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Paul Simon

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1987 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
George Hamilton will star in his own television comedy series called "Spies. " The hour-long show debuts at 8 p.m. March 3 on CBS. Hamilton plays a former secret agent who's persuaded to come out of retirement and put his special talents to use once again as an agent for the U.S. government. The series replaces "The Wizard," which is moving to Thursdays in the 8- to-9 p.m. slot, bumping "Shell Game," which has been canceled and airs for the last time on Feb. 12. BACK TO AFRICA Paul Simon is planning another trip to Africa for a Showtime cable special to air on Feb. 14. The musical will be taped in Harare, Zimbabwe; guests include African musicians Hugh Masekela and Miriam Makeba, and the groups Stimela and Ladysmith Black Mambazo, who performed on Simon's Graceland album, which was recorded in South Africa last year.
NEWS
July 17, 2006 | By Keith Harris FOR THE INQUIRER
Older pop stars often serve up predictably balanced career overviews in concert - that's a safe way to keep everybody happy, after all. But it also keeps a musician from sharing his own perspective on what parts of his past he values most. Paul Simon's Saturday night show at the Borgata was indeed career-spanning, ranging from his earliest '60s hits to material from his newest album, Surprise. But the set left little doubt what music Simon considers the center of that body of work: his 1986 fling with South African music, Graceland.
NEWS
June 6, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Paul Simon's new album, So Beautiful or So What, is his best in over 20 years, his first worth caring about since 1990's The Rhythm of the Saints . Having said that, this return to relevance by a now 69-year-old pivotal '60s generation songwriter, has also been greeted with overheated acclaim. It finds him contemplating his own mortality with sometimes insightful ("The Afterlife") and sometimes banal ("Questions for the Angels") results. The best thing about So Beautiful or So What is that it brought Simon out on the road with a superb eight-piece band for a sold-out show at the Merriam Theater on Broad Street on Saturday night (the first of a two-night Philadelphia stand)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1998 | By Henry Goldman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The audience had gone after offering its appreciative, if not thunderous, applause. The theater was almost empty. Of those who remained, few noticed when Paul Simon slipped inside and took a mid-orchestra seat. He wore his trademark baseball cap and a well-worn leather jacket, gazing up at the stage and quietly discussing the night's performance with an associate. Only seven shows remained before Thursday night, when The Capeman - the project that has consumed his creative life for close to 10 years - opens on Broadway.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
MOUNT AIRY-raised comedian Paul F. Tompkins is making moves into sitcoms. He'll star in an ABC pilot, playing Teddy, a father who moves his family from the city to New Hampshire to open up tourist cottages. He'll star alongside "Saturday Night Live" vet Molly Shannon . You might have caught Tompkins on HBO's cult classic "Mr. Show with Bob and David" or IFC's "Comedy Bang Bang" or as a voice on Fox's "Bob's Burgers. "   Lauren Hart back on TV Lauren Hart , who used to co-host NBC's "10!
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
I had to ask. Art Garfunkel is playing shows at the Philadelphia Museum of Art on Friday and Saturday nights. On one of those nights - Friday, to be precise - Paul Simon, whose surname is forever hitched to Garfunkel's by an unspoken ampersand, is also in town, playing the Wells Fargo Center on his tour with Sting. So . . . ? "Now, Sam, I'm going to get very careful," Garfunkel deadpanned on the line from his home in New York. "Let's see what Mr. Adams wants to do with this connection.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vintage boomer tours have gotten so numerous that acts are now apparently going out on the road in alphabetical tandems. That would explain the charmed Paul Simon/Sting commingling at the Wells Fargo Center on Friday night. In a brisk and deftly paced evening, the two singer/songwriters alternated solo sets with collaborative segments. But the most poignant moments came unexpectedly, when they interpreted each other's songs - Paul Simon singing "Fragile" to Sting's flamenco guitar accompaniment and Sting, after recalling his first show in Philadelphia with the Police at Grendel's Lair on South Street, serenading the crowd with Simon & Garfunkel's "America.
NEWS
November 12, 1987 | By David Lieber, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite an appearance that evokes an image of Wally Cox rather than John F. Kennedy, Democratic presidential candidate Paul Simon of Illinois drew a packed house at Swarthmore College Monday. So many people jammed inside the building, lined up in the aisles and even in the windows, that dozens were turned away outside. Simon made them laugh the way Harry Truman did, promised to run an active government the way Franklin D. Roosevelt did, stressed the importance of youthful idealism as John F. Kennedy did and vowed to lead a human rights- oriented foreign policy as Jimmy Carter did. The 58-year-old U.S. senator said, "We have to dream about the kind of nation and kind of world we want to build.
NEWS
April 1, 2013 | By Hillel Italie, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Phil Ramone, 79, the masterful Grammy Award-winning engineer, arranger, and producer whose platinum touch included recordings with Ray Charles, Billy Joel, and Paul Simon, has died, his family said Saturday. Mr. Ramone's son, Matt Ramone, confirmed the death. The family did not immediately release details of the death, but Matt Ramone said his father was "very loving and will be missed. " Few in the recording industry enjoyed a more spectacular and diverse career. Mr. Ramone won 14 competitive Grammy Awards and one for lifetime achievement.
