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Paul Holmgren

SPORTS
May 19, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul Holmgren was an aggressive, feisty player, and he took those characteristics into the Flyers front office, where he wasn't afraid to roll the dice on moves that shook the hockey world. Ron Hextall, who recently replaced Holmgren as the Flyers general manager, was also a combative player, one who holds the all-time NHL record for career penalty minutes (584) by a goalie. But don't expect him to strike with the boldness that marked Holmgren's tenure, one that included the trades of Jeff Carter and Mike Richards and the signing of restricted free-agent Shea Weber to an offer sheet.
SPORTS
May 9, 2014
Name: Ron Hextall Title: Flyers general manager Age: Turned 50 on May 3 Experience: Was the Flyers' assistant GM this past year after serving in the same role for the LA Kings . . . Was part of the managerial staff that helped the Kings win the 2012 Stanley Cup . . . Was also the general manager of the Manchester Monarchs, the Kings' top minor league affiliate . . . Worked in the Flyers' front office from 1999-06, first as a scout and...
SPORTS
May 9, 2014 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Columnist
THE DAY last summer that Flyers general manager Paul Holmgren brought Ron Hextall back from Los Angeles to be his assistant, he knew two things - that he was making the Flyers better, and that he was hiring the guy who would be his replacement. The move was one part self-confident and one part selfless. To me, that will always be Holmgren. He knew what he was doing that day, and the implications. The thing that Holmgren did not know was the timetable. But within 5 months, he was already talking to Hextall about a succession plan.
SPORTS
May 9, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
After an up-and-down, eight-year reign as the Flyers' general manager, Paul Holmgren was elevated Wednesday to club president, a position in which he will oversee the club's business and hockey operations. Holmgren, who handed the GM duties to his top assistant, Ron Hextall, made it clear that he will be only a sounding board for trades and signings, and that Hextall is running the show. "All hockey decisions fall on Ron's lap. No question," Holmgren said, adding that Hextall had the "final say" and "full authority and autonomy.
SPORTS
May 9, 2014 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
IN 2001, not long after he hung up his skates, Ron Hextall was a professional scout for the Flyers. It was his first foray into the front-office world of the NHL - before he was even named the Flyers' director of pro player personnel in 2003. He was serving under Paul Holmgren, the Flyers' assistant general manager to Bob Clarke. One player's name came up in a scouting conversation for an important move and an awkward moment ensued. Holmgren, nearly a decade older, was once Hextall's head coach.
SPORTS
May 9, 2014 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
ABOUT AN hour prior to every Flyers home game this season, long before players even took the ice for warmups, a highlight video played featuring all of Ron Hextall's bloodiest adventures. There was his end-to-end brawl with Toronto's Felix Potvin 1997; the time Washington's Rob Pearson thought it would be smart to stop and say something to Hextall at the Cap Center in 1995; his two-handed slash of Edmonton's Kent Nilsson in the 1987 Stanley Cup finals; and of course, his revenge against Montreal's Chris Chelios during the 1989 playoffs.
SPORTS
May 9, 2014 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
Among Ed Snider, Paul Holmgren, and Ron Hextall - the three men seated at a Wells Fargo Center dais Wednesday to announce Hextall's ascension to general manager and Holmgren's to team president - there were 101 aggregate years of affiliation with the Flyers. That's more than a century's worth of sameness, of immersion in an organization that, for all its strengths and stability, hasn't won a championship since 1975. If nothing else, the news conference certainly had a moose-lodge feel to it. Chops were busted over whether Holmgren or Hextall cried first when Hextall left the Flyers' front office in 2006, whether Hextall did indeed have a Flyers tattoo stamped on his gluteus maximus, whether Snider still held a grudge over Hextall's six-week training-camp holdout in 1989.
SPORTS
May 7, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Of all the Flyers, no one has a more important offseason ahead than Vinny Lecavalier, the 34-year-old forward who is coming off an odd first year with his new team. Whether it was because of a bad back, a position change, or advanced age, one thing is certain: Lecavalier did not have the type of season the Flyers envisioned when they signed him to a five-year $22 million contract. "I don't want to say I'm disappointed in Vinny for the year, but I'm disappointed for him," general manager Paul Holmgren said at the team's season-ending news conference last week.
SPORTS
May 7, 2014 | By Frank Seravalli, Daily News Staff Writer
DANNY BRIERE has as many points in his first six games of the Stanley Cup playoffs as Vinny Lecavalier (2), Michael Raffl (1) and Sean Couturier (0) combined for in the Flyers' seven games against the Rangers. With each additional point Briere nets in Montreal's playoff run, Flyers general manager Paul Holmgren should cringe. Hindsight might be 20/20, yes, but Holmgren's quick decision to cut Briere loose and sign Lecavalier to a 5-year, $22.5 million deal last summer will come back to haunt him. Few would argue that Lecavalier has more upside than Briere.
SPORTS
May 5, 2014 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
PAUL HOLMGREN squirmed in his chair at the dais last night - just a little, he acknowledged. It was not as awkward as his phone call with chairman Ed Snider early morning on Oct. 7, when he woke the Flyers' owner at home to ask his permission to fire Peter Laviolette three (three!) games into the season. "Those are never fun calls to make," Holmgren said. "Anytime you have to deal with Mr. Snider on issues of that nature, he asks tough questions. The tough questions that make you kind of wiggle around in your seat, like I'm doing now. " It was uncomfortable because an hour before he was forced to dissect the Flyers' 38th consecutive season without a Stanley Cup and, therefore, some of his shortfalls as their architect, Snider threw him a bit of a curveball.
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