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Paul Offit

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NEWS
September 17, 2008 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They liken him to a prostitute. Someone with blood on his hands, who doesn't care about the health of children. Those are among the insults that Paul Offit gets by e-mail each week at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. He should probably expect to start getting a lot more. Offit, 57, has been defending the safety of vaccines for years, in response to beliefs that they are tied to autism-related disorders. He continues in the same vein with his new book - Autism's False Prophets: Bad Science, Risky Medicine, and the Search for a Cure - which is already generating heat.
LIVING
October 16, 2000 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the introduction of several new vaccines over the last decade, babies now are being routinely immunized against 11 diseases. At the same time, the memory of once common and sometimes deadly childhood diseases such as measles and whooping cough is fading - making some parents question whether such vaccines are necessary at all. Other parents are shunning vaccines because of reports, none proven, that suggest a link between vaccines and...
NEWS
May 25, 2006
As government plans for a possible global flu pandemic, it's ducking one of the hardest questions: Who gets vaccinated first? The federal plan, released in November and updated earlier this month, painted a worst-case scenario of 2 million deaths, 90 million sick and 10 million hospitalized if a new flu virus emerges and begins spreading human-to-human. The plan depends on vaccination as the ultimate solution. But it is also honest in acknowledging the likelihood of a four- to six-month lag between when the exact virus is identified and when vaccines can be manufactured and distributed.
NEWS
October 10, 1999
"Smallpox was always present, filling the churchyard with corpses, tormenting with constant fear all whom it had not yet stricken, leaving on those whose lives it spared the hideous traces of its power. " So says an account of life in 18th-century England. In the Americas a century earlier, in an example of unintentional biological warfare, smallpox nearly wiped out the Aztecs, Incas and East Coast Native Americans. Today, smallpox is gone, eliminated through immunization, just a dry fact in a history book.
NEWS
December 21, 2002 | By Aparna Surendran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania will have 22,500 doses of smallpox vaccine available to inoculate hospital staff and law enforcement officers, according to the state's smallpox vaccination plan, which was made public yesterday. Vaccinations could begin in late January. The state's Health Department determined the number of initial doses by calculating that the 229 hospitals in Pennsylvania should each have about 50 to 100 staff members available to treat a smallpox victim. Each hospital, however, will determine how many staff members should be vaccinated, said Richard McGarvey, spokesman for the state's Health Department.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2006 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration approved a Merck & Co. Inc. vaccine yesterday for rotavirus, a diarrhea-inducing microbe that strikes millions of U.S. children each year and kills 500,000 worldwide, primarily in developing nations where medical care is inadequate. The vaccine - which is administered orally, by squirting just a few drops in the mouth - was developed over an 11-year period by scientists at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the Wistar Institute. Merck tested it on more than 70,000 infants in 11 countries, in one of the biggest clinical trials performed by a drug company.
NEWS
January 28, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Out of sight of their patients, the doctors and staff at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia were holding onto each other and crying in back offices, in shock over the slaying of Melissa Ketunuti. At some point, the news reports describing details of the pediatrician's killing Monday became so relentless that her colleagues needed desperately to end the noise and talk about her life. So, on Thursday, "we simply commandeered the hospital's chapel," said Paul Offit, chief of the division of infectious diseases and Ketunuti's supervisor.
NEWS
January 26, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Out of sight of their patients, the doctors and staff of The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia were holding onto each other and crying in back offices, in shock over the slaying of Melissa Ketunuti. At some point, the news reports describing details of the CHOP pediatrician's death Monday had become so relentless that her colleagues needed desperately to end the noise and talk about her life. "So we simply commandeered the hospital's chapel on Thursday," said Paul Offit, chief of the division of infectious diseases and Ketunuti's supervisor.
NEWS
December 20, 2002 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Americans may criticize, disobey and sue their physicians, but when it comes to getting the smallpox vaccine, Americans will likely imitate them. A new survey by Harvard University researchers indicates that 80 percent of Americans would refuse precautionary vaccination if they heard that their own and many other physicians were rejecting it. Some physicians already have said no. And several major medical centers, notably Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta and Virginia Commonwealth University's hospital in Richmond, have opted out of the government's vaccination plan.
