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Peace Movement

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NEWS
November 22, 1987 | By Julia Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are still the cute bumper stickers proclaiming "Arms are for Hugging" and "Robin Hood was Right," the tie-dyed T-shirts and the ubiquitous dove. But the words being used to describe the gathering here this weekend of peace activists - and the movement they represent - are "sophistication" and "maturity. " Those qualities are visible in many of the roughly 1,000 people attending "Beyond the Cold War," the founding national congress of SANE/FREEZE, an organization born from the merger of two peace groups.
NEWS
April 13, 1989 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul D. Zimmerman felt that he was in danger of becoming a shadow. He was a marcher, but these days there is no big parade. He was a protester, but these days there is no big protest. What, then, does any anti-nuclear activist do in the absence of a strong national peace movement? He plants trees in a public park. He repairs a homeless shelter. "I think we've found a solution to how to be a viable local peace movement, when there's no strong national agenda" being produced by national peace groups, Zimmerman said in a recent interview near his home in the Bucks County township of Upper Makefield.
NEWS
November 10, 1987 | BY EDWARD JOHN HUDAK
The other day, I was cleaning out some old research files and found an article. I had put away for future consideration and comment. When I reread the piece, in the July/August edition of the "Disability Rag," I once again realized why I had put it aside. The essay, "Why I Work in the Peace Movement" by Margaret House, pierced the accumulated layers of nonsense coating my everyday mind, and touched some place deep down where truth and honesty live. House's language is the laser light burning into the malignant tumor of ignorant and careless behavior which condemns many disabled people to wasted lives.
NEWS
June 1, 2004 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mildred McHugh had never attended a political protest until a few months ago. Now she's a regular at antiwar demonstrations, carrying a sign that reads, "Bring my son home. " "I feel so outraged about the way we were misled about the war," said McHugh, 44, of Pennington, N.J., whose soldier son, Steve, is stationed in Iraq's Sunni Triangle. "I need to be out here and feel like at least I'm doing something. . . . If it doesn't save my son, it might save someone else's. " A member of Military Families Speak Out, McHugh is the newest of recruits to an increasingly energized peace movement.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the beginning, when the war in Iraq was still making headlines and CNN was still showing footage of the air strikes in Baghdad, the Chester County Peace Movement could draw crowds as large as 700 to its weekly protests outside the county courthouse in West Chester. These days, the group is lucky if more than a dozen show up. But every Saturday for the last 10 years, they have never missed a protest. And though the war in Iraq is technically over - U.S. troops pulled out in December 2011 - for the members of the peace movement, the protest never really ends.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2006 | By GLENN WHIPP Los Angeles Daily News
With "Sir! No Sir!," filmmaker David Zeiger attacks what he believes to be the myth of the spat-upon Vietnam veteran (pacifists and women do not spit) as well as the idea that the era's peaceniks and soldiers shared no common ground. Zeiger, in fact, aims to reshape the way the Vietnam peace movement has come to be seen as well as stake some claims to current relevancy with regard to the wars America is now fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan. Sounds like a tall order, huh? Zeiger only partially succeeds in fulfilling his ambitions, coming up short for many of the same reasons that hampered the equally well-intentioned antiwar documentary "Why We Fight," which opened earlier this year.
NEWS
November 19, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William C. Davidon, 86, a player in the peace movement in Philadelphia during the Vietnam War, died Friday, Nov. 8, of Parkinson's disease in Highlands Ranch, Colo., where he had lived since 2010. He was a leader in the National Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy. A physics professor at Haverford College starting in 1961, Dr. Davidon led various campus, scientific, and other peace organizations. He worked with Philadelphia Resistance, which provided support to young men who refused to be drafted into the military, and to soldiers already inducted who wished to leave because of their opposition to the war. Dr. Davidon told his family that one of the most gratifying aspects of his antiwar activism was the time he spent discussing the war with troops at a coffeehouse near Fort Dix. As the war unfolded, Dr. Davidon was drawn to more aggressive protest, including participation in draft board raids conducted by the Catholic peace movement in Philadelphia and Delaware.
NEWS
January 28, 1991 | BY CAL THOMAS
The "peace movement," moribund since the Vietnam War, is trying to jump- start itself over the conflict in the Persian Gulf. Back from the grave of obscurity they come, from Daniel Ellsberg to Ramsey Clark, chanting the same tired slogans that sound like mantras in the mouths of some Near East mystic. They hope to reach a crescendo with a "massive" nationwide protest next month. The peace movement always tries to seize the moral high ground by declaring itself against all war. This time there's a new twist.
