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Paul Williams

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NEWS
May 6, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Paul Williams, 71, of Villas, N.J., who retired in 1989 as assistant fire chief at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, died of lung cancer Wednesday, April 30, at home. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Williams attended what is now West Catholic Preparatory High School but left to help support the family because his father died when he was very young, daughter Wendy Hueftle said. Mr. Williams served a four-year enlistment as an Air Force firefighter, and while stationed at a Royal Air Force base near Sculthorpe in Norfolk, England, he met and married his British wife, Wendy.
NEWS
June 24, 2000 | NORMAN Y. LONO / FOR THE DAILY NEWS
Philadelphia director Charles Stone III (foreground) has snagged the prestigious Cannes Film Festival Gold Lions and Grand Prix for his "Whassup?!" Budweiser commercials. Stone wrote, directed and co-starred in the popular spot, which featured his hometown buddies speaking the famous line. It was chosen over 5,757 entries from around the world. Also pictured with Stone, son of former Daily News columnist Chuck Stone, are (from left) Paul Williams, Scott "Dookie" Brooks and Fred Thomas Jr.
NEWS
October 21, 2003
ISN'T THERE AN infield fight rule in baseball? As in - what goes on in the field stays in the field? Guess not now that Boston police today are asking for assault and battery charges against Yankees pitcher Jeff Nelson and right fielder Karim Garcia for a bullpen fight with a Red Sox groundskeeper. Next to Chicago Cubs fan and foul ball fumbler Steve Bartman, Paul Williams, a Fenway groundskeeper, has become the most famous non-athlete to emerge from this fall's baseball classics.
SPORTS
May 2, 2008 | By BILL FLEISCHMAN For the Daily News
On her daily runs, Anne Mahlum would see the homeless men standing near the shelter at 13th and Vine streets. She and the homeless would wave to each other. One day last year, Mahlum had an idea: She would start a running club involving the homeless. She arranged a meeting with the shelter's director. "Nine guys were interested, so I found a way to get shoes and clothes donated," Mahlum said Wednesday. Mahlum, the founder and president of Back On My Feet, and about 30 BOMF members will run in Sunday's 29th annual 10-mile Blue Cross Broad Street Run. BOMF is a nonprofit organization that promotes self-sufficiency.
NEWS
April 11, 2013
Climate change could be bumpy LONDON - Tourists, exchange students, and business travelers: It's time to buckle up. More pollution is likely to mean bumpier flights for transatlantic travelers, researchers say, predicting increased turbulence over the North Atlantic as carbon dioxide levels rise. In a paper published Monday in the journal Nature Climate Change, University of East Anglia climate expert Manoj Joshi and colleague Paul Williams ran a climate simulation that cranked up the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to twice its pre-industrial level - roughly 50 percent more than now. Williams said they ran a series of turbulence-predicting algorithms for the North Atlantic winter period and compared the results with pre-industrial rates.
SPORTS
November 22, 2010 | By BERNARD FERNANDEZ, fernanb@phillynews.com
ATLANTIC CITY - A physicist doing a scientific paper on the aerodynamics of baseball could lecture on the whys and wherefores of a 100-mph fastball. He no doubt would expound at length about such things as arm velocity, leg drive, body torque and release point. He'd also probably make the subject matter seem stupefyingly boring. Some things, like a Nolan Ryan heater buzzed under a hitter's chin, are better experienced than explained. And the same holds true of a truly spectacular knockout punch, the kind that can instantaneously separate the recipient from his senses.
NEWS
June 17, 1998 | by Scott Williams, New York Daily News
Since he got sober, Paul Williams is having the time of his life - again. "I feel like I'm living a second life," Williams, 57, said last week. He had called to talk about how, on July 7, he becomes a regular on CBS's soap "The Bold and the Beautiful" (1:30 p.m. weekdays, Channel 10), playing a recovering alcoholic. "I'm just happy not to be playing an elf," the diminutive composer-singer-actor said, laughing. "I'm delighted that my shoes aren't pointed and don't roll over on top. " Back in the '70s, Williams was an icon of Hollywood pop, co-writing the classics "We've Only Just Begun," "Rainy Days and Mondays," "Just an Old-Fashioned Love Song," "I Won't Last a Day Without You" and his Oscar-winning "Evergreen," for the 1976 remake of "A Star Is Born.
