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Paul Owens

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SPORTS
January 4, 2004 | By Sam Carchidi INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The last time I saw Phillies icon Paul Owens, he was frail and failing as he leaned on the arms of his prot?g?, club executive Dallas Green, and general manager Ed Wade during emotional closing ceremonies for Veterans Stadium on Sept. 28. That's not the way I will remember The Pope. I will remember how excited he was to attend a high school or college basketball game when one of his grandsons was playing. I will remember how he was a straight shooter, a man who was secure enough in himself - and his beliefs - that he answered questions with candor.
NEWS
October 24, 2002 | By Kristin Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul Owens, 78, of West Philadelphia, a member of the legendary Dixie Hummingbirds gospel group, died of cancer last Thursday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Owens spent 16 years of his singing career with the famed Dixie Hummingbirds, lending his smooth tenor to the tight harmonies of a group considered one of the pillars of gospel music. Before he joined the group in 1948, Mr. Owens had built a reputation as a talented soloist with groups such as the Israelite Gospel Singers and the Baystate Gospel Singers.
SPORTS
March 30, 1998 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A quarter-century later, he's back to the future. A quarter-century after Paul Owens began assembling the greatest team in Phillies history, the Phillies have remembered he's still around. Finally, they are tapping into his font of wisdom again. Finally, they are allowing him to be actively involved in all phases of this team again. Finally, they have hauled his blueprints out of the attic and are using them to rebuild this baseball team the way Owens built his own quasi-dynasty in the '70s.
SPORTS
July 17, 2003 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During Veterans Stadium's final season, The Inquirer will look back weekly at memorable Phillies moments. In the summer of 1983, when Comcast SportsNet was just a distant dream and WIP a dying radio station, sports news wasn't yet a ubiquitous buzz. There was an enormous black hole between the morning papers and the 11 o'clock news, and Philadelphia fans, for the most part, were content to pass those hours in blissful ignorance. So it wasn't unusual that on the night of July 18, 1983, thousands of Phillies fans arrived at Veterans Stadium having not heard a single word about the hastily convened news conference that had taken place on the 400 level a few hours earlier.
SPORTS
May 29, 1998 | By Sam Carchidi, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul Owens, the architect of the best Phillies teams in history, sat in the bleachers at Cherry Hill East High last week, puffed on an unfiltered Chesterfield and exhaled a mouthful. A mouthful of praise, that is. "He reminds me a little of Doc Gooden when I saw him pitching in high school in Tampa," said Owens, now a special assistant with the Phillies, as he watched Toms River North speedballer J.M. Gold deliver a pitch last Friday. "He's the closest I've seen to him in a long time, and what I like about him is that he doesn't waste any motion.
SPORTS
November 7, 1995 | By Marc Narducci, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bishop Eustace's Geoff Owens, a 6-foot-10 center, said last night that he has made an oral commitment to the University of Pennsylvania. Owens, a grandson of Phillies executive Paul Owens, said he chose Penn over Penn State, Rider and Navy. Last season was his first as a varsity basketball starter. Owens averaged 12 points and 10 rebounds a game. "One college told us that Geoff was the best-kept secret in the country, and I agree," Eustace coach Bill Lange said. "He still hasn't tapped all his ability, and his work ethic is incredible.
SPORTS
March 8, 2010 | by Daily News Staff
BIO   Charles Fuqua Manuel Age: 66 Birthdate: Jan. 4, 1944, in North Fork, W.Va. Major league career: 1969-75, he played 4 years with the Twins and 2 years with the Dodgers. Major league numbers: .198 average, 242 games, 384 at-bats, 25 runs, 76 hits, 12 doubles, 0 triples, 4 home runs, 43 RBI 40 walks, 77 strikeouts, .273 on-base percentage, .260 slugging percentage. Managing career: 9 years in minor leagues (610-588); 2-plus years with Cleveland Indians (220-190)
SPORTS
February 20, 1996 | By Marc Narducci, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Geoff Owens finished his freshman year at Bishop Eustace, he made a decision that eventually would change his future. Owens chose to forgo baseball and concentrate on basketball. He hasn't regretted that decision one bit. Owens, a former power-hitting first baseman, will continue his basketball career next season at the University of Pennsylvania, where he also plans to major in pre-med. Entering yesterday's game against Overbrook, the 6-foot-11, 200-pound center was averaging 16.4 points, 14 rebounds and 7 blocked shots for Eustace, which is expected to seriously contend for the South Jersey Parochial B title.
SPORTS
July 31, 1995 | by Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Writer
Jokingly, Rich Ashburn told Mayor Rendell that the Mummers should be part of the festivities. Well, that can-do mayor placed a call and, wouldn't you know it, six Mummers were in town by Saturday night. One problem: There were no rooms left. And even the can-do mayor couldn't solve that. The Mummers ended up taking naps in their cars and rose at dawn to play. They weren't the only early risers. By 9 a.m., the field surrounding the outdoor stage was dotted with red-dressed people.
NEWS
July 10, 2011
To help get ready for Tuesday's Major League Baseball All-Star Game in Arizona, see what you know about past games. 1. The first All-Star Game was played in 1933. Where? a. Fenway Park, Boston. b. Comiskey Park, Chicago. c. Polo Grounds, New York. d. Wrigley Field, Chicago. 2. When was the first All-Star Game played in Philadelphia? a. 1943. b. 1953. c. 1967. d. 1976. 3. When was the last time the game was played in Philadelphia?
