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ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK: THE LIFE & TIMES OF KATRINA GILBERT. 9 tonight, HBO.   YOU'D PROBABLY count yourself lucky to have someone like Katrina Gilbert taking care of a person you love. A certified nursing assistant who spends her days - sometimes as many as eight in a row - lifting, feeding, cleaning and otherwise caring for the residents of a Tennessee convalescent home, Gilbert actually seems willing to listen to those who no longer get much of a hearing from anyone else.
NEWS
June 20, 1986 | By BOB WARNER, Daily News Staff Writer
Two of the city's top financial officers are going into court in a dispute over the city controller's auditing powers, and taxpayers will pay the legal bills. City computer czar Eugene L. Cliett Jr. filed suit in Common Pleas Court this week to try to get his last paycheck released from the clutches of city Controller Joseph C. Vignola. Vignola put Cliett's $1,333 biweekly paycheck into his office safe two weeks ago in retaliation for Cliett's refusal to open financial records of the Philadelphia Computing Corp.
NEWS
April 1, 1986 | By TYREE JOHNSON, Daily News Staff Writer
As long as mum's the word from Sheriff Ralph C. Passio III, there will be no paycheck Friday for his $26,500-a-year inspector, William Schwartz. Yesterday, City Controller Joseph C. Vignola said he was withholding Schwartz's biweekly paycheck until Passio tells him what the 10-year veteran of the sheriff's office has been doing lately to earn his city salary. Passio relieved Schwartz of all his duties March 12, after the FBI told the sheriff it had found that his department paid two private auto repair shops for work that was never done on 20 cars.
SPORTS
March 4, 1992 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Well, as Bobby Bonilla always said, if you don't like the highest-paid player in baseball, just wait a few days. It will change. Only 94 days ago, it was Bonilla whose Mets contract (five years, $29.5 million) was supposed to be threatening the very survival of baseball, if not the entire universe. Now it is Ryne Sandberg who has taken over Bonilla's title as owner of baseball's most outrageous paycheck. Now it is Sandberg who has gotten the contract - a new four-year, $28.4 million extension from the Cubs - that's most guaranteed to cause baseball commissioner Fay Vincent to predict the end of the world.
NEWS
August 30, 1989 | By William J. Beerman, Special to The Inquirer
Thursday is payday - normally a day to look forward to - for about 5,000 South Jersey employees of the General Electric Co.'s Aerospace Division. But since January, payday has not always been a happy day, some employees say. Rather, a rash of payroll mistakes has made it a day of frustration, heartburn and headaches. The former RCA Corp., including its South Jersey Aerospace Division facilities in Moorestown and Gibbsboro, merged with GE in June of 1986, and in January, GE began integrating the largely manual RCA payroll system into GE's computerized system.
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | By Judy Baehr, Special to The Inquirer
John Warner didn't set out to be a cop. The 34-year-old Oaklyn resident had every intention of pursuing a career in automobile retailing after graduating from Peirce Junior College in 1975. But when he opened up a health club in Oaklyn in the early 1980s, the officers who came in as customers persuaded him to apply for a position on the local police force. "I was absolutely thrilled when they hired me," he said. " 'To protect and to serve' in my own home town - I was so proud.
NEWS
July 18, 2010
Andrew Celwyn is co-owner of the Herbiary in Reading Terminal Market and Chestnut Hill With so much bad news about Philadelphia's budget woes, increased property taxes, and decrease of services, I was surprised that no one took notice of the good news that recently came out of City Hall. Granted, there was no news release by Mayor Nutter's office and I didn't hear any Council members crowing about it either, but not to worry. I'll let you in on this closely guarded secret. My wife and I jointly own a small business in Philadelphia, and as the bookkeeper, I need to keep track of what City Hall is doing.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2002 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
It's called Time Out, but French director Laurent Cantet's unsettling film about a businessman between situations might well be called "Fake This Job and Love It. " Vincent (Aur?lien Recoing) resembles both Prince Albert of Monaco and a corporate executive. But he is a sham. Recently fired and too ashamed to admit it, Vincent constructs an alternative universe. To impress friends and family, he says he is a U.N. consultant in Geneva. He works harder to get the job description and language down than he would if he were actually employed.
NEWS
June 6, 1986 | By Russell Cooke, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thousands of paychecks will be distributed to most municipal employees today, but a $1,333.90 check payable to city data-processing chief Eugene L. Cliett Jr. will remain locked in a drawer somewhere in the city controller's office. Controller Joseph C. Vignola yesterday ordered that Cliett's pay be withheld because of what Vignola contends is Cliett's refusal to cooperate with an audit of his department, the Office of Information Management (OIM). Cliett, who is a $55,000-a-year deputy finance director, last week turned away a consultant hired by Vignola to audit OIM. He notified Vignola that by law the controller's staff - and not a consultant - must conduct all audits.
NEWS
March 21, 1988 | By GLORIA CAMPISI and JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writers
The mother of William Gilliard III told him his night job selling children's books over the phone wouldn't amount to much. She'd tried it herself and hadn't made much money. Gilliard listened for two weeks and went to work every day. Then, on Thursday he brought home his answer: a two-week paycheck for $15,343.40. Net. "I thought it was one hell of a cash incentive," said the 18-year-old graduate of Martin Luther King High School, who signed up with the phone- soliciting company, Incentive Cash Telemarketing, in Horsham.
