, could often be seen on the patio of her apartment in a sprawling, lush Bucks County complex watering her prim flower garden. But Tuesday night, authorities say, the senior citizen's peaceful existence came to a violent end. A bullet from a gunbattle between police and an apparently unhinged resident there found its way into the woman's apartment and killed her. "He didn't solve anything. His life's over," resident Barbara Sussman, 65, said of Andrew G. Cairns, 49, the man accused of barricading himself in the apartment above Zienkewicz's at Jefferson on the Creek apartments, on Street Road near Davisville in Warminster.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brenda Sullivan cautions up front: "You can really get carried away by this. " She's talking about miniature gardens, which can include pint-size fairy gardens - hugely popular, snobsters - and rock and trough gardens, railway gardens and even some Zen gardens. "They're so adorable!" says Sullivan, obviously carried away. They're also way easier than traditional gardens for anyone challenged by age, health, or physical limitation. You don't even have to be mobile to be part of the trend, which parallels others, namely: Container, trough, terrarium, and patio gardening, which are all part of a growing interest in landscapes for small spaces; green roofs and walls, which use some of the same plants; and floral designs made of natural and recycled materials.
NEWS
August 24, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
A reader said there was a 20-foot crack running across her 15-year-old concrete patio that had been repaired with caulking. She asked if she should have the patio repoured. Another reader, who has been in residential construction and building supplies for 45 years, wrote that any 200-square-foot patio that has lasted 15 years with only one crack means the patio was built right in the first place, but with one exception. "The crack tells me the original builder did not put in the correct expansion joints.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2012 | Al Heavens
Question: We have had natural hardwood floors for five years. During that time we had a rug under a coffee table. This week we removed the rug and the wood floor was a much lighter color. What can we do to have the floor return to its original matching finish? Answer: It probably would involve less work if you just let the area darken to match the floor that was exposed to the sun's UV rays. I've seen homeowners use bleach to lighten wood floors with some success but I wouldn't do it myself.
NEWS
July 3, 2011 | By Bill Reed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seven years ago, Len and Mary DeMenczuk decided they were getting too old to run Bristol Borough's landmark King George II Inn, so they sold it and retired to Florida. But the economy conspired against the new owners, so the DeMenczuks are back. Now in their mid-60s, they are working as hard as ever to reopen one of the country's oldest inns, dating to 1681. Yes, George Washington slept there, long before he became president. "We've been working 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., seven days a week for six weeks," Mary DeMenczuk says during a break on the brick patio overlooking the Delaware River.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2010
Dear Martha: How should I prepare my patio furniture for winter storage? A: Although most outdoor furniture is built to withstand the elements, proper maintenance and storage in the offseason helps it last much longer. First, remove the cushions and umbrella, and clean them according to the directions on the label. If there are no instructions, wash them using a sponge and 1/4 cup mild dishwashing liquid, such as Ivory, mixed into 1 gallon of warm water. Rinse the fabric, and then stand the cushions on their sides.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|