CollectionsPeace Corps
IN THE NEWS

Peace Corps

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 26, 1990 | By Owen Ullmann, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Bush administration is considering a mass evacuation of Peace Corps volunteers from the Philippines because of threats to their safety from communist guerrillas, administration officials said last night. The State Department directed all 261 volunteers in the country to proceed to Manila, the capital, while the administration pondered whether to bring them back to the United States. The decision could be made as early as today, according to one administration official. "This is a decision the U.S. ambassador (Nicholas Platt)
NEWS
April 24, 2013 | By Michelle R. Smith, Katie Zezima, and Jack Gillum, Associated Press
PROVIDENCE, R.I. - Katherine Russell was a talented artist, a good student who grew up Christian, the daughter of a suburban doctor. Then she went off to college in Boston. A few years later, she had dropped out of school, converted to Islam and was Katherine Tsarnaeva, wife of a man who would become a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings. Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, and his brother, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, two ethnic Chechen brothers from southern Russia, are accused of planting two shrapnel-packed pressure-cooker bombs near the marathon finish line last week, killing three people and injuring more than 180. Tamerlan was killed in a getaway attempt after a gun battle with police.
NEWS
May 12, 2011 | By Julie Mianecki, Tribune Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - After Karestan Koenen was raped by a local man soon after she arrived in Niger as a Peace Corps volunteer in 1991, she says she got no support from local Peace Corps officials and a chilling reception when she was sent back to Washington. "I was sent to speak with a Peace Corps staff investigator, who said, 'I am so sick of you girls going over there, drinking, dancing, and partying, and then if a guy comes on to you, you say you were raped,' " Koenen told a congressional committee Wednesday.
NEWS
November 7, 2012
Jack Hood Vaughn, 92, who led the Peace Corps at the height of its volunteer enrollment in the late 1960s, died Oct. 29 at his home in Tucson, Ariz. The cause was cancer, his daughter Jane Constantineau said. President Lyndon B. Johnson appointed Mr. Vaughn as the second director of the Peace Corps in 1966, after the five-year tenure of R. Sargent Shriver, the driving force in the creation of the corps during the Kennedy administration. Under Mr. Vaughn, the number of volunteers rose from approximately 12,000 to more than 15,500 - the most in the corp's history - serving in more than 50 countries.
NEWS
November 25, 1996 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The requests come in from Central America, West Africa, Eastern Europe and the newly formed states of the former Soviet Union. Nonprofit groups in poor countries are asking the Peace Corps for volunteers to help them organize, grow and perform the work that their governments are unable to do. They want to protect their environment, increase economic opportunities and improve health care and education. And part of the answer lies here, in one of the poorest cities in the United States - where the Peace Corps today is scheduled to join Rutgers University in announcing a unique master's degree program to prepare volunteers for the management of nonprofit organizations overseas.
NEWS
December 6, 1987 | By Laura Quinn, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an age of five-digit college tuition, who can afford to join the Peace Corps? The question has occurred to Greg Jackson, a recent graduate of Lafayette College who faces years of debt for his schooling. The idea of full-time volunteer work after graduation seems ludicrous, he said. "Who in their right mind would want to invest two or three years without seeing some dollar signs on the horizon?" he wondered. Yet Jackson has been persuaded to join. To put it bluntly, it will help his career.
NEWS
December 2, 1990 | By Shrona Foreman, Inquirer Washington Bureau
While many government agencies are being squeezed, business is booming at the Peace Corps, which is implementing big program expansions after receiving a $21 million budget increase, its largest in 20 years. The extra money is being spent, in part, to respond to requests for volunteers in Central and Eastern Europe for the first time in the agency's 30-year history. The corps will also set up new programs in Africa and Asia. "This is a worldwide effort, not an isolated expansion," corps director Paul D. Coverdell said.
NEWS
January 19, 1991 | By Christopher Scanlan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Fearing terrorist attacks inspired by Persian Gulf hostilities, the Peace Corps has abruptly evacuated 285 volunteers assigned to the predominantly Muslim nations of Tunisia, Morocco, Mauritania and Pakistan. "They were withdrawn because of a decision made by the State Department that their lives were at risk from terrorists, not from the government or the people they work with," said Peace Corps director Paul Coverdell. "The risk had just gotten too high in that region of the world.
NEWS
January 7, 1992 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
An assault aimed at establishing an English-language beachhead in Poland has been launched by the Peace Corps, with a big assist from Philadelphia-area people. Of the 229 Peace Corps volunteers now in Poland, 165 are teaching teachers to teach English. The corps began gearing up in the spring of 1990 to send volunteers, and the first contingent arrived there the following summer. It was bolstered, as future contingents will be, by support from the Liberty Bell Foundation here.