SPORTS
September 29, 2002 | By Kristian Pope INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Late in Ocean City's football game yesterday against Atlantic City, Red Raiders coach Gary Degenhardt pulled a handkerchief from his pocket and slowly wiped his face. His players behind him, also feeling the heat, started to move nervously on the sideline. These were not signs of a team with a big lead late in the game. On the other sideline, however, things were just getting good for Atlantic City. Ocean City withstood a feverish, final five minutes to walk off the field at blustery Carey Stadium a 21-14 winner in the Cape-Atlantic League contest on a picturesque day near the boardwalk.
NEWS
October 29, 1998 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Television Critic
Living long is the best revenge. And it pays to be on time. Those are just a couple of the lessons of NBC's four-hour mini-series "The Temptations," a history of the Motown group as seen through the eyes of Otis Williams, the one guy who survived it all. Since 1961, 19 men have been members of the group, which released its most recent album, "Phoenix Rising," in August. But only Williams, whose 1989 book, "Temptations: Motown Supergroup," inspired the mini-series, has been a Temp from Day One. And Melvin Franklin, Eddie Kendricks, Paul Williams and David Ruffin, who rose to fame with him in the '60s with hits like "The Way You Do the Things You Do" and "My Girl"?
SPORTS
May 30, 2012 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
JOHNNY TAPIA, the five-time boxing champion whose turbulent career was marked by cocaine addiction, alcohol, depression and run-ins with the law, was found dead Sunday at his home in Albuquerque, N.M. He was 45. Authorities were called to the house at about 7:45 p.m. on Sunday, spokesman Robert Gibbs said. The death didn't appear to be suspicious, he said. Tapia won five championships in three weight classes, winning the WBA bantamweight title, the IBF and WBO junior bantamweight titles and the IBF featherweight belt.
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NEWS
May 6, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Paul Williams, 71, of Villas, N.J., who retired in 1989 as assistant fire chief at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, died of lung cancer Wednesday, April 30, at home. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Williams attended what is now West Catholic Preparatory High School but left to help support the family because his father died when he was very young, daughter Wendy Hueftle said. Mr. Williams served a four-year enlistment as an Air Force firefighter, and while stationed at a Royal Air Force base near Sculthorpe in Norfolk, England, he met and married his British wife, Wendy.
NEWS
April 11, 2013
Climate change could be bumpy LONDON - Tourists, exchange students, and business travelers: It's time to buckle up. More pollution is likely to mean bumpier flights for transatlantic travelers, researchers say, predicting increased turbulence over the North Atlantic as carbon dioxide levels rise. In a paper published Monday in the journal Nature Climate Change, University of East Anglia climate expert Manoj Joshi and colleague Paul Williams ran a climate simulation that cranked up the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to twice its pre-industrial level - roughly 50 percent more than now. Williams said they ran a series of turbulence-predicting algorithms for the North Atlantic winter period and compared the results with pre-industrial rates.
NEWS
April 3, 2013 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
WHAT A DIFFERENCE one song can make. Nobody knows that better than Billy Paul, the veteran Philadelphia jazz and R&B song stylist whose career soared to the stars in the early '70s with "Me and Mrs. Jones," his brilliantly nuanced portrayal from the cheatin' side of town. In "Am I Black Enough for You" - the brutally honest documentary about the man born Paul Williams and his wife, Blanche Williams - record mogul Clive Davis nails that superhit as "one of the most important performances and singles" of the hit-laden Philadelphia International Records catalog.
