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Payne Stewart

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SPORTS
June 11, 2000 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It promises to be one of the best U.S. Opens ever, yet one of the saddest. As the best golfers in the world converge next week on Pebble Beach, Calif., for the 100th playing of the nation's ultimate golf championship, the joyous images of Payne Stewart's victory a year ago at Pinehurst and the sad reminders of his untimely death will hang in the air just as sure and thick as the morning mist over Monterey Peninsula. That's the sad part - that Stewart, the world-class champion and born-again Christian killed last October in a plane crash - is unable to defend his title, unable to bask in the glory of his accomplishment, unable to live out a life full of golf, family, friends and faith.
SPORTS
May 7, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Payne Stewart fought off an early challenge from Greg Norman and a late one from Lanny Wadkins to shoot a 3-under-par 67 yesterday and win the $1 million Byron Nelson Golf Classic by 2 shots. Stewart, the PGA champion, finished with an 8-under 202 in the tournament, which was shortened to three days and 54 holes by rain and floods early in the week at the TPC-Las Colinas course. Stewart's victory was his second in three starts and the seventh of his career. The $180,000 first prize lifted his career earnings to more than $4.1 million, making him the seventh player to surpass the $4 million mark.
SPORTS
June 12, 2014 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Staff Writer
PINEHURST, N.C. - This Open is haunted. Perhaps 9 years ago, the last time Pinehurst No. 2 hosted the U.S. Open, it was too soon for any manifestation to have set in. There was plenty written and spoken in 2005 about Payne Stewart's death in a plane crash in 1999, but the atmosphere was not so . . . sad. Perhaps Stewart's soul was still adrift in some limbo, measuring its options before making its play. Certainly, the sense of loss and mortality did not descend on this Southern resort the way it has this week.
SPORTS
June 12, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
PINEHURST, N.C. - They were two players who would go on to become major champions and best buddies. But back in the early 1980s, Paul Azinger didn't know what to think when he met Payne Stewart. "I had a hard time liking him at first," Azinger said Tuesday. Stewart's brashness would subside over time. He matured into a gracious competitor and a fine family man who became an admired figure after he won the 1999 U.S. Open at Pinehurst Resort and Country Club, a victory that happened a little more than four months before he died in a plane crash.
SPORTS
June 15, 2000 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
They gathered at dawn, on one of golf's grandest cathedrals, to pay tribute to a man's life, to what he gave and all he left behind. There were family, friends, peers, fans. . .and the media, which rarely gets up that early unless it involves a tee time or a 50 percent sale at the merchandise tent. But yesterday they arose as one, several thousand strong, to bid one final farewell. Eight months after Payne Stewart and five others perished in a chartered plane crash and 24 hours before the start of the 100th U.S. Open, they came to celebrate the reigning champion, not mourn his absence.
SPORTS
June 21, 1993 | By Michael Bamberger, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A chip falls in, a putt stays out, a U.S. Open winner is determined. Lee MacLeod Janzen, winner of the 1992 Northern Telecom Open, winner of the 1993 Phoenix Open, has now won a championship that matters. Yesterday afternoon at the Baltusrol Golf Club, young Janzen, who is 28, had a lead of one lone stroke over his playing partner, Payne Stewart, as they went to the 16th hole, a 216-yard par-3 with a two-tiered green protected by bunkers and grassy knolls. There were no golfers behind them, and the golfers in front of them needed minor miracles to get in genuine contention.
SPORTS
March 1, 1998 | By Joe Juliano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The list of players invited to the by-invitation-only Masters tournament, the year's first major golf championship, usually occasions great scrutiny. Has the Augusta National Golf Club included all the worthies? Did it leave out anyone important? Unless you're a big fan of garish plus fours or rainbow-colored hats, the selection committee appeared to get it right for the 1998 tournament, which begins April 9 in Augusta, Ga. One player left out is Payne Stewart. With one exception, Stewart, who wears loose sports knickers in the colors of NFL teams, is the player with the highest finish on the 1997 money list who didn't get in. Stewart finished 40th, one notch below Kirk Triplett.
NEWS
October 26, 1999 | INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
A Learjet carrying golfer Payne Stewart and at least four others streaked uncontrolled for 1,400 miles across the country yesterday, its occupants apparently unconscious or dead, before it plunged nose-first into a field near this South Dakota town. No one on the ground was hurt, and there were no survivors aboard the aircraft, which came down about 1:20 p.m. Philadelphia time in a marshy area about two miles southwest of here. The cause of the uncontrolled flight that ended when the Learjet 35 apparently ran out of fuel was not known.
SPORTS
June 14, 1996 | By Joe Juliano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Woody Austin took the long and winding road just to get to his first round in the U.S. Open. He worked as a bank teller. He rehabilitated his knee for 18 months after a serious injury, an injury he first suffered as a child. He played golf all over the world, from Japan to the Dakotas. He then made the Nike tour and earned his PGA tour card for the first time last year, at the relatively advanced age of 31. Yesterday, Austin turned his first Open round into a coming-out party, firing a near-faultless 3-under-par 67 to tie Payne Stewart for the 18-hole lead on the squishy South course at Oakland Hills Country Club.
SPORTS
June 15, 1996 | By Joe Juliano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Payne Stewart didn't want to do it. He didn't want to yank his approach shots at 16 and 18 into the weeds at Oakland Hills Country Club and battle for bogeys to finish his second round of the U.S. Open yesterday. But look at the friends he made. On a sparkling, immaculate day for playing golf, Stewart managed to hang on despite his slip down the stretch for a 1-stroke lead at the halfway point of the 96th Open, carding a 1-over-par 71 for a 36-hole score of 2-under 138. However, two bogeys on the final three holes made Stewart a popular guy in the clubhouse, not only among the contenders who would love to leave this Detroit suburb with the silver championship trophy, but also among the folks who were dying to play two more rounds over this brutally tough layout.
