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Paul Taylor

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NEWS
October 25, 1991 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
After the local premiere on Tuesday of Paul Taylor's homage to the Andrews Sisters, Company B, Taylor led Maxene Andrews on stage for a curtain call and coaxed a few boogies out of her. Naturally, the audience cheered, and for a moment there, the air had the same sweet smell of success that engulfed the dance when the Houston Ballet premiered it in June at the Kennedy Center. We're talking about curtain calls, however. My second look at the dance itself, which the Paul Taylor Dance Company is performing in New York for the first time during its run through Nov. 3 at the City Center, removes some of the smash-hit gloss from a work that promised to do for Taylor what Sinatra Songs did for Twyla Tharp.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1994 | By Gary Parks, FOR THE INQUIRER
A gambling man, choreographer Paul Taylor struck a deal with six of his dancers: He would produce their own choreography as part of his company's 40th-anniversary season - plum exposure for any young dancemaker - provided they would allow him to combine and rearrange their efforts in whatever way he thought best. So Sandra Stone, Mary Cochran, Hernando Cortez, David Grenke, Andrew Asnes and Patrick Corbin set to work. The result is the antic Funny Papers, which his company premiered last week in New York City as part of a two-week engagement.
NEWS
April 29, 1987 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
Violence and despair have been the province of choreographers since the turn of the century, but ugly dancing is Paul Taylor's beat alone. In this style, the typically sleek line of the dancer is scrunched, producing a figure that is all elbows. Dance as hop, skip and jump becomes dance as hobble, crawl and squat. Taylor's most recent dance for his troupe, which is performing at the City Center through May 17, is another of his ugly works. It's called Syzygy, and seeing it alongside the likes of the beautiful Aureole and the enthralling Esplanade proves what I have long suspected: Pretty is more interesting than ugly.
LIVING
November 15, 2000 | By Judith Mackrell, FOR THE INQUIRER
What are the advantages of being Paul Taylor and aging into one of the world's most venerated choreographers of modern dance? Having a "spiffy" development director called Darcy, maybe, who forces you into a new designer suit when your old one has grown too ancient to take another curtain call. Or being so famous that the queen of England inadvertently suffers you to feel her royal behind. This last incident involved an uncharacteristic failure in timing, when Taylor, politely pushing down Her Majesty's theater seat for her when she was visiting his company in London, didn't get his hand out fast enough as she sat down.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1998 | By Susan Reiter, FOR THE INQUIRER
Try asking Paul Taylor what gets him started on making a new dance, and the acclaimed choreographer will innocently explain that his company's rehearsal periods are scheduled way in advance, "and that's when I'm supposed to come up with something new. " No heady pontificating about the motivations behind the need to choreograph. He is a sly one, coming across as gently ingenuous while year after year producing brilliantly varied new dances. But as he notes in a humorously apologetic way, "I never know what to say about dances.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1993 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
After Twyla Tharp, Paul Taylor is the only modern-dance choreographer who creates smash hits. His latest, the two-year-old Company B, finally arrived in Philadelphia on Thursday when the Paul Taylor Dance Company began a three-day run at the Annenberg Center as part of the Dance Celebration series. The first and last thing to know about Company B is that it is set to Andrews Sisters songs. Since you only have to run a fragment of one of these tunes through your head for your knees to start bouncing happily, first and last question to ask about the dance is why didn't anyone think to choreograph to the music before?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1992 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
In 1957, a young upstart by the name of Paul Taylor presented a solo that earned him the most famous review in dance history: four inches of blank space. For decades people have wondered whether that review, written by Louis Horst in a dance magazine, was an easy dismissal of an easily dismissible dance, or an appropriately witty riposte to a witty dance. On Wednesday, the Paul Taylor Dance Company presented Epic for the first time since its premiere. It was done during the troupe's regular season, which runs through Nov. 8 at City Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1988 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
There is no question that a world premiere here by one of the world's great choreographers, Paul Taylor, is a cultural coup for Philadelphia. Thursday's premiere of Speaking in Tongues at the Annenberg Center will be the first time in five years that Taylor's company has unveiled a new piece outside New York. The work was commissioned by Dance Celebration, with funds from the Pew Charitable Trusts and from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, which awarded its first-ever grant to an out-of-state choreographer.
NEWS
April 3, 1990 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
At a time when the dance market grows increasingly competitive, it is astounding that some companies should get so far on so little. A case in point is the Parsons Dance Company, which last night was at the Annenberg Center as part of Dance Celebration's New Dance series. David Parsons started off with a bang, which makes the dwindling of his vision all the more disappointing. The bang was Caught, a solo he made for himself in 1982. In it, he had the brilliant idea of being repeatedly caught in mid-air by strobe lighting, creating the wonderful illusion of perpetual flight.
