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Peace And War

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NEWS
June 2, 2013
Julian "Jules" Tolbert is a U.S. Air Force colonel and command pilot, and was the chief of the War Plans Division on the Joint Staff Stephen J. Mariano is a U.S. Army strategist, was a senior fellow at Harvard University's Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and holds a Ph.D. from the Royal Military College of Canada The U.S. Army is going to get smaller, and it knows it. But the first question Congress, the American people, and the Army should ask isn't "how small?"
NEWS
May 28, 2000 | By Michelle Jeffery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
By the end of World War II, Arnold Snyder had been honored by the Army several times for his heroism and gallantry in the line of duty. Now, the 76-year-old veteran from Cheltenham says, it is his turn to honor the country's servicemen and women, whether they charged the beaches of Normandy or stood at the ready on a quiet military base. "Over the years, we never recognized the veterans who did not serve in combat," Snyder said. That is why he is working with Cheltenham Township to build a monument at Curtis Arboretum that would commemorate all who served in the military, dating back to the Revolutionary War. "Those who served in wartime are important, and those who served in peace are important," Snyder said.
NEWS
July 18, 1988 | By Claude Lewis, Inquirer Editorial Board
When I was a boy in New York City, no initials instilled more pride in me than the FBI. I can recall sitting around the dinner table with my dad, mom and brothers listening to one of our favorite shows, The FBI in Peace and War. The program opened with spirited music and an announcer's strident voice filled with pride of country and visions of integrity, honesty and justice. The program made us all feel safe and FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover symbolized all that was good in America.
NEWS
May 29, 1987 | By HENRY F. GRAFF, From the New York Times
President Reagan's eulogy of the 37 men killed in the Iraqi attack on the frigate Stark and the personal solace he brought to survivors at the Mayport Naval Station in Florida constituted the latest evidence that he has become the nation's chief pastor. While previous Presidents wrote occasional letters of condolence to families, and celebrated the bravery of particular servicemen, Reagan's direct participation in religious services has only minor precedent. The practice is not desirable.
NEWS
October 4, 1987 | By Bridgett M. Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The hand-painted mural that dominates the back wall of the main room of Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3612 in Willow Grove spans nearly 40 feet. It took its artist 660 hours over an 11-month period to complete. And he researched his subject for three months before wielding his paintbrush. To be sure, it was a labor of love for artist James McKenney. His care is evident in the simulated whir of World War I airplane propellers. It is there in the shadows of desolate soldiers trudging through sand in a Korean battle.
NEWS
October 26, 2007 | By Kevin Ferris
There's always something to do in downtown West Chester. Bike races, restaurant festivals, chili cookoffs, parades. There are Swinging Thursdays, First Fridays, and something new this fall: Showdown Saturdays. They're a spin-off from the peace vigils that have been a Saturday morning staple at the Chester County Courthouse on High and Market Streets for five years. The new twist is the Victory Vigilers, who felt the weekly message from the Peace Vigilers was a tad one-sided.
NEWS
December 2, 1995 | BY JOSEPH SOBRAN
"In the choice between peace and war, America must choose peace. " So America will send 20,000 troops to Bosnia. I wonder how many would be sent if America had chosen war. President Clinton's explanation of his decision reminded me of the amused but haunting observation a British-born friend of mine made recently: that "the United States is an empire - and the American people don't even realize it. " Though the U.S. government possesses the...
NEWS
November 3, 1991 | From Inquirer Wire Services
With anger and supplication, epithets and appeals, the Arab and Israeli leaders who gathered in Madrid last week spoke passionately about peace and war and history. They rarely agreed. They often spoke past one another to the television cameras and to distant constituents. But in the first peace conference of its kind, the leaders of the Mideast spoke with heartfelt fervor of their long- standing grievances and aspirations. Here are excerpts from some of the speeches last week at Madrid's Royal Palace: YITZHAK SHAMIR, ISRAELI PRIME MINISTER ". . . The people of Israel look to this palace with great anticipation and expectation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In The Year of the Quiet Sun, a film of broken hearts and lost chances that is heartbreaking in its impact, writer/director Krzysztof Zanussi reminds us that there is such a thing as being a victim of peace. His extraordinary movie is set in western Poland in 1946, a land that has been under the boot of the Germans and that is being reclaimed by the Poles. To this country comes the flotsam of a devastating war - the refugees, the black marketeers from both sides, the deserters and the Americans planning war-crimes tribunals.
NEWS
October 9, 2014 | BY GREGORY A. DADDIS
AS THE United States charges once more into war, little debate has centered on the actual utility of war. Instead, policymakers and pundits have focused their comments on combating the latest danger to our nation and its interests as posed by Islamic State militants. In late August, Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel claimed that Islamic State was an "imminent threat to every interest we have" and that the sophisticated group was "beyond anything we've seen. " With few dissenting voices, either in Congress or in the American media, U.S. air forces plunged again into the unstable region of the Middle East.
