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SPORTS
October 28, 2000 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Keep this a secret, seeing as how their schools are heated rivals, but Penn Charter's Billy McKinney and Germantown Academy's Steve Holmes are buddies. Holmes, a quarterback-safety in football and defender in lacrosse, recently committed to Virginia while expressing his intention to play both sports. A PC guy worth the yellow stripes on his blue school sweater would never allow himself to be one-upped by a GA guy, so. . . "I might try to play both, too," McKinney said.
SPORTS
October 12, 1996 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Brendan Moore is not a card-carrying member of Penn Charter's Tough Guy Club. That's because there are no cards. But there are T-shirts and they are definitely worn with pride by Moore and the other six members. As you might guess, this Tough Guy Club is not exactly held in the same regard as PC's chapter of the National Honor Society. "Mostly it's just for fun, kind of a spoof thing," Moore said. "The school paper did an article on us, though. We have meetings once or twice a month where we talk about stuff . . . Yeah, stuff.
SPORTS
December 30, 1997 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
There's a reason people can watch Brett Storm and get the feeling he could probably succeed at any athletic endeavor. For proof positive, we report the results of the little bowling tournament staged by Penn Charter's basketball players to ease the boredom in this rainswept ghost town. Picking up a ball for the first time in a year, Storm rolled a 172 to win a small pot of money. A very small pot. "I got $15. We have a cheap team," Storm said, smiling. Storm, a 6-1, 175-pound sophomore, is a terrific, up-and-coming point guard.
SPORTS
April 11, 2000 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Jim "Flipper" Phillips was ready for the question long before it was asked. Phillips was ready even before a reporter wanted to ask it, having answered it first for himself and then for friends and family members as he applied for what he considered a dream job - though others viewed it as something quite different - and then anxiously awaited an answer. The question: Why would a basketball coach willingly go "backward"? Why would he relinquish a job as a Division I college assistant to coach a high school team?
SPORTS
December 31, 1998 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
It would be exaggerating to say Penn Charter School's Tom Pomrink reached the point at which he was moments from bidding adieu to basketball. But the thought popped into his mind. And it rattled around inside for a while. And it didn't leave until after he discussed the matter with coach Bill Gallagher. "Basketball used to be my life. I lived on the courts," said Pomrink, a 6-3, 215-pound forward. "But through my years at Penn Charter, it became my third sport behind football and lacrosse.
SPORTS
October 30, 1999 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
For a former lineman, Kenny Devenney ain't a bad quarterback. Heck, he'd be good for a lifelong quarterback. But facts are facts, and when Devenney, now a 6-foot, 180-pound junior at Penn Charter, was a seventh- and eighth-grader, his position on the nationally famous Little Quakers' weight team was - ta da - defensive tackle. "I'm sure when I came into PC," Devenney said, "coach [Brian] McCloskey was thinking he'd have a real good lineman. "Know what? Immediately after last season, when I realized how many big guys would be graduating, I told him I'd be willing to switch to the defensive line if that would help the team.
SPORTS
October 24, 1998 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Early this season before a Penn Charter football game, No. 78, at 6-3, 235 pounds, and wearing full equipment, released some pregame tension by running over to a goalpost, jumping up and grabbing the crossbar. "Who is that?" someone asked. "As a ninth-grader," coach Brian McCloskey said that day, "that kid couldn't get down in a three-point stance. We came close to telling him, 'It's not going to work. Find another sport.' " No. 78 is Kyle Chaffin. Next year, because of his talent and academics (2.9 grade-point average, 1,230 score on the Scholastic Assessment Test)
SPORTS
November 6, 1999 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Mike Ambrose, who's now getting practice in classrooms as a practicing attorney, would have gone down in flames last week had he tried to defend the play of Malvern Prep's football team. The unbeaten Friars not only lost to Germantown Academy in an important Inter-Ac League game, they were blasted, 49-14. "We weren't in the right mood going over there," said Ambrose, a senior running back. "That's a long bus ride. No one was talking. No one was into it. Once the game started and we saw what was happening, we tried to turn it on. But, too late.
SPORTS
February 26, 1994 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Mark "Shark" McGonagle used to think that his only purpose in basketball life was to . . . "Shoot 'threes' and score points," he said, cutting short a reporter and flashing a smile. McGonagle, a 6-1, 160-pound (he claims) senior, is in his third year of starting at wing guard for Penn Charter. Thankfully, he knows more than he used to. McGonagle last night contributed nine rebounds, five assists, two steals and three blocked shots, including the game-saver, as the Quakers downed visiting Haverford School, 44-41, to clinch a share of the Inter-Ac League championship.
