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BUSINESS
October 19, 2006 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Health insurance premiums have risen faster than wages in Pennsylvania over the last six years, according to a report released yesterday by Families USA, a nonprofit Washington consumer group that advocates for affordable health care. But Rose Fasciocco, who runs the books for her husband's plumbing business in Springfield Township, Delaware County, doesn't need a report to tell her that. "We used to cover our employees 100 percent," she said. "We wanted to set ourselves apart that way. But when we got our last increase, we had to start asking for a contribution.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2006 | By Steve Goldstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In 1990, when Louise Carpenter retired as a teacher at St. Andrew School in Newtown, Bucks County, she offered to continue as a volunteer. Her offer was rebuffed by officials, who rehired her as a full-time aide. Carpenter, 91, yesterday was named Pennsylvania's outstanding older worker, an honor that left her shocked, pleased, and determined to keep working. "I make no bones about being old," she said after bypassing a news conference to take a tour of the White House.
NEWS
September 1, 2006
SHAME on the Daily News and the school district for trivializing a plan by the district to dock the pay of every 10-month employee, saying it will only cost the "average teacher" $22.77 in take-home pay each week. The issue is not how much money any employee loses - although at least we are sensitive to the fact that for many working families today sacrificing anywhere from $14 to $134 in take-home pay unnecessarily will cause hardships. The issue is treating employees fairly.
NEWS
September 1, 2006 | By Wendy Ruderman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
J.R. Powell is a busy man. He works as a municipal judge in 11 South Jersey towns, earning nearly $187,000. The Pitman lawyer now has a new distinction: The person in New Jersey with the most taxpayer-funded jobs - but he is hardly the highest paid, according to a list released yesterday by the state Division of Pensions and Benefits. The list of the state's top 50 highest-paid multiple government jobholders was requested last week by a joint legislative panel exploring ways to cut property taxes by changing public employee benefits, particularly pensions.
NEWS
March 26, 2006
Philadelphia taxpayers are still paying the salary of Councilman Rick Mariano, even though he sat in jail last week after a jury convicted him of taking bribes. A sizable majority of City Council sees no problem with this. A sizable majority of this region thinks City Council has lost its mind. How can Council let a disgraced colleague convicted of selling out the public trust keep pocketing a city paycheck until he is sentenced in federal court on July 6? Mariano won't resign, and his old pals on Council are too gutless to expel him. Poor Rick, his colleagues say. How will he get by without a paycheck?
SPORTS
February 27, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
Michelle Wie returns to high school today with $73,227 from her first LPGA paycheck and a diamond-encrusted watch from her latest endorsement deal. The 16-year-old junior at Punahou School was particularly enamored with the Omega watch she was given before the final round Saturday at the Fields Open in Kapolei, Hawaii, where she dazzled a hometown gallery with seven birdies in a round of 66 that left her one shot out of a playoff. Starting the final round of the 54-hole tournament six shots behind, Wie pulled into a tie for the lead with a birdie on the 17th hole before missing an 18-foot birdie on the last hole and finishing at 13-under 203. Meena Lee birdied the 18th hole to finish at 14-under 202, and Seon Hwa Lee birdied the 14th and finished with no mistakes to join the playoff.
NEWS
February 20, 2006 | By Judy Harch
One more venerable institution, Strawbridge's, is about to disappear. It will take with it a chunk of my history. The name Strawbridge's conjures up sweet memories of the days I stood at the brink of adulthood. In early 1964, I was all of 19 years old. I had a great job as a secretary at a large corporation in Pennsauken and was about to embark on a career (when it was considered a career) as a new wife. My fiance was in the Navy, stationed in Charleston, S.C. I had nothing to do in the evenings or on weekends, so I took a part-time job at Strawbridge & Clothier in the almost new Cherry Hill Mall.
NEWS
August 30, 2005 | By Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Faced with a projected $9 million budget deficit, the Willingboro school board last night voted to eliminate 11 jobs, lay off 16 employees, and cut 22 other positions not included in the current budget. By a 5-3 vote, the board approved the cuts recommended by interim Superintendent Melindo Persi. The positions that would be cut or affected were not immediately identified. Persi said he plans to meet with the affected employees today. The cuts would save about $1.4 million, Persi said.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2005 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Business was booming last year at Toll Bros. Inc., and chief executive officer Robert I. Toll was well-rewarded for that success. The Horsham-based home builder's revenue and net income soared, and so did its stock price. And Robert Toll's total compensation - $44 million, more than double his take in 2003 - was the highest among executives of local companies, according to data compiled for The Inquirer by Equilar Inc. It was not quite as good a year at Merck & Co. Inc. Net income at the pharmaceutical firm that employs 12,000 in Montgomery County was down 15 percent, and the company's stock price fell 30 percent amid withdrawal from the market of the blockbuster pain medicine Vioxx.
NEWS
April 21, 2005
DOES anybody care about the little guy? The guy who's just getting by, paycheck to paycheck, trying to make ends meet? I don't think so. He's paying higher prices for cars, appliances and other necessities. Huge amounts of interest on a variety of loans, including his mortgage. I'm sure predatory-lender lobbyists are at this very moment pushing a bill making pay-day lending in Philadelphia legal at an annual rate of 450 percent and higher! Some even as high as 900 percent.
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