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Patrick S Day

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2000 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The two most recent films from Ireland - Angela's Ashes and Agnes Brown - have pivoted on abject poverty. Since St. Patrick's Day is coming, why not celebrate the Irish who struck it rich - or so they thought? Waking Ned Devine, released two years ago, is one of the most engaging Irish comedies in a long time. With the death of Ned Devine, the population of the village of Tully More is reduced to just 52. Clutched in his lifeless hand is a winning lottery ticket worth millions.
NEWS
March 18, 1998 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / TOM GRALISH
Sam Cole, 58, has been a Philadelphia cabbie for 35 years. He's not Irish, but his wife, Annie, is. St. Patrick's Day? That's every day in this shamrocked cab. The sign reads: "One hundred thousand welcomes. " The couple is retiring to County Tyrone on March 29.
NEWS
March 16, 1992 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There was as much marching on the sidelines as in the St. Patrick's Day Parade yesterday, as onlookers who braved the cold temperatures and strong winds stomped their feet for warmth. "This seems more like Mummers Day than March," said Mary Ann Bonner of Chestnut Hill, referring to the New Year's Day parade. She attended the 41st annual St. Patrick's Day event with her Irish-born husband and 4-year-old daughter. It was 35 degrees when the parade began at 1:45 p.m. But winds blowing at 17 miles an hour made it feel like 14 degrees.
NEWS
March 17, 1989
PATRICK WASN'T IRISH, NOR ARE ALL IRISH CATHOLIC After reading the article "Ethnic schism opens over parade marshal," I would like to state a few facts about who St. Patrick really was. In the year 389, Patrick, at age 16, was taken captive from his native land of Brittany in France to Ireland where he worked as a slave for seven years. His occupation as a herder of flocks was fine probation for the holy career that was to be his. After seven years, he managed to escape and returned home.
NEWS
March 17, 1987 | By Paul Scicchitano, Special to The Inquirer
St. Paddy's Day without beer? The devil, you say. But that's just the case at St. Matthew Catholic Church in Conshohocken, where church officials have opted not to hold a St. Patrick's Day celebration this year for what is believed to be the first time in the church's 135-year history. Blame it on the blarney - or, more accurately, on the high cost of liability insurance. The Rev. John J. Foster, pastor, said yesterday that he had canceled the affair because of a bulletin from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia warning that church insurance does not cover events at which alcohol is served.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In Paddington, the poorest of London's Irish neighborhoods, my father ran a pub, and the customers referred to Sean Patrick Darcy fondly and reverently as "Himself. " On any Sunday the bar would be packed after Mass, and one or another of the "navvies" - the scornful English term for the young Irishmen who came over to London to find work on construction sites - would join the ceili band on the dais to sing a melancholy Irish ballad (are there any other kind?). St. Patrick's Day was always different, for it was the one day in the year that Himself would favor us with a song.
NEWS
March 17, 1988 | By SAM GUGINO, Daily News Staff Writer
St. Patrick's Day, always a time for mirth and merriment, will take on the character of an Irish wake at Cavanaugh's Railroad Restaurant & Tavern today. This is the last St. Paddy's celebration at the 52-year-old institution. "Drexel University is scheduled to take over on June 15," explains owner Bill Pawliczek. Pawliczek is the son-in-law of Cavanaugh's founder, Pat Cavanaugh, himself one of a nine-sibling clan, eight of whom were involved in the liquor business. Pawliczek, who took over when Pat died 15 years ago, is moving the operation from 32nd and Market streets to 39th and Sansom.
NEWS
March 17, 1986 | By JOE O'DOWD JR., Daily News Staff Writer
Jim Cavanaugh, the grand marshal of this year's St. Patrick's Day Parade, has marched under much tougher conditions. "I was in the the Bataan Death March. It was 10 days long . . . We marched 89 kilometers. I weighed 120 pounds at the end. " Cavanaugh, 66, of Drexel Hill, is a bit heavier now, eager to talk not of the terrible march, but of St. Patrick. "The purpose of the parade is to honor the patron saint of Ireland, St. Patrick. Irish blood gets thick around this time of year.
NEWS
March 18, 2002 | By MYUNG OAK KIM kimm@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
THERE WAS the usual sea of kilts, bagpipes and shamrocks. But St. Patrick's Day observances here and across the country also included moments of quiet reflection and somber remembrance. Under a threatening gray sky and stiff breeze, Philadelphia's 51st annual parade was highlighted by the appearance of New York City fire and rescue workers who are still searching at Ground Zero for missing colleagues six months after the terrorist attacks. At the parade finale at Logan Circle, about 20 rescue workers stood with their heads bowed, their hats held over their hearts, as the Keystone State Boys Choir of Philadelphia sang the Star Spangled Banner.
