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SPORTS
December 11, 1990 | By Alex Rosen, Special to The Inquirer
Duane Fisher of Gloucester Township, who a few years ago electrified the bowling world with a four-game 1,104, including back-to-back 300s and a 299, recently celebrated his decision to leave the Professonal Bowlers Association tour as a full-time participant by winning a tournament in Taylor, Mich. Fisher, one of the finest bowlers in the area and a touring pro for many years, upset leading qualifier Jess Staybrook of San Diego, 248-234, for the $150,000 Budweiser Touring Players Championship.
SPORTS
November 11, 2003 | By Don McKee INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shuttle buses moving eager fans from distant parking lots. A celebrity-spiced crowd signing autographs. The Phillie Phanatic cavorting with spectators to incessant rock music. And corporate sponsors paying for the right to get close to the action. The NBA All-Star Game? The World Series? The Republican National Convention? No. The PBA Tour's Greater Philadelphia Open is in town. Actually, it's at Sproul Lanes in Springfield, Delaware County, where autograph seekers can rub elbows with Phlex - the Phantoms' superhero mascot - and guys who spice their conversation with references to oil. Casual fans may think that men in open-necked shirts who worry about the quality of oil must work in the pit crew at NASCAR events.
NEWS
April 1, 2010 | By Lou Rabito INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bill O'Neill started bowling when he was 5, maybe younger. He used to go to the old Fairlanes in Fairless Hills with his "grandpop," and attended his father's league matches at Jubilee Lanes in Levittown. He watched PBA Tour events on television, and followed Pete Weber and Amleto Monacelli. Two decades later, Weber and Monacelli are still part of the tour, sitting in the top third of the player-of-the year standings. And O'Neill? Here's looking up at you, kid. The 28-year-old Bucks County resident, born two years after Weber joined the pro tour, is tied for the lead in the player-of-the-year race with one tournament remaining.
SPORTS
November 15, 2003 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Eric Forkel of Las Vegas led qualifying with a 4,134, 18-game pinfall last night in the PBA Greater Philadelphia Open at Sproul Lanes in Springfield. Forkel used a 279 high game and shot above 224 in every game until he closed out his evening with a 170 mark. He had been tied for 31st coming into the second round of qualifying. The round of 64 was pushed back to 5 p.m. due to Thursday night's high wind, which caused a power outage in Delaware County. The second group of initial qualifying had to finish its first nine games yesterday.
SPORTS
March 21, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Liz Johnson made bowling history yesterday afternoon, but she still was disappointed. Johnson, 30, of Cheektowaga, N.Y., became the first woman to advance to the championship match of a Professional Bowlers Association tour event, but she lost by 27 pins to Tommy Jones in the final of the PBA Banquet Open at Spectrum Lanes in Wyoming, Mich. Johnson spent eight seasons on the Professional Women's Bowling Association tour, winning 11 events including the 1996 U.S. Open as a rookie and earning more than $500,000.
SPORTS
September 19, 1989 | By Alex Rosen, Special to The Inquirer
Gene Carter Jr. of Glen Mills is one guy who can't wait to see his summer vacation come to an end. Carter is waiting for the start of the fall Professional Bowlers Association tour, which will begin early next month. He competed in nine events on the summer PBA tour, cashing paychecks in five of them. In the prestigious Miller Lite Challenge in Tucson, Ariz., in July, he finished a very respectable 29th. Carter, 24, also won his first PBA-sponsored event, the Eastern Regionals, in August at the Maple Lanes in Pennsauken.
SPORTS
May 11, 2010 | By NICK HOLLENSTEIN, hollenn@phillynews.com
It takes years of dedication to become a successful professional athlete. But determination paid off for Bill O'Neill, 28, of Southampton, Pa. In his fifth year on the PBA Tour, O'Neill is finally a winner in a major way. An All-America in college, he was the PBA's top rookie and had one of the best averages on the tour in his fourth season. The sport has been with him since he was 5 years old. O'Neill just followed his elders' example. "My whole family bowled," O'Neill said.
SPORTS
September 23, 1986 | By Alex Rosen, Special to The Inquirer
Area bowling professionals who say distance is a deterrent to competing in many tournaments will welcome the news: The Professional Bowlers Association tour is coming to the area for the $150,000 Atlantic City Open, which will be held April 6 through 11. "I just can't wait," said Sam Maccarone of Glassboro, the area's only full-time touring pro. Maccarone, who finished fourth in the Tucson Open this summer and third three years ago in...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1987 | By Don Russell, Special to The Inquirer
The problem with bowling's image as a sport, says Carmen Salvino, a member of the Professional Bowlers Association Hall of Fame, is that "everybody can do it. " And that means that the pros who bowl 40 or 50 games a week on the PBA tour, in the words of Rodney Dangerfield, "don't get no respect. " Yes, says Salvino, "it's our livelihood, but you take the guy who sits all day in his office at work. At night, he goes out and bowls in a league, and once in a while he rolls a 245. He figures, 'I can do it and I'm not an athlete, so the pros aren't athletes, either.
NEWS
February 16, 2014 | By Lou Rabito, Inquirer Columnist
There was Joe Nawn, living out a fantasy, taking a nighttime hobby sweetly into prime time, chatting with some of the top pro bowlers in the world, rolling practice shots with them and, pinch him if he's dreaming, playing in a major tournament with them. One moment, longtime PBA star Walter Ray Williams was telling him how nice it was to meet him and inviting him to join in some practice frames. The next, it seemed, Nawn was bowling games with Brian Kretzer and two other pros, while Hall of Famer Johnny Petraglia competed on the lane to his right.