NEWS
April 13, 1992 | By Tawn Nhan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New York management consultant Christine Donolo, 42, has it all. A supportive family, a nice Manhattan apartment, a thriving business. But upon arriving at Philadelphia's Barclay Hotel last Wednesday, she tossed it all aside. All for a two-year stint with the Peace Corps in Bulgaria, where she'll get paid about $150 a month. "I wanted the challenge and the excitement," said Donolo, owner of a 10- year-old management-consulting firm. There are lots of Christine Donolos.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Since his death in 1993, there's been no diminished awe where Frank Zappa is concerned. An absurd, sarcastic humorist and a genre-jumping composer whose output included avant-garde classicism, psychedelia, progressive jazz, doo-wop, musique concrète, and heavy metal, the thing that made him most magical - from a purely instrumental standpoint - was his dexterous, adventurous guitar playing. Tense, dissonant riffs with shifting time signatures or speedy, clearly plucked, note-bending solos - either way, Zappa stung and swung.
NEWS
March 11, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The money ran out, and Zach Meeink lost his anchor. Build On, a national nonprofit that aims to break the cycle of poverty and illiteracy, has abruptly ended the program it operated successfully in several city high schools for 13 years. Officials with the organization say they could not raise enough cash to sustain the Philadelphia after-school program, which they described as among their strongest in the country. Build On students identify problems they see in their communities, then volunteer to repair them, helping children, the elderly, and the homeless.
NEWS
January 14, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you're an AmeriCorps or Peace Corps alumnus, the City of Philadelphia is looking to hire you. Starting this month, Philadelphia will award up to 5 points on its 100-point civil service exam for alumni of national service programs AmeriCorps and the Peace Corps. Mayor Nutter made the announcement along with Wendy Spencer, CEO of the Corporation for National & Community Service, a federal agency which oversees AmeriCorps. "These individuals, through their service, create critical thinking skills, demonstrate leadership qualities, responsibility and they become the kind of invaluable workers that any employer would want," Nutter said.
NEWS
July 11, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tom Kessinger, 73, of Annapolis, Md., a former president of Haverford College who imbued campus life with his own Quaker roots and values, died Friday, July 4, at Anne Arundel Medical Center there. The college announced his death on its website, saying Dr. Kessinger had fallen two weeks ago and injured his head while playing tennis. Dr. Kessinger became the school's 11th president in 1988 and stayed until 1996. Under his tenure, Founders Hall and other buildings on the Main Line campus received renovation.
NEWS
July 4, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jack Lutz, 92, of Mount Laurel, an educator in the Philadelphia area and abroad, died Sunday, June 29, at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital of a subdural hematoma. Dr. Lutz taught in Philadelphia public schools, then joined the Plymouth Whitemarsh School District as principal of three elementary schools. When Plymouth Whitemarsh expanded to become the Colonial School District, he was named assistant superintendent for curriculum. As the Philadelphia suburbs grew, he oversaw the design and construction of new schools, and for 10 years, recruited and hired teachers.
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HE WAS ONE awesome Santa! At 6-foot-6, Richard A. Binder obviously had the kind and loving demeanor that kept him from scaring the pants off the little ones who wanted to get in their bids for Christmas gifts. Richard assumed his Santa role for the Christmas party given annually by the Drexel University library, where he worked for more than 25 years. Taking care of children's wishes was typical of the spirit of this man, who spent his life caring for others, serving the poor, the spiritual needs of prisoners, the needy of Iran as a Peace Corps member, among others.
NEWS
April 24, 2013 | By Michelle R. Smith, Katie Zezima, and Jack Gillum, Associated Press
PROVIDENCE, R.I. - Katherine Russell was a talented artist, a good student who grew up Christian, the daughter of a suburban doctor. Then she went off to college in Boston. A few years later, she had dropped out of school, converted to Islam and was Katherine Tsarnaeva, wife of a man who would become a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings. Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, and his brother, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, two ethnic Chechen brothers from southern Russia, are accused of planting two shrapnel-packed pressure-cooker bombs near the marathon finish line last week, killing three people and injuring more than 180. Tamerlan was killed in a getaway attempt after a gun battle with police.
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - At a lavish reception two weeks ago to honor the 2012 recipients of the Presidential Citizens Medal, the nation's top honor for civilian service, President Obama gave a shout-out to one of the 18 winners at the very start. "It would be easy for folks to just focus on themselves," Obama said. But in the United States, "we get each other's backs. ... That's why volunteering in America is at the highest level it has been in years. And I know that makes Harris proud to hear.
NEWS
November 7, 2012
Jack Hood Vaughn, 92, who led the Peace Corps at the height of its volunteer enrollment in the late 1960s, died Oct. 29 at his home in Tucson, Ariz. The cause was cancer, his daughter Jane Constantineau said. President Lyndon B. Johnson appointed Mr. Vaughn as the second director of the Peace Corps in 1966, after the five-year tenure of R. Sargent Shriver, the driving force in the creation of the corps during the Kennedy administration. Under Mr. Vaughn, the number of volunteers rose from approximately 12,000 to more than 15,500 - the most in the corp's history - serving in more than 50 countries.
NEWS
April 22, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the Allies hit the beaches of Normandy on June 6, 1944, Michele Anguenot scoffed at the rumors she heard at her school in eastern France. That day happened to be her 16th birthday and, she told her family, she thought the invasion reports were a birthday hoax dreamed up by her school friends. "It took her until that night," her son, Christian, said in a phone interview, that her family "convinced her that it was real. " It was not her only memorable birthday. When she turned 70, she was a Peace Corps worker in a West African village.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|