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Pavement

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1994 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Pavement's "Cut Your Hair," a scalding commentary on fledgling rock bands from the current Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain, contains one verse that sounds like a classified ad: "No big hair/Chops a must/Songs mean a lot. " It's a bit of mockery, but Saturday at the sold-out Trocadero, the rising stars of independent-label rock made at least part of it ring true: The songs did mean a lot. There were few guitar solos, and fewer moments of musical...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1997 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The famously moody Stephen Malkmus was in chipper spirits Saturday. And when the gangly guitarist decides to be charming, witty and engaged with his material, a Pavement show is something to behold. At the sold-out Trocadero, Malkmus stood stage left in plaid pants, kicking like a nerdy Rockette and addressing his own diffident nature with a mixture of ardor and ironic detachment. "I'm of several minds, I am the worst of my kind," he warbled on "Transport Is Arranged," just one of the brittle, melodically inventive rock songs from Pavement's fourth album, Brighten the Corners (Matador)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1997 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stephen Malkmus has a cold. It's a bright Manhattan morning, and the skinny, high-cheekboned auteur of the most brilliant and elusive American guitar band of the '90s is having a rough time of it. The previous evening's Pavement show at New York University did what few do anymore: It fell apart. Two-thirds through, as guitarist Scott "Spiral Stairs" Kannberg, bassist Mark Ibold, drummer Steve West and percussionist, keyboardist and screamer Bob Nastanovich waited to see where Malkmus was headed next, the singer and lead guitarist went into gridlock.
NEWS
July 30, 1986 | Inquirer photographs by Michael Viola
Give a fellow a skateboard, some pavement and a sense of balance and bravery, and there's virtually no end to the summertime fun he can create. Morgan Woods, 17, of Gloucester Township, performed acrobatics on his skateboard Monday amid the cooling spray of the fountain at JFK Plaza in Center City.
NEWS
September 20, 2010 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Plotting a pop-culture comeback is a perilous business. Other 1990s entities haven't done so well in 2010: the femme-fest Lilith Fair struggled mightily at the box office over the summer, and rap-rock knuckleheads Limp Bizkit canceled a reunion tour before it began. Pavement, however, timed its return perfectly. In its '90s heyday, the indie rock outfit led by guitarist, singer, and songwriter Stephen Malkmus (with assistance from Scott "Spiral Stairs" Kannberg) was a 1,000-ticket band.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2010 | By CHRIS RIEMENSCHNEIDER, Minneapolis Star Tribune
They were one of the more influential indie-rock bands back when the scenesters still called it "alternative," and two of their albums consistently rank in critical tallies on the best of the '90s. One thing Pavement never quite gained a reputation for, however, was being a solid live act. The quintet from Stockton, Calif., often left fans underwhelmed or even scratching their heads. Since the smart-alecky, slacker-ish rockers openly complained about touring and generally eschewed all things nostalgic and predictable, Pavement's 70-date reunion tour - coming to the Mann Center for the Performing Arts tonight with rising local star Kurt Vile as the opening act - stands out as quite an interesting and perhaps even questionable venture.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2001 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
For a while in the '80s and '90s, the American indie-rock world was slacker heaven. It was cool for bands not to care about the details of their music or their Cup-o-Noodles existence. The lazy few with the right blend of rumpled charm and negative ambition ruled a disenfranchised underground, and their primitivist aesthetic, derived from punk, spread like a virus: Those pursuing "cred" couldn't be bothered with growing up, much less anything so banal as getting better on their instruments.
NEWS
January 22, 1998 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For the last four years, the commercial district on King Street has been riding a wave of progress and prosperity. Boarded-up storefronts were replaced with quaint shops and a former milk-and-root-beer factory was turned into a design and retail center. The borough's financial health has increased dramatically with the influx of businesses and a rise in property values. Now Borough Council is putting the finishing touches on King Street, completing the revitalization begun a decade ago in the business district known as Olde Towne Malvern.
NEWS
April 1, 1997 | By Karen D. Brown, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Federal Aviation Administration will start today building a $21 million airport-pavement testing facility here to accommodate a new generation of jumbo-jets that are heavier than ever before, officials announced yesterday. The new center, the first full-scale pavement tester in the world, will help calculate the wear and tear on runways for the new planes, which could weigh more than one million pounds and will use complex landing gear, according to FAA spokesman Les Dorr. "Just like highways, runways wear out," Dorr said.
NEWS
March 13, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you are sick of dodging the axle-busting, tire-flattening potholes that seem to be everywhere, get over it - the craters are likely here until late spring, experts say. "We are fighting Mother Nature," said Leslie A. McCarthy, a Villanova University engineering professor whose research includes pavement design and construction. This year, pothole season began early, on Jan. 6, when temperatures in the region went from freezing into the 60s and back into the teens, according to state Department of Transportation spokesman Gene Blaum.