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NEWS
February 16, 2014 | By Lou Rabito, Inquirer Columnist
There was Joe Nawn, living out a fantasy, taking a nighttime hobby sweetly into prime time, chatting with some of the top pro bowlers in the world, rolling practice shots with them and, pinch him if he's dreaming, playing in a major tournament with them. One moment, longtime PBA star Walter Ray Williams was telling him how nice it was to meet him and inviting him to join in some practice frames. The next, it seemed, Nawn was bowling games with Brian Kretzer and two other pros, while Hall of Famer Johnny Petraglia competed on the lane to his right.
SPORTS
May 11, 2010 | By NICK HOLLENSTEIN, hollenn@phillynews.com
It takes years of dedication to become a successful professional athlete. But determination paid off for Bill O'Neill, 28, of Southampton, Pa. In his fifth year on the PBA Tour, O'Neill is finally a winner in a major way. An All-America in college, he was the PBA's top rookie and had one of the best averages on the tour in his fourth season. The sport has been with him since he was 5 years old. O'Neill just followed his elders' example. "My whole family bowled," O'Neill said.
NEWS
April 1, 2010 | By Lou Rabito INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bill O'Neill started bowling when he was 5, maybe younger. He used to go to the old Fairlanes in Fairless Hills with his "grandpop," and attended his father's league matches at Jubilee Lanes in Levittown. He watched PBA Tour events on television, and followed Pete Weber and Amleto Monacelli. Two decades later, Weber and Monacelli are still part of the tour, sitting in the top third of the player-of-the year standings. And O'Neill? Here's looking up at you, kid. The 28-year-old Bucks County resident, born two years after Weber joined the pro tour, is tied for the lead in the player-of-the-year race with one tournament remaining.
SPORTS
March 21, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Liz Johnson made bowling history yesterday afternoon, but she still was disappointed. Johnson, 30, of Cheektowaga, N.Y., became the first woman to advance to the championship match of a Professional Bowlers Association tour event, but she lost by 27 pins to Tommy Jones in the final of the PBA Banquet Open at Spectrum Lanes in Wyoming, Mich. Johnson spent eight seasons on the Professional Women's Bowling Association tour, winning 11 events including the 1996 U.S. Open as a rookie and earning more than $500,000.
SPORTS
November 15, 2003 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Eric Forkel of Las Vegas led qualifying with a 4,134, 18-game pinfall last night in the PBA Greater Philadelphia Open at Sproul Lanes in Springfield. Forkel used a 279 high game and shot above 224 in every game until he closed out his evening with a 170 mark. He had been tied for 31st coming into the second round of qualifying. The round of 64 was pushed back to 5 p.m. due to Thursday night's high wind, which caused a power outage in Delaware County. The second group of initial qualifying had to finish its first nine games yesterday.
SPORTS
November 11, 2003 | By Don McKee INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shuttle buses moving eager fans from distant parking lots. A celebrity-spiced crowd signing autographs. The Phillie Phanatic cavorting with spectators to incessant rock music. And corporate sponsors paying for the right to get close to the action. The NBA All-Star Game? The World Series? The Republican National Convention? No. The PBA Tour's Greater Philadelphia Open is in town. Actually, it's at Sproul Lanes in Springfield, Delaware County, where autograph seekers can rub elbows with Phlex - the Phantoms' superhero mascot - and guys who spice their conversation with references to oil. Casual fans may think that men in open-necked shirts who worry about the quality of oil must work in the pit crew at NASCAR events.
SPORTS
November 11, 2003 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Steve Miller, president of the Professional Bowlers Association, says he dreams of the day when a pro bowler is hit by a car and people actually recognize him lying on the street. He says he imagines a time when the bowlers make enough money to start acting less like ordinary guys and more like jerks. For better or worse, those days are not on the immediate horizon. But the PBA Tour, which comes this week to Sproul Lanes in Springfield, Delaware County, is trying to elevate its status in the American sports scene.
SPORTS
December 11, 1990 | By Alex Rosen, Special to The Inquirer
Duane Fisher of Gloucester Township, who a few years ago electrified the bowling world with a four-game 1,104, including back-to-back 300s and a 299, recently celebrated his decision to leave the Professonal Bowlers Association tour as a full-time participant by winning a tournament in Taylor, Mich. Fisher, one of the finest bowlers in the area and a touring pro for many years, upset leading qualifier Jess Staybrook of San Diego, 248-234, for the $150,000 Budweiser Touring Players Championship.
SPORTS
September 19, 1989 | By Alex Rosen, Special to The Inquirer
Gene Carter Jr. of Glen Mills is one guy who can't wait to see his summer vacation come to an end. Carter is waiting for the start of the fall Professional Bowlers Association tour, which will begin early next month. He competed in nine events on the summer PBA tour, cashing paychecks in five of them. In the prestigious Miller Lite Challenge in Tucson, Ariz., in July, he finished a very respectable 29th. Carter, 24, also won his first PBA-sponsored event, the Eastern Regionals, in August at the Maple Lanes in Pennsauken.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1987 | By Don Russell, Special to The Inquirer
The problem with bowling's image as a sport, says Carmen Salvino, a member of the Professional Bowlers Association Hall of Fame, is that "everybody can do it. " And that means that the pros who bowl 40 or 50 games a week on the PBA tour, in the words of Rodney Dangerfield, "don't get no respect. " Yes, says Salvino, "it's our livelihood, but you take the guy who sits all day in his office at work. At night, he goes out and bowls in a league, and once in a while he rolls a 245. He figures, 'I can do it and I'm not an athlete, so the pros aren't athletes, either.
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