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
September 29, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Half-century-old relics from the 1964 Phillies are scattered all over this region like pieces of a shattered heart. The baseballs Jim Bunning autographed, the Dick Allen rookie cards, the team photos, the yellowed newspaper clippings, the Phillies merchandise that sold as briskly here that memorable summer as Beatles records. Strips of unused World Series tickets, as if awaiting some magical reversal of fate, are kept in scrapbooks, displayed in frames, stored in safe-deposit boxes.
SPORTS
June 26, 2013 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
A WET SPOT. That, Al Holland believes some 30 years later, is what stopped the 1983 Phillies short of reaching their ultimate destiny. Not a slew of aging stars with dwindling bats. Not the suddenly silent bat of their one bona fide slugger once the postseason began. And certainly not because of inexperienced call-ups wilting under pressure. A wet spot on the left side of the Veterans Stadium diamond, made perhaps by a leaky tarp that covered the field during rain the day before Game 3 of their World Series against Baltimore.
SPORTS
June 26, 2013 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Columnist
THEY WERE OLD. So many guys in their 40s. Old baseball guys creak when they run and they run a step slower. They make a whistling, tea-kettle sound when they go first to third or second to home. Wheeze Kids, that's what I nicknamed that 1983 Phillies team, and it stuck. A spinoff of Whiz Kids, the nickname for that swaggering, young Phillies bunch that won the pennant in 1950, only to get swept by the Yankees in the World Series. Throw enough mud at the wall and some of it sticks.
SPORTS
June 25, 2013 | BY ED BARKOWITZ, Daily News Staff Writer barkowe@phillynews.com
THE 1983 Phillies made it to the World Series almost in spite of themselves. There was enough bickering and backbiting to make three MTV reality shows. The players were frustrated by the uncertainty of their roles. Stars felt disrespected and openly questioned the sanity of management, namely president Bill Giles and general manager/manager Paul Owens. Giles and Owens mostly shrugged, and the Phillies just kept winning. Here is a look at some of the saltier verbal nukes tossed around Veterans Stadium during that wildly perplexing season: * "I think it was the result of inexperience," said ex-manager Pat Corrales, who was fired in midseason with a 43-42 record that still was enough for first place.
NEWS
July 10, 2011
To help get ready for Tuesday's Major League Baseball All-Star Game in Arizona, see what you know about past games. 1. The first All-Star Game was played in 1933. Where? a. Fenway Park, Boston. b. Comiskey Park, Chicago. c. Polo Grounds, New York. d. Wrigley Field, Chicago. 2. When was the first All-Star Game played in Philadelphia? a. 1943. b. 1953. c. 1967. d. 1976. 3. When was the last time the game was played in Philadelphia?
SPORTS
March 8, 2010 | by Daily News Staff
BIO   Charles Fuqua Manuel Age: 66 Birthdate: Jan. 4, 1944, in North Fork, W.Va. Major league career: 1969-75, he played 4 years with the Twins and 2 years with the Dodgers. Major league numbers: .198 average, 242 games, 384 at-bats, 25 runs, 76 hits, 12 doubles, 0 triples, 4 home runs, 43 RBI 40 walks, 77 strikeouts, .273 on-base percentage, .260 slugging percentage. Managing career: 9 years in minor leagues (610-588); 2-plus years with Cleveland Indians (220-190)
SPORTS
December 22, 2009
IN THE PANTHEON of truly thankless jobs, major league baseball traveling secretary ranks somewhere between bomb-squad defuser and deckhand on a Bering Sea crab trawler. The good news is you get to see 162 baseball games a year. And you not only get the bonus of spending most of the winter in Florida or Arizona setting up all the spring-training logistics, you actually arrange most of your team's exhibition schedule. The bad news is that for 81 of those games, you are a concierge-to-go.
SPORTS
October 15, 2009
BEFORE THERE WAS Black Friday - Oct. 7, 1977 - the Phillies endured Soggy Saturday and Sunless Sunday. Sunday was the day general manager Paul Owens and manager Danny Ozark learned the real difference between a team that would win 101 games for the second straight season and a Los Angeles Dodgers team of similar talents. It was the day the words "bleeping Dodgers" were hurled in scatalogical volleys with shortstop Larry Bowa leading a profane chorus. They were in LA for a three-game weekend series.
SPORTS
April 10, 2009
PHILLIES GOT the rings. Braves gave the fingers. Until the bottom of the seventh, that is, when a bat-around plus four made Atlanta's 10-3 lead go away faster than a family-of-four $100 bill on Ashburn Alley. Three letters came to mind when I saw the TV closeup of clubby/traveling sec Frank Coppenbarger hefting his 2008 World Series ring, featuring the High Hopes Diamonds. All 103 of them. Touch 'em all, Ruth Madoff. You will never see a bigger ring the rest of your life. Hell, in her elegant prime, twig-thin Audrey Hepburn could have worn Ryan Howard's as a waistband.
NEWS
October 22, 2008 | By Jayson Stark, For The Inquirer
1982: There was nothing the great Paul Owens enjoyed more in life than making The Big Trade. The bigger, the better. And it was the best of those deals - for Tug McGraw, for Garry Maddox, for Bake McBride, for Manny Trillo, for many more - that defined the Pope's inimitable legacy and transformed his team from punching bag to champions. But not this year. This was the year of two of the worst of those deals. The year began and ended with two of Owens' least popular, most second-guessed trades ever.
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