NEWS
September 8, 2012 | By John Timpane, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hal David's life was the spectacle of a hard thing done well, with grace. David completed his song in Los Angeles on Sept. 1, at 91. As a musician and lyric-writer, I grew up with his words, especially his celebrated work with Burt Bacharach. How easy the words rode - how twisty the musical rails. I asked a very accomplished songman, Paul Williams ("We've Only Just Begun" and much else), who is president and chairman of the board of the music company ASCAP, what he valued about his friend's lyrics.
SPORTS
May 30, 2012 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
JOHNNY TAPIA, the five-time boxing champion whose turbulent career was marked by cocaine addiction, alcohol, depression and run-ins with the law, was found dead Sunday at his home in Albuquerque, N.M. He was 45. Authorities were called to the house at about 7:45 p.m. on Sunday, spokesman Robert Gibbs said. The death didn't appear to be suspicious, he said. Tapia won five championships in three weight classes, winning the WBA bantamweight title, the IBF and WBO junior bantamweight titles and the IBF featherweight belt.
SPORTS
July 19, 2011
HEY, EVERYONE. Remember me? I haven't been around for about a month now, the result of vacation, obligatory furlough and, upon my return to these parts, a nasty kidney infection that landed me in the hospital. So, what's been happening in the world while I was far away or undergoing more testing than a laboratory rat? Well, there are always those two inevitabilities, death and taxes. Even as free-spending Congress debates ways to further pipeline our cash into the fast-emptying federal coffers, the 10-count was tolled for cherished trainer Bouie Fisher, former Boston Herald boxing writer George Kimball, former WBC super featherweight champion Genaro "Chicanito" Hernandez and respected ShoBox announcer Nick Charles, all of whom lost lengthy battles with cancer; Veteran Boxers Association Ring 1 member Jimmy Lowry; and local radio sports reporter Donna McQuillan Luongo.
SPORTS
November 22, 2010 | By BERNARD FERNANDEZ, fernanb@phillynews.com
ATLANTIC CITY - A physicist doing a scientific paper on the aerodynamics of baseball could lecture on the whys and wherefores of a 100-mph fastball. He no doubt would expound at length about such things as arm velocity, leg drive, body torque and release point. He'd also probably make the subject matter seem stupefyingly boring. Some things, like a Nolan Ryan heater buzzed under a hitter's chin, are better experienced than explained. And the same holds true of a truly spectacular knockout punch, the kind that can instantaneously separate the recipient from his senses.
SPORTS
May 2, 2008 | By BILL FLEISCHMAN For the Daily News
On her daily runs, Anne Mahlum would see the homeless men standing near the shelter at 13th and Vine streets. She and the homeless would wave to each other. One day last year, Mahlum had an idea: She would start a running club involving the homeless. She arranged a meeting with the shelter's director. "Nine guys were interested, so I found a way to get shoes and clothes donated," Mahlum said Wednesday. Mahlum, the founder and president of Back On My Feet, and about 30 BOMF members will run in Sunday's 29th annual 10-mile Blue Cross Broad Street Run. BOMF is a nonprofit organization that promotes self-sufficiency.
NEWS
October 21, 2003
ISN'T THERE AN infield fight rule in baseball? As in - what goes on in the field stays in the field? Guess not now that Boston police today are asking for assault and battery charges against Yankees pitcher Jeff Nelson and right fielder Karim Garcia for a bullpen fight with a Red Sox groundskeeper. Next to Chicago Cubs fan and foul ball fumbler Steve Bartman, Paul Williams, a Fenway groundskeeper, has become the most famous non-athlete to emerge from this fall's baseball classics.
SPORTS
September 29, 2002 | By Kristian Pope INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Late in Ocean City's football game yesterday against Atlantic City, Red Raiders coach Gary Degenhardt pulled a handkerchief from his pocket and slowly wiped his face. His players behind him, also feeling the heat, started to move nervously on the sideline. These were not signs of a team with a big lead late in the game. On the other sideline, however, things were just getting good for Atlantic City. Ocean City withstood a feverish, final five minutes to walk off the field at blustery Carey Stadium a 21-14 winner in the Cape-Atlantic League contest on a picturesque day near the boardwalk.
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