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NEWS
October 16, 2015 | By Chris Palmer and Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - In a vote that largely followed party lines, the state Senate on Wednesday passed a bill that would prohibit public-sector unions from using employee paycheck deductions to fund certain political activities. Sen. John Eichelberger Jr. (R., Blair), the sponsor of the so-called paycheck protection legislation, called it a "major victory" for union workers. "It protects members from being forced through the union to fund political candidates or causes they don't support," he said.
NEWS
August 29, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chester Upland teachers and support staff voted Thursday to keep working despite learning that the district might not have money to pay them next month. Two days after a Delaware County judge rejected a new financial recovery plan submitted by Chester Upland and state officials, its 223 teachers and support staff were told the district could not make its Sept. 9 payroll. Michele Paulick, president of the Chester Upland Education Association, which represents the teachers, called the announcement from Superintendent Gregory Shannon and receiver Francis Barnes "horrible news.
NEWS
July 31, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
During his years as Ed Rendell's deputy mayor, Herbert Vederman refused to collect a city paycheck, living instead off the millions he made from his family's retail clothing empire. But recently, federal prosecutors say, he benefited from his government connections in other ways - by funneling cash to U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah in return for official favors from the Philadelphia Democratic congressman. Prosecutors said Wednesday that Fattah pressed tirelessly to get Vederman a federal post, going so far as to hand-deliver a letter to President Obama in fall 2010 asking him to make Vederman a U.S. ambassador.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2015 | Solomon Jones
I LOOKED at my 10-year-old son about a week ago and something around his mouth looked almost . . . dirty. "What have you been eating?" I asked, figuring that the shadow on his upper lip was the remnants of a meal. "Nothing," he said. "Then what's that on your face?" He shrugged. I moved in for a closer look. Turning his face slightly toward the light filtering in through the living room window, I saw it. "Is that a mustache?" I asked in disbelief. My wife, LaVeta, who was hovering nearby, came over for a gander.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK: THE LIFE & TIMES OF KATRINA GILBERT. 9 tonight, HBO.   YOU'D PROBABLY count yourself lucky to have someone like Katrina Gilbert taking care of a person you love. A certified nursing assistant who spends her days - sometimes as many as eight in a row - lifting, feeding, cleaning and otherwise caring for the residents of a Tennessee convalescent home, Gilbert actually seems willing to listen to those who no longer get much of a hearing from anyone else.
NEWS
December 4, 2013 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
PEOPLE, IT'S OVER. Last week, fittingly on the day before Thanksgiving, a group of ex-cons who've waited nearly 10 years for a paycheck finally got it. I don't mean a promise of a paycheck or a hearing that might, maybe, lead to a paycheck. (Sadly, I fell for all of those . . . ) I mean actual checks that turned into real money that paid for stuff like overdue rent and electric bills and turkeys and Christmas gifts that some workers said they wouldn't have been able to afford otherwise.
NEWS
October 18, 2013
FURLOUGHED FEDERAL workers have been promised that they will be paid for time lost during the government shutdown. Even so, let me offer some advice to those people with jobs they thought were secure. Do what you can, as soon as you can, to create an emergency fund. Make it a priority. Yes, you've heard this before. Yet here we are again, and workers across the country, including nonfederal employees and government contractors whose incomes were also affected by the shutdown, are feeling the financial pain after missing one paycheck or getting just a partial paycheck.
NEWS
September 22, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA City Controller Alan Butkovitz threatened Friday to hold up paychecks in the city's Department of Licenses and Inspections if it doesn't speed up cooperation with his probe into how the city regulates demolition projects. Mayor Nutter's chief of staff, Everett Gillison, said the administration had been cooperating and accused Butkovitz of abusing his authority. "If he really wants to know how L&I works, our people are there to help him with that," Gillison said. "I think this is a case where Mr. Butkovitz is playing politics.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | Cpompiled by The Inquirer Staff
Once upon a time, there was a time before Wi-Fi - or even the Net. They did have TVs back then. Even sitcoms. And sitcom stars. Robin Williams , 62, was a TV star way back then, when there was no Internet. This fall, he'll return to network TV in David E. Kelley 's The Crazy Ones on CBS. It's been so long, the Mork and Mindy alumnus says, "the last time I was on TV, wired meant a gram and a bottle of Jack Daniel's. " (Williams famously battled substance abuse problems back then, in the olden times.)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013
SEVERAL years ago, I wrote about health care in Japan, where the government had begun charging corporations for their overweight employees. The Japanese tackle diabetes, high blood pressure, cancer and heart disease with a tape measure first: A waist circumference greater than 33.5 inches for women and 35.5 inches for men is enough to trigger a fine for an employer. My readers scoffed at this strategy, reacting with laughter and a lot of eye-rolling. Fast-forward to today. With health-care costs soaring in the United States, many companies have started to penalize overweight employees.
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