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NEWS
January 28, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Out of sight of their patients, the doctors and staff at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia were holding onto each other and crying in back offices, in shock over the slaying of Melissa Ketunuti. At some point, the news reports describing details of the pediatrician's killing Monday became so relentless that her colleagues needed desperately to end the noise and talk about her life. So, on Thursday, "we simply commandeered the hospital's chapel," said Paul Offit, chief of the division of infectious diseases and Ketunuti's supervisor.
NEWS
January 26, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Out of sight of their patients, the doctors and staff of The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia were holding onto each other and crying in back offices, in shock over the slaying of Melissa Ketunuti. At some point, the news reports describing details of the CHOP pediatrician's death Monday had become so relentless that her colleagues needed desperately to end the noise and talk about her life. "So we simply commandeered the hospital's chapel on Thursday," said Paul Offit, chief of the division of infectious diseases and Ketunuti's supervisor.
NEWS
February 22, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is food packaging compromising the effectiveness of your child's vaccines? A recent Harvard School of Public Health study suggesting that it might be has rocked parents and pediatricians nationwide. The study looked at PFCs - perfluorinated compounds - a group of chemicals that are used in many kinds of food packaging. They're useful because they resist heat, oil, stains, grease, and water. They keep the microwave popcorn inside the bag and the pizza cheese inside the box instead of leaking out and staining your car seat.
NEWS
November 23, 2011 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a biologist and computer scientist, Pennsylvania State University's Marcel Salathe studies the viral spread of information and the spread of real viruses. Now he has found a link between the two: When the viral idea helps create resistance to vaccines, it leaves a path for real viruses to follow. Using Twitter, he identified regional clusters where people were likely to forgo immunizations. Those could be hot spots of potential outbreaks. The results, published last month, show how social media can be harnessed to identify at-risk areas and to help focus public health messages.
NEWS
January 7, 2011 | By Chelsea Conaboy, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, experts have known that a 1998 paper linking childhood vaccines to autism was fatally flawed. British authorities even stripped the paper's primary author, Andrew J. Wakefield, of his permission to practice medicine. On Wednesday, BMJ, a British medical publisher, sharpened the criticism against Wakefield, painting him as having deliberately manipulated data. It called his work "an elaborate fraud. " Many parents still rally to Wakefield's defense and believe that vaccines may cause autism.
NEWS
September 17, 2008 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They liken him to a prostitute. Someone with blood on his hands, who doesn't care about the health of children. Those are among the insults that Paul Offit gets by e-mail each week at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. He should probably expect to start getting a lot more. Offit, 57, has been defending the safety of vaccines for years, in response to beliefs that they are tied to autism-related disorders. He continues in the same vein with his new book - Autism's False Prophets: Bad Science, Risky Medicine, and the Search for a Cure - which is already generating heat.
NEWS
May 25, 2006
As government plans for a possible global flu pandemic, it's ducking one of the hardest questions: Who gets vaccinated first? The federal plan, released in November and updated earlier this month, painted a worst-case scenario of 2 million deaths, 90 million sick and 10 million hospitalized if a new flu virus emerges and begins spreading human-to-human. The plan depends on vaccination as the ultimate solution. But it is also honest in acknowledging the likelihood of a four- to six-month lag between when the exact virus is identified and when vaccines can be manufactured and distributed.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2006 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration approved a Merck & Co. Inc. vaccine yesterday for rotavirus, a diarrhea-inducing microbe that strikes millions of U.S. children each year and kills 500,000 worldwide, primarily in developing nations where medical care is inadequate. The vaccine - which is administered orally, by squirting just a few drops in the mouth - was developed over an 11-year period by scientists at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the Wistar Institute. Merck tested it on more than 70,000 infants in 11 countries, in one of the biggest clinical trials performed by a drug company.
NEWS
December 21, 2002 | By Aparna Surendran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania will have 22,500 doses of smallpox vaccine available to inoculate hospital staff and law enforcement officers, according to the state's smallpox vaccination plan, which was made public yesterday. Vaccinations could begin in late January. The state's Health Department determined the number of initial doses by calculating that the 229 hospitals in Pennsylvania should each have about 50 to 100 staff members available to treat a smallpox victim. Each hospital, however, will determine how many staff members should be vaccinated, said Richard McGarvey, spokesman for the state's Health Department.
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