NEWS
October 23, 1986 | By JIM SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
Security officers Paul Taylor and Clarence Arnett said they couldn't believe their eyes yesterday when they checked the purse of a Philadelphia woman who wanted to visit her probation officer in the U.S. Courthouse. The woman allegedly had placed the bag on the X-ray machine and metal detector in the lobby of the courthouse, which all visitors must do to be admitted to the upper floors of the building at 6th and Market streets. Taylor and Arnett said they found more than four ounces of marijuana, 30 glassine bags containing cocaine, more than 100 pills and about $2,700 in cash in the handbag.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
Dance Celebration favorite David Parsons came to town with his company, Parsons Dance, Thursday night for a run at the Annenberg Center and infused the audience with his playful spirit. The 1993 Bachiana showed early influences that Parsons took with him from his days in Paul Taylor's company. Lots of skipping steps, jumping jacks, a fractured Swan Lake quartet for the ladies and headstands for the guys that turned Bach's music on its head and left Sarah Braverman holding her partner by the ankles as if he were a giant fish she just caught.
NEWS
March 19, 2014
IT'S NO SECRET that many members of the so-called millennial generation are struggling financially. They may be the first cohort to end up worse off than their parents. The sheer number of millennials - about 80 million - makes them a significant force in the U.S. economy. But many of them have trouble accurately answering basic personal-finance questions, spend more than they make and are worried about their debt, according to a new survey by the Investor Education Foundation of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority.
NEWS
October 27, 2013 | By Nancy G. Heller, For The Inquirer
The dances Paul Taylor has created over the last half-century evoke everything from lyrical romance to savage satire, frank eroticism, and slapstick humor. All were on display Thursday night as the Paul Taylor Dance Company opened its run at the Annenberg Center with a four-part program. Choreographed in 1979, Profiles is still a revelation, featuring complex, unexpected lifts and leans. Four dancers pose like ancient Egyptian statues, then leap at each other to form highly improbable two-person shapes.
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
After 60 years as one of America's most beloved dance makers, 83-year-old Paul Taylor could rest on his laurels. But he won't. Like his late peer Merce Cunningham and onetime mentor Martha Graham, Taylor has carved his own path in the genre and, as they did, continues creating new work well beyond the point at which many artists retire. In the 1950s and '60s, as others pioneered pure dance, abstract, or conceptual works, Taylor continued to choreograph work that was, and is, delighted to tackle narrative, emotion, humor, and sheer beauty.
NEWS
November 22, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doris Zimmermann Taylor, 96, of Haverford, librarian emeritus of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, died Monday, Nov. 15, at Bryn Mawr Hospital. After joining the research department of the Federal Reserve Bank in 1944, Mrs. Taylor edited the bank's in-house magazine and established "The Fed in Print," a national index to Federal Reserve Bank publications. In the 1950s, she curated "Coins of Bible Times," a traveling exhibit of coins from 700 B.C. to A.D. 325. Later, she pioneered the use of computers to produce library catalog cards, her great-nephew Ed Lawler said.
NEWS
September 10, 2010 | Merilyn Jackson, Inquirer dance critic
It may seem odd in this economy, but here comes the richest, most varied fall dance season in a few years. With music by Philip Glass and film overlay by Sol LeWitt, Lucinda Childs? black-and-white modern classic Dance powered through town over the weekend as part of the Live Arts Festival, but two of her reconstructed works will be here next month. A seismic shift from Childs? minimalist work in concept, color, music, and choreography, David Parsons? exhilarating Remember Me comes in December.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2008 | By Nancy G. Heller FOR THE INQUIRER
A world without Lisa Viola dancing in it is unthinkable. But, in fact, this is her final season with the Paul Taylor Dance Company, which began a three-day run at the Annenberg Center on Thursday night. If you've never seen Viola onstage, where she is the master of everything from anguished stillness to slapstick humor, you have only two more chances to do so. But there are plenty of other reasons to see the Taylor troupe - the 15 other cast members, all of whom are wonderful, plus two-thirds of the choreography (for Thursday's Program A, which will be repeated at today's matinee; Program B will be shown tonight)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2007 | By Ellen Dunkel FOR THE INQUIRER
Last year, Pennsylvania Ballet had more than its share of ups and downs. For every lovely performance, there were many more with sloppy mistakes. It was frustrating to see so much potential tarnished so badly. My wish at the end of the season was for the dancers to come back in fall more polished and with a boost of confidence. They did. If Wednesday night's season opener was evidence of what's to come, the company's 44th season should be delightful. The dancers attacked the movement as they rarely did last year; the company as a whole looked upgraded.
NEWS
March 9, 2004 | By Miriam Seidel FOR THE INQUIRER
You might wonder what the connection is between a rare appearance by Philadelphia dance legend Hellmut Gottschild and the bust-out dancing of the Silver-Brown Dance company, on a double bill that added up to one juicy evening at the Community Education Center. The answer is percussionist Toshi Makihara. This wizard of sonic improv performed a duet with Gottschild, and will be creating a work with Silver-Brown that will debut in New York and tour Japan next year. Gottschild, known for co-founding Group Motion and leading the old ZeroMoving Dance Company, is still a mellifluous and inventive mover.
NEWS
April 8, 2003 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
Anyone who was both a tap dancer and a pilot must have his feet on the ground and his head in the air. As a tap dancer growing up in Brooklyn, F. Randolph Swartz - almost always called Randy - regularly appeared on television's Children's Hour. And before getting his pilot's license, he was a filmmaker, newspaper reporter and international ballet judge. Now an impresario, Swartz, 57, is celebrating his 20th anniversary as director of Dance Celebration, which he founded at the Walnut Street Theatre and copresents with Penn Presents at the Annenberg Center for the Arts.
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