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Paycheck

NEWS
January 27, 2008 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amy Dilzer, a 25-year-old sales consultant at the chic Joan Shepp boutique on Walnut Street, is not a rich woman. But recently she was tempted by a pair of Christian Louboutin graffiti-print wedges that retail for $595. Even with a generous employee discount, the shoes would cost her dearly. Yes, the national economy is staggering from the subprime-mortgage sucker punch. True, we're on the brink of recession. And, sure, the federal deficit lumbers across the horizon like some slobbering metropolis-eater out of a 1950s Japanese sci-fi film.
NEWS
January 17, 2008 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Nutter's call for "the best and the brightest" came with a cost: Three of his top hires are earning from 15 percent to 23 percent more than their predecessors. Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey, for instance, is being paid $195,000 a year. That's 23 percent more than the $158,538 paid to Sylvester Johnson. It's also a jump from the $175,000 salary Ramsey earned in Washington, where he was police chief for nine years. New City Managing Director Camille Barnett, who has managed governments in Dallas, Houston, Washington and elsewhere, likewise will be paid $195,000 - 15 percent more than the $169,062 earned by her predecessor, Loree Jones.
NEWS
December 19, 2007 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Baillie retired from his $228,826-a-year job as the Chester County Intermediate Unit's executive director in January with an annual pension of $163,289. But he didn't leave until six months later, after receiving almost $80,000 in pension payments along with his salary. Barbara Burke-Stevenson retired as superintendent of Bucks County's New Hope-Solebury School District on Aug. 1, 2006, with an annual pension of $80,802. She stayed for another year, collecting retirement payments while getting a salary of $155,000.
NEWS
November 7, 2006 | By STEPHAN ROSENFELD
WHEN IT comes to college football, Pennsylvania is neither a red nor a blue state. It's blue and white, and the official flag-bearer is Joe Paterno. JoePa, after more than half a century at Penn State, and 40 years as head coach, usually charges, fists clenched, arms pumping, onto the field at the start of each game (a tradition that'll be tough to continue in Saturday's Temple game since he broke his leg in a sideline scrum in Wisconsin). It still gives me chills more than 30 years after graduating from Happy Valley.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2006 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Health insurance premiums have risen faster than wages in Pennsylvania over the last six years, according to a report released yesterday by Families USA, a nonprofit Washington consumer group that advocates for affordable health care. But Rose Fasciocco, who runs the books for her husband's plumbing business in Springfield Township, Delaware County, doesn't need a report to tell her that. "We used to cover our employees 100 percent," she said. "We wanted to set ourselves apart that way. But when we got our last increase, we had to start asking for a contribution.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2006 | By Steve Goldstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In 1990, when Louise Carpenter retired as a teacher at St. Andrew School in Newtown, Bucks County, she offered to continue as a volunteer. Her offer was rebuffed by officials, who rehired her as a full-time aide. Carpenter, 91, yesterday was named Pennsylvania's outstanding older worker, an honor that left her shocked, pleased, and determined to keep working. "I make no bones about being old," she said after bypassing a news conference to take a tour of the White House.
NEWS
September 1, 2006
SHAME on the Daily News and the school district for trivializing a plan by the district to dock the pay of every 10-month employee, saying it will only cost the "average teacher" $22.77 in take-home pay each week. The issue is not how much money any employee loses - although at least we are sensitive to the fact that for many working families today sacrificing anywhere from $14 to $134 in take-home pay unnecessarily will cause hardships. The issue is treating employees fairly.
NEWS
September 1, 2006 | By Wendy Ruderman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
J.R. Powell is a busy man. He works as a municipal judge in 11 South Jersey towns, earning nearly $187,000. The Pitman lawyer now has a new distinction: The person in New Jersey with the most taxpayer-funded jobs - but he is hardly the highest paid, according to a list released yesterday by the state Division of Pensions and Benefits. The list of the state's top 50 highest-paid multiple government jobholders was requested last week by a joint legislative panel exploring ways to cut property taxes by changing public employee benefits, particularly pensions.
NEWS
March 26, 2006
Philadelphia taxpayers are still paying the salary of Councilman Rick Mariano, even though he sat in jail last week after a jury convicted him of taking bribes. A sizable majority of City Council sees no problem with this. A sizable majority of this region thinks City Council has lost its mind. How can Council let a disgraced colleague convicted of selling out the public trust keep pocketing a city paycheck until he is sentenced in federal court on July 6? Mariano won't resign, and his old pals on Council are too gutless to expel him. Poor Rick, his colleagues say. How will he get by without a paycheck?
SPORTS
February 27, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
Michelle Wie returns to high school today with $73,227 from her first LPGA paycheck and a diamond-encrusted watch from her latest endorsement deal. The 16-year-old junior at Punahou School was particularly enamored with the Omega watch she was given before the final round Saturday at the Fields Open in Kapolei, Hawaii, where she dazzled a hometown gallery with seven birdies in a round of 66 that left her one shot out of a playoff. Starting the final round of the 54-hole tournament six shots behind, Wie pulled into a tie for the lead with a birdie on the 17th hole before missing an 18-foot birdie on the last hole and finishing at 13-under 203. Meena Lee birdied the 18th hole to finish at 14-under 202, and Seon Hwa Lee birdied the 14th and finished with no mistakes to join the playoff.
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