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NEWS
March 13, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you are sick of dodging the axle-busting, tire-flattening potholes that seem to be everywhere, get over it - the craters are likely here until late spring, experts say. "We are fighting Mother Nature," said Leslie A. McCarthy, a Villanova University engineering professor whose research includes pavement design and construction. This year, pothole season began early, on Jan. 6, when temperatures in the region went from freezing into the 60s and back into the teens, according to state Department of Transportation spokesman Gene Blaum.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | By Phillip Lucas and Daily News Staff Writer
THE POOPGATE SAGA in Southwest Center City continued Tuesday, as Thomas Van Der Grift continued waiting for Freedom Taxi to send a cleaning crew to pressure-wash the pavement where a cabbie was caught on surveillance video defecating beside his parked taxi early Friday morning. A camera recorded the cabbie at 5:08 a.m. on Bainbridge Street near 18th. A company representative said he was fired. The Philadelphia Parking Authority taxicab and limo division is considering whether his license to drive in Philly should be revoked.
NEWS
July 17, 2012 | By PHILLIP LUCAS, Daily News Staff Writer
A cabbie squatted outside his taxi and defecated onto the street in Southwest Center City Friday morning, and a homeowner who caught the incident on camera says all sorts of things have happened since β€” except what he's been asking for since he called the company and posted the surveillance footage on YouTube. "The only thing I've been asking since Friday is, β€˜Can somebody come clean this up?'" said Thomas Van Der Grift, who owns a rowhouse on Bainbridge Street near 18th. The pavement near his house was still spotted with brown smudges Monday evening.
NEWS
May 10, 2012 | Daily News Editorial
Today, the school district makes an announcement that β€” at least for a moment β€” allows it to transcend the current messy and complicated conversation about its plans to cope with fiscal and systemic crises, and makes a positive step toward the future. At the William Dick Elementary School in North Philadelphia, city and school bigwigs will announce a plan to replace acres of pavement with acres of green. The Dick School and the neighboring Hank Gathers Recreation Center will give the city more green space and its residents more room to breathe.
NEWS
August 8, 2011
A WARM, MUGGY day of campaigning nearly starts off badly. Karen Brown, the Republican nominee for mayor, is ready to leave her South Philly block when her righthand man, Rick Modglin, goes to dump a cup of lemonade on the street by the car. Don't do it, Brown warns. The drink will draw flies and then the ire of Gracie, the woman who keeps clean the block of tidy two-story rowhouses. Most of them have her campaign poster in their windows. All politics are local. Brown and a few volunteers in three cars head to Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, where the fifth annual SheROX Triathlon is under way. She spent the weekend buying all the rally towels she could find - about 1,000 - and having them printed with her name and campaign website.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2010 | By Rachel Gouk, Inquirer Staff Writer
Personal struggles propel some runners, others love the thrill of competition or view races as paths to self-discovery and accomplishment. This range of inspiration is what the 17th annual Philadelphia Marathon brings to town. This weekend, 23,000 athletes will participate in several races: 11,000 are expected in the marathon, 9,000 in the half marathon, and 3,000 in the Rothman Institute 8K. If you wanted to really stretch your legs for 26.2 miles, it's too late. The full marathon is closed to competitors, selling out every year since 2007.
NEWS
September 20, 2010 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Plotting a pop-culture comeback is a perilous business. Other 1990s entities haven't done so well in 2010: the femme-fest Lilith Fair struggled mightily at the box office over the summer, and rap-rock knuckleheads Limp Bizkit canceled a reunion tour before it began. Pavement, however, timed its return perfectly. In its '90s heyday, the indie rock outfit led by guitarist, singer, and songwriter Stephen Malkmus (with assistance from Scott "Spiral Stairs" Kannberg) was a 1,000-ticket band.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2010 | By CHRIS RIEMENSCHNEIDER, Minneapolis Star Tribune
They were one of the more influential indie-rock bands back when the scenesters still called it "alternative," and two of their albums consistently rank in critical tallies on the best of the '90s. One thing Pavement never quite gained a reputation for, however, was being a solid live act. The quintet from Stockton, Calif., often left fans underwhelmed or even scratching their heads. Since the smart-alecky, slacker-ish rockers openly complained about touring and generally eschewed all things nostalgic and predictable, Pavement's 70-date reunion tour - coming to the Mann Center for the Performing Arts tonight with rising local star Kurt Vile as the opening act - stands out as quite an interesting and perhaps even questionable venture.
NEWS
March 31, 2008 | By David Stampone FOR THE INQUIRER
"Ah-ooo!" Stephen Malkmus said back to the whooping, sold-out Fillmore at the TLA crowd Saturday night, two songs into his 85-minute set. "Phil-lay!" enthused the Jicks bandleader. "Filet mignon; Philadelphia mignon - that's what kind of steak this town is. " Still pegged from his days leading the defunct Pavement as "the slacker prince of 1990s indie rock" (as the New York Times called him Friday), Malkmus may still exhibit the winning nonchalance that likely prompted Courtney Love to dub him "the Grace Kelly" of same last decade - but the Stockton, Calif.
NEWS
November 9, 2006 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The worn-out soles of newly elected Democrat Patrick Murphy's shoes told the story of his surprising victory in an Eighth Congressional District race that was too close to call election night. Showing reporters the holes in the shoes he has worn since he launched his campaign more than a year ago, Murphy, a 33-year-old political newcomer, said yesterday that it was old-fashioned, door-to-door stumping that enabled him to clinch a key seat for his party. "We knocked on 160,000 doors on Election Day alone," he said of himself and volunteers who canvassed the district, which includes all of Bucks and slivers of Montgomery County and Philadelphia.
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