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SPORTS
June 17, 2016 | By Mike Kern, Staff Writer
OAKMONT, Pa. - Among his record 82 PGA Tour victories, Sam Snead won seven majors. None of them happened to be a U.S. Open, in which he finished second four times. In 1947 he missed a 30-inch putt on the last hole of a playoff against Lew Worsham to lose by one. In 1939 at Philadelphia Cricket Club he took a triple-bogey 8 on the final hole when a par would have won and a bogey would have put him into a four-way playoff. Arnold Palmer won seven majors but not a PGA Championship.
SPORTS
June 17, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
PINEHURST, N.C. - All one needs to know about Erik Compton, a two-time heart transplant recipient, could be found Sunday by his play on the 18th hole at the U.S. Open after Martin Kaymer already had cemented the victory. "I hit the world's worst shot in to the green and got up and down" for par, Compton said after tying for second place with Rickie Fowler in only his second Open appearance. "You can't ever give up. We all have adversity in our lives. Some are different than others, some are more major.
SPORTS
June 14, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
PINEHURST, N.C. - Phil Mickelson continues to tinker with his game to figure out a way to finally break through for a U.S. Open victory after finishing in second place on six occasions. Mickelson brought the "claw" putter grip - with the left hand pushing and guiding the stroke through - into the competition but still needed 31 putts in a round of even-par 70 that left him 5 shots out of the lead after the opening 18 holes at Pinehurst No. 2. Mickelson called his putter "the one club that is hurting me. " He said the claw grip, which he insists is not long-term, helps him with alignment.
NEWS
June 12, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
PINEHURST, N.C. - The most recent recollection of Phil Mickelson in the U.S. Open came on a Sunday evening last year at Merion Golf Club where he dashed out of the valley in front of the 18th green to see if his 35-yard pitch shot had gone in the hole. The ball rolled past the cup. Mickelson's shoulders slumped and his head dropped. The missed shot meant that he would finish second for the sixth time, prompting him to say, "I just keep feeling heartbreak" after this Open had ended.
SPORTS
June 12, 2014 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Staff Writer
PINEHURST, N.C. - This Open is haunted. Perhaps 9 years ago, the last time Pinehurst No. 2 hosted the U.S. Open, it was too soon for any manifestation to have set in. There was plenty written and spoken in 2005 about Payne Stewart's death in a plane crash in 1999, but the atmosphere was not so . . . sad. Perhaps Stewart's soul was still adrift in some limbo, measuring its options before making its play. Certainly, the sense of loss and mortality did not descend on this Southern resort the way it has this week.
SPORTS
June 12, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
PINEHURST, N.C. - They were two players who would go on to become major champions and best buddies. But back in the early 1980s, Paul Azinger didn't know what to think when he met Payne Stewart. "I had a hard time liking him at first," Azinger said Tuesday. Stewart's brashness would subside over time. He matured into a gracious competitor and a fine family man who became an admired figure after he won the 1999 U.S. Open at Pinehurst Resort and Country Club, a victory that happened a little more than four months before he died in a plane crash.
SPORTS
June 11, 2014 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
HAS IT really been 15 years since the U.S. Open was first held at historic Pinehurst No. 2 in the sand-hills region of North Carolina, and Payne Stewart gave us one of the more memorable endings to any major by rolling in a 15-foot par putt on the final hole to beat Phil Mickelson by one? A sculpture and plaque commemorating his victorious fist-pump pose is displayed on the Walk of Fame that sits between the clubhouse and 18th green, a constant keepsake of what's been called that "One Moment in Time.
SPORTS
July 18, 2013
DID YOU KNOW? * Eleven of the previous 13 majors have been won by players who had never won one before. * Eighteen of the previous 19 majors have been won by different guys. The only one with two in that span is Rory McIlroy. * Non-Americans have won the previous four majors. * The record for low score at the British Open is 267, by Greg Norman in 1993 at Royal St. George's. * Eight players have shot 63 in this major: Mark Hayes (1977, Turnberry), Isao Aoki (1980, Muirfield)
SPORTS
June 14, 2013 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Columnist
SEVEN POUNDS, 4 ounces. That is what Amanda Brynn Mickelson weighed on the day she was born, June 21, 1999. It was the day after the U.S. Open ended, the one at Pinehurst where her father finished second to Payne Stewart, the first of his five second-place finishes at the event. Phil Mickelson carried a beeper that week and told anyone who would listen that he was leaving if his wife went into labor - in the lead, out of contention, mid-round, mid-hole, whatever. "It's not even a decision," is what Phil said, again and again, even if no one seemed quite ready to believe him. Phil had a deal with his wife, Amy, that she would page him with a special code if she went into labor.
SPORTS
May 19, 2002 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Matt Lees tees up another golf ball on the green mat and unleashes a smooth, flowing swing that concludes with a beautiful, high finish. The ball heads down the range with a slight draw and lands about 200 yards away, a normal drive for this 14-year-old. Before he hits another ball, he adjusts what appears to be a lefthanded golf glove. But it's not a glove. It's a sleeve that reaches midway up his left forearm. He has no left hand. No big deal, he says. "I like to feel like I'm not different from anyone else," Lees said.
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