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NEWS
October 9, 2014 | BY GREGORY A. DADDIS
AS THE United States charges once more into war, little debate has centered on the actual utility of war. Instead, policymakers and pundits have focused their comments on combating the latest danger to our nation and its interests as posed by Islamic State militants. In late August, Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel claimed that Islamic State was an "imminent threat to every interest we have" and that the sophisticated group was "beyond anything we've seen. " With few dissenting voices, either in Congress or in the American media, U.S. air forces plunged again into the unstable region of the Middle East.
NEWS
June 2, 2013
Julian "Jules" Tolbert is a U.S. Air Force colonel and command pilot, and was the chief of the War Plans Division on the Joint Staff Stephen J. Mariano is a U.S. Army strategist, was a senior fellow at Harvard University's Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and holds a Ph.D. from the Royal Military College of Canada The U.S. Army is going to get smaller, and it knows it. But the first question Congress, the American people, and the Army should ask isn't "how small?"
NEWS
October 26, 2007 | By Kevin Ferris
There's always something to do in downtown West Chester. Bike races, restaurant festivals, chili cookoffs, parades. There are Swinging Thursdays, First Fridays, and something new this fall: Showdown Saturdays. They're a spin-off from the peace vigils that have been a Saturday morning staple at the Chester County Courthouse on High and Market Streets for five years. The new twist is the Victory Vigilers, who felt the weekly message from the Peace Vigilers was a tad one-sided.
NEWS
May 28, 2000 | By Michelle Jeffery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
By the end of World War II, Arnold Snyder had been honored by the Army several times for his heroism and gallantry in the line of duty. Now, the 76-year-old veteran from Cheltenham says, it is his turn to honor the country's servicemen and women, whether they charged the beaches of Normandy or stood at the ready on a quiet military base. "Over the years, we never recognized the veterans who did not serve in combat," Snyder said. That is why he is working with Cheltenham Township to build a monument at Curtis Arboretum that would commemorate all who served in the military, dating back to the Revolutionary War. "Those who served in wartime are important, and those who served in peace are important," Snyder said.
NEWS
December 2, 1995 | BY JOSEPH SOBRAN
"In the choice between peace and war, America must choose peace. " So America will send 20,000 troops to Bosnia. I wonder how many would be sent if America had chosen war. President Clinton's explanation of his decision reminded me of the amused but haunting observation a British-born friend of mine made recently: that "the United States is an empire - and the American people don't even realize it. " Though the U.S. government possesses the...
NEWS
November 3, 1991 | From Inquirer Wire Services
With anger and supplication, epithets and appeals, the Arab and Israeli leaders who gathered in Madrid last week spoke passionately about peace and war and history. They rarely agreed. They often spoke past one another to the television cameras and to distant constituents. But in the first peace conference of its kind, the leaders of the Mideast spoke with heartfelt fervor of their long- standing grievances and aspirations. Here are excerpts from some of the speeches last week at Madrid's Royal Palace: YITZHAK SHAMIR, ISRAELI PRIME MINISTER ". . . The people of Israel look to this palace with great anticipation and expectation.
NEWS
January 16, 1991 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer staff writers Larry Eichel and Andrew Maykuth and Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
As the U.N. deadline for Iraq's withdrawal from Kuwait expired last night, war in the world's ancient cradle of civilization appeared all but inevitable. But while Iraq remained defiant, there were no reports of air raids, missile attacks or any shots being fired by anyone anywhere in the Persian Gulf region in the first hours after the deadline passed, at midnight Eastern Standard Time or 8 this morning in Baghdad. Last-minute peace proposals by France and Britain died at the United Nations, and President Bush was described as "at peace with himself . . . ready to make the tough decisions that are necessary.
NEWS
July 18, 1988 | By Claude Lewis, Inquirer Editorial Board
When I was a boy in New York City, no initials instilled more pride in me than the FBI. I can recall sitting around the dinner table with my dad, mom and brothers listening to one of our favorite shows, The FBI in Peace and War. The program opened with spirited music and an announcer's strident voice filled with pride of country and visions of integrity, honesty and justice. The program made us all feel safe and FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover symbolized all that was good in America.
NEWS
April 12, 1988 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The conservatively cropped hair, wide eyes, rosy cheeks and soothing voice can be a bit deceptive. Sister Margaret McKenna likes to shock people. On Easter, the Medical Mission Sister from Northeast Philadelphia got her wish when she and three others used hammers and their own blood to do "symbolic damage" to four empty Tomahawk nuclear-missile launchers aboard the battleship Iowa at Norfolk Naval Station near here. An FBI agent she met called her a hypocrite. A federal marshal not too subtly implied that she was an idiot.
NEWS
January 11, 1988
WHO'S TO BLAME FOR AIDS In his petulant little foot stomp of a Guest Opinion on Dec. 21, Tommi- with-an-i Avicolli blames the president, local government, "cowardly health officials," assorted neo-Nazis, and (by implication) motherhood, apple pie and the flag for the spread of AIDS. About the only groups whose feet he doesn't hold to his self-serving fire are the needle freaks and teahouse types most afflicted by the disease - and most responsible for its transmission. "This crisis should never have been allowed to spread so quickly and so far," whines Tommi-with-an-i.
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