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NEWS
March 18, 2013 | John J. Rooney, For the Inquirer
John J. Rooney is emeritus professor of psychology at La Salle University and the author of "Bleachers in the Bedroom: the Swampoodle Irish and Connie Mack" Growing up in one of Philadelphia's many Irish American neighborhoods, I remember St. Patrick's Day with special fondness. It was a day we looked forward to well in advance. Often, when someone complained about the harshness of winter, they would be cheered with an "Ah well, it won't be too long 'til St. Patrick's Day. " It also offered a break from the rigors of Lent.
NEWS
March 20, 2012
An article Monday about St. Joseph's Day gave an incorrect origin for St. Patrick's Day celebrations. March 17, St. Patrick's Day, marks the day he died. A story Monday on an exhibit organized by the Slought Foundation and the University of Pennsylvania incorrectly provided the last names of two Chinese performance artists. Huang Rui's last name is Huang, and Ko Siu Lan's last name is Ko. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357)
NEWS
March 9, 2012
IT'S BEEN said that what you do in life echoes in eternity. Imagine the echoes for teachers like Mark Citron and James Hooker, both in their early 40s, who are accused of having sexual affairs with their students. Regardless of the outcome of their cases, both will have a standing reservation and a special place in Hell for what they have done. It is because of alleged bums like these that good male teachers are constantly looked down upon for the good things that we do with our students.
NEWS
March 8, 2012
LIKE hundreds of thousands of other people of Irish descent in the Philadelphia region, I too am outraged by the culturally insensitive retail policy of Spencer's Gifts that comes into play every year around St. Patrick's Day. This shameless retailer hawks chintzy T-shirts, hats, mugs and other paraphernalia that foster a false and degrading stereotype of the Irish as drunken heathens. These unfunny images and lewd slogans insult a vast and proud ethnic group that largely helped build this great nation and fought for the liberties that bottom-feeders like Spencer's and others abuse through the vulgar products they sell.
NEWS
March 17, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here are the answers to our St. Patrick's Day true-false quiz. 1. TRUE. St. Patrick, perhaps born in Wales or Scotland, was taken to Ireland as a slave. 2. FALSE. St. Patrick was born Maewyn Succat. 3. TRUE. March 17 is the day St. Patrick supposedly died. 4. TRUE. Other big islands with no native snakes include Iceland, New Zealand and Greenland. 5. FALSE. New York City is where Irish soldiers held the first St. Patrick's Day parade in 1762. 6. TRUE. kissing the Blarney Stone is supposed to make one more eloquent.
NEWS
June 3, 2010 | By MICHELLE SKOWRONEK, skowrom@phillynews.com 215-854-5926
Sequins and hot-glue guns are back in the picture for ethnic parades as philanthropist Gerry Lenfest has offered a half-million dollars to the Greater Philadelphia Traditions Fund to help pay for the city's costs. Meanwhile, City Council amended a parade bill yesterday to have the city cover security and cleanup costs. The bill was originally going to cap the fee that the city would charge parades at $7,500. Now, the city will cover basic safety costs and charge parade sponsors for extra necessities such as stage equipment or sound systems, according to Justin DiBerardinis, aide to Councilwoman Maria Quinones Sanchez, the bill's sponsor.
NEWS
March 11, 2010 | By CATHERINE LUCEY, luceyc@phillynews.com 215-854-4172
Councilwoman Maria Quinones-Sanchez wants the city to loosen up on the recent ruling that parades and festivals pay full price for city services they use. Quinones-Sanchez planned to introduce legislation today that would put limits on the amount the city could charge ethnic parades and festivals for police and sanitation costs. A draft of the bill circulated yesterday would set the caps at $4,000 for festivals and $7,500 for parades, although Quinones-Sanchez stressed that the legislation was a work in progress.
NEWS
January 25, 2010 | By CATHERINE LUCEY, luceyc@phillynews.com 215-854-4172
During the past year of city budget cutbacks, one policy has proved extra controversial - requiring special events like parades to pay city costs. Today, city officials plan to meet with representatives from the six annual ethnic parades to discuss the fees for their Center City marches. Councilwoman Maria Quinones Sanchez, who pushed for the sit-down, said she didn't think that the smaller, volunteer-staffed ethnic parades should face the same financial burden as bigger events that attract more donors and corporate sponsorship.
NEWS
March 7, 2006
AS A PROUD Irish-American, I take strong offense at Joe Sixpack's Feb. 24 column. St. Patrick's Day is for remembering and celebrating Irish heritage. For him to say that the day's purpose is to start drinking at sunrise and not stop until you are hugging an empty keg as a sacred rite is downright offensive. I am sure that if he were ridiculing another ethnicity's holiday, he could be fired. But the Irish are supposed to sit back and accept the stereotype that we are nothing but drunks.
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