NEWS
March 19, 1988 | By Robert Zausner, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Sen. Paul Simon, fresh from his first victory in the Democratic presidential race, ventured into Pennsylvania yesterday and immediately acted to cement his ties with the Keystone State. "My mother-in-law was originally from Germantown, just outside of Philadelphia," Simon told several hundred spectators at a news conference in the Capitol Rotunda. "When I'm in Pennsylvania, I feel like I'm in home territory," he said. "An industrial state, with coal and steel and agriculture.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vintage boomer tours have gotten so numerous that acts are now apparently going out on the road in alphabetical tandems. That would explain the charmed Paul Simon/Sting commingling at the Wells Fargo Center on Friday night. In a brisk and deftly paced evening, the two singer/songwriters alternated solo sets with collaborative segments. But the most poignant moments came unexpectedly, when they interpreted each other's songs - Paul Simon singing "Fragile" to Sting's flamenco guitar accompaniment and Sting, after recalling his first show in Philadelphia with the Police at Grendel's Lair on South Street, serenading the crowd with Simon & Garfunkel's "America.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
MOUNT AIRY-raised comedian Paul F. Tompkins is making moves into sitcoms. He'll star in an ABC pilot, playing Teddy, a father who moves his family from the city to New Hampshire to open up tourist cottages. He'll star alongside "Saturday Night Live" vet Molly Shannon . You might have caught Tompkins on HBO's cult classic "Mr. Show with Bob and David" or IFC's "Comedy Bang Bang" or as a voice on Fox's "Bob's Burgers. "   Lauren Hart back on TV Lauren Hart , who used to co-host NBC's "10!
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
I had to ask. Art Garfunkel is playing shows at the Philadelphia Museum of Art on Friday and Saturday nights. On one of those nights - Friday, to be precise - Paul Simon, whose surname is forever hitched to Garfunkel's by an unspoken ampersand, is also in town, playing the Wells Fargo Center on his tour with Sting. So . . . ? "Now, Sam, I'm going to get very careful," Garfunkel deadpanned on the line from his home in New York. "Let's see what Mr. Adams wants to do with this connection.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
When the Polyphonic Spree debuted in 2000, it was hard to tell if the Dallas-based orchestral ensemble and choir were joking around with their up-with-people approach to plush pop or if they were indeed happy to Hosanna-in-the-highest. With its 20-plus members dressed in flowing robes, and songwriter Tim DeLaughter's teenage symphonies to God (how Brian Wilson described the Beach Boys' Pet Sounds , an album that's influenced the Spree), audiences couldn't tell if the band was a hip, holy-vibing choir or merely people playing a part.
NEWS
April 1, 2013 | By Hillel Italie, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Phil Ramone, 79, the masterful Grammy Award-winning engineer, arranger, and producer whose platinum touch included recordings with Ray Charles, Billy Joel, and Paul Simon, has died, his family said Saturday. Mr. Ramone's son, Matt Ramone, confirmed the death. The family did not immediately release details of the death, but Matt Ramone said his father was "very loving and will be missed. " Few in the recording industry enjoyed a more spectacular and diverse career. Mr. Ramone won 14 competitive Grammy Awards and one for lifetime achievement.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Many a demographic is super-served throughout the year on the Philadelphia film festival calendar. Cineastes with particular interests are catered to by the Latin American, Jewish, Terror, Gay & Lesbian, Science, Asian American and Animation film festivals, among others, not to mention the overarching Philadelphia Film Festival, which will take place in October this year. Add another group of movie buffs to the list: music fans. Starting this week, the inaugural XPN Music Film Festival will take place in University City, with 20 movies screening, mostly at the Annenberg Center on the University of Pennsylvania campus.
NEWS
September 27, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO - Jessy Dixon, a singer and songwriter who introduced his energetic style of gospel music to wider audiences by serving as pop-singer Paul Simon's opening act, died yesterday. He was 73. Miriam Dixon said her brother died at his Chicago home. She said he had been sick but declined to provide details. During a more than 50-year career, Dixon wrote songs for several performers, including jazz and rhythm and blues singer Randy Crawford. He later wrote songs performed by Cher, Diana Ross, Natalie Cole and Amy Grant.
NEWS
June 6, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Paul Simon's new album, So Beautiful or So What, is his best in over 20 years, his first worth caring about since 1990's The Rhythm of the Saints . Having said that, this return to relevance by a now 69-year-old pivotal '60s generation songwriter, has also been greeted with overheated acclaim. It finds him contemplating his own mortality with sometimes insightful ("The Afterlife") and sometimes banal ("Questions for the Angels") results. The best thing about So Beautiful or So What is that it brought Simon out on the road with a superb eight-piece band for a sold-out show at the Merriam Theater on Broad Street on Saturday night (the first of a two-night Philadelphia stand)
SPORTS
February 25, 2011 | by Paul Hagen
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Paul Arnold is a violinist for the Philadelphia Orchestra and also a baseball fan whose lifetime rooting interests have been divided neatly into two equal parts. He's 54 years old. Spent the first 27 of those living in New York and pulling for the Yankees. Been a Philadelphian the last 27 years and, along the way, became a Phillies phanatic. "There's definitely a rooting half-life involved," he noted. The transformation is so complete that there was never any doubt where his rooting interest resided when his former and present clubs met two autumns ago with the championship of all of baseball on the line.
NEWS
July 17, 2006 | By Keith Harris FOR THE INQUIRER
Older pop stars often serve up predictably balanced career overviews in concert - that's a safe way to keep everybody happy, after all. But it also keeps a musician from sharing his own perspective on what parts of his past he values most. Paul Simon's Saturday night show at the Borgata was indeed career-spanning, ranging from his earliest '60s hits to material from his newest album, Surprise. But the set left little doubt what music Simon considers the center of that body of work: his 1986 fling with South African music, Graceland.
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