NEWS
August 1, 2016
Last month I posed this question to readers: Where is the line between political correctness and manners? Do some people use "not being politically correct" as a justification for rudeness? Readers seemed unanimous in thinking that was the case. I agree. Like anything else, the correctness can go too far, but not being politically correct is often a veiled excuse to be just a little bit nasty to someone else. Here's how some of our readers answered: It seems that the term usually is used without any thought to the meaning behind it, merely to justify mean-spirited and generally unacceptable principles ("rudeness," if you will, but that's often contextually too mild a word)
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NEWS
August 1, 2016
Last month I posed this question to readers: Where is the line between political correctness and manners? Do some people use "not being politically correct" as a justification for rudeness? Readers seemed unanimous in thinking that was the case. I agree. Like anything else, the correctness can go too far, but not being politically correct is often a veiled excuse to be just a little bit nasty to someone else. Here's how some of our readers answered: It seems that the term usually is used without any thought to the meaning behind it, merely to justify mean-spirited and generally unacceptable principles ("rudeness," if you will, but that's often contextually too mild a word)
NEWS
May 31, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
AMC's computer-industry period drama, Halt and Catch Fire , returns for its second season at 10 p.m. Sunday a fresher, better, stronger series. Viewers who missed it last year may want to give the drama - and its handsome cast led by Lee Pace, Scoot McNairy, Mackenzie Davis, and Kerry Bishé - another chance. In its first season, Halt tried to capitalize on the public's fascination with the birth of the PC era and the geniuses who created it, men such as Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, and Bill Gates.
SPORTS
October 29, 2014 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com
ALEX HORNIBROOK wrote his name into the Malvern Prep record books twice yesterday against host Penn Charter. Fortunately, for posterity's sake, the senior quarterback's first signature was in pen; the second, pencil. After the Friars ran away from the Quakers, 44-16, the 6-4, 212-pound senior was congratulated by an assistant coach on becoming the school's single-season passing champ. For a few minutes anyway, it was thought Hornibrook also owned the school's career yardage mark, but not quite yet. "I wasn't really thinking about it too much today," Hornibrook said, "but I guess the one thing is it's awesome that I can do it at home.
SPORTS
January 9, 2014 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Germantown Academy lost all five starters from a squad that went 22-6 and was perfect in the Inter-Ac League, so juniors Sam Lindgren and Tim Guers heard considerable talk about possible rebuilding pains. "It makes us play hard," Lindgren said. "We don't want anybody thinking we're going to have a down year. " Guers added: "We were looking to prove the doubters wrong. We believed in each other. " So much for a major drop-off. With Lindgren and Guers combining for 29 points, the Patriots (10-5)
NEWS
October 11, 2013
WHILE THE rest of the country is, to take a phrase from Pope Francis, "obsessed" with the fiscal farce in D.C., President Obama has decided to weigh in on a major human-rights violation. Three guesses as to what it is. The massacre of Christians in the Muslim world? Yawn. The death of hundreds of refugees off the coast of Sicily? Nope. The devastation in Syria? (Been there, done that. Sort of.) No, the president's righteous indignation was reserved this week for the evil owners of a Washington football team that has apparently violated the Nuremberg rules and refused to change its name to "The Washington Non-Offensives.
SPORTS
May 7, 2013 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writer silaryt@phillynews.com
STEVEN MIRAGLIA finished a lengthy discussion about the ins and outs of his life by making the comment, "Everything's going smoothly. Knock on wood. " Those were not some lighthearted, throw-away lines. The 5-10, 210-pound Miraglia is, thankfully, winding down his final season as an important first baseman for Prep Charter's baseball team. From late September into wintertime, he was worried there'd be no more sports in his life . . . after first getting past the fear that perhaps there'd be no life at all. Because of infections on the inside and outside of his heart, Miraglia spent roughly 2 weeks at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and was out of school for close to 1 1/2 months.
SPORTS
January 23, 2013 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writer silaryt@phillynews.com
TAKE AWAY 17 points from visiting Germantown Academy and give them to Penn Charter and there's a different winner Tuesday in an entertaining Inter-Ac League basketball contest. That scenario is mentioned because James Drury applied to both schools back in the day. PC put him on a waiting list. GA did not. That helped to simplify matters, Plus, Drury's brother, Dennis ('05), had been a very successful winter athlete at the latter. Not in hoops. Not in swimming. Not in ice hockey.
SPORTS
October 29, 2012 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writer
THINK OF THE usual time difference between births of twins. Maybe 7 minutes here. Perhaps 19 there. And then you have the Cades, star senior football players for Delaware Valley Charter. Rashan, more commonly known to teammates as "Twin One," entered this world 2 1/2 hours before Rasheed, a k a "Twin Two. " Speaking of 150 minutes, that was roughly how long Rasheed had to go it alone Saturday - twins-wise, anyway - at Germantown's Ben Johnston Memorial Stadium in a Public AA semifinal vs. Prep Charter.
SPORTS
October 24, 2012 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writer
WHILE HE stirred no memories of his famous cousin, Mike McGlinchey last Friday lifted the number of high school pass-throwers in the maternal portion of his family to six. Considering his height (6-9) and weight (275), he also likely became the biggest kid in city history to whip one downfield. McGlinchey, a senior at Penn Charter who's bound for Notre Dame, did not text or call Matt Ryan, the PC/Boston College product now creating a NFL-wide buzz for the Atlanta Falcons, about his chance to rack up passing yardage.
SPORTS
October 21, 2012 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Staff Writer
In some families, Troy Gallen would have been unceremoniously ostracized. In others, he might have been forced to take out the trash every hour and/or cut the lawn three times a week. His crime? Turning his back on the school where his father and brother experienced football success. The 5-11, 175-pound Gallen, a junior, is now a dual-threat running back at Malvern Prep. But until 3 years ago, he always dreamed of attending Cardinal O'Hara and, who knows, he might be there now if not for one of Malvern's players.
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