NEWS
November 20, 2001 | By CHRISTOPHER HITCHENS
I BEGAN to notice a few weeks ago that the "peace" movement had a new mantra: "Afghanistan, where the world's richest country rains bombs on the world's poorest. " Well, what about "Afghanistan, where the world's most open society confronts the most closed one"? Or "Where American women pilots kill the men who enslave women. " "Where the world's most indiscriminate bombers are bombed by the world's most accurate ones. " "Where the largest number of poor people applaud the bombing of their own regime.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 19, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William C. Davidon, 86, a player in the peace movement in Philadelphia during the Vietnam War, died Friday, Nov. 8, of Parkinson's disease in Highlands Ranch, Colo., where he had lived since 2010. He was a leader in the National Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy. A physics professor at Haverford College starting in 1961, Dr. Davidon led various campus, scientific, and other peace organizations. He worked with Philadelphia Resistance, which provided support to young men who refused to be drafted into the military, and to soldiers already inducted who wished to leave because of their opposition to the war. Dr. Davidon told his family that one of the most gratifying aspects of his antiwar activism was the time he spent discussing the war with troops at a coffeehouse near Fort Dix. As the war unfolded, Dr. Davidon was drawn to more aggressive protest, including participation in draft board raids conducted by the Catholic peace movement in Philadelphia and Delaware.
NEWS
May 28, 2013 | By Raf Casert and Jamey Keaten, Associated Press
BRUSSELS, Belgium - The European Union has decided to lift the arms embargo on the Syrian opposition while maintaining all other sanctions against President Bashar al-Assad's regime after June 1, British Foreign Secretary William Hague said late Monday. The decision "sends a very strong message from Europe to the Assad regime," Hague said after an all-day meeting that laid bare EU hesitation on feeding arms in a foreign conflict only months after it won the Nobel Peace Prize. Hague insisted that Britain had "no immediate plans to send arms to Syria.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the beginning, when the war in Iraq was still making headlines and CNN was still showing footage of the air strikes in Baghdad, the Chester County Peace Movement could draw crowds as large as 700 to its weekly protests outside the county courthouse in West Chester. These days, the group is lucky if more than a dozen show up. But every Saturday for the last 10 years, they have never missed a protest. And though the war in Iraq is technically over - U.S. troops pulled out in December 2011 - for the members of the peace movement, the protest never really ends.
NEWS
July 2, 2011
A letter on June 24 ("How justifications morphed into lies") posed the question, "Where have all the peaceniks gone?" It is a question I see raised often these days, especially with regard to the wars in Afghanistan and Libya. Well, as it happens, we "peaceniks" have never stopped our antiwar activities. The Chester County Peace Movement's weekly peace vigils on Saturdays at the Chester County Courthouse have continued with no break for almost nine years (something of an international record, we hear)
NEWS
January 20, 2008 | By Ed Mahon FOR THE INQUIRER
When it comes to fighting for peace, Beth Centz prepares the signs and Tom Mullian plays the songs. Centz, 54, of Middletown, and Mullian, 55, of Media, will bring both tools to a demonstration tomorrow at the King of Prussia site of Lockheed Martin Corp., the world's largest military contractor. The two are members of the Brandywine Peace Community, a faith-based group founded in Middletown in 1977, based in Swarthmore now, and with a mailing list that reaches across the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2006 | By GLENN WHIPP Los Angeles Daily News
With "Sir! No Sir!," filmmaker David Zeiger attacks what he believes to be the myth of the spat-upon Vietnam veteran (pacifists and women do not spit) as well as the idea that the era's peaceniks and soldiers shared no common ground. Zeiger, in fact, aims to reshape the way the Vietnam peace movement has come to be seen as well as stake some claims to current relevancy with regard to the wars America is now fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan. Sounds like a tall order, huh? Zeiger only partially succeeds in fulfilling his ambitions, coming up short for many of the same reasons that hampered the equally well-intentioned antiwar documentary "Why We Fight," which opened earlier this year.
NEWS
August 18, 2004
Gov. McGreevey's scandal is not that he's gay. (Think Rep. Barney Frank.) Nor that he had an affair. (President Clinton survived lying under oath about his affair.) No, McGreevey's scandal is that he gave his boy toy from Israel the top position in the state department of homeland security for which he was unqualified. Many are saying how "courageous" McGreevey is for revealing he's gay. How much courage does it take to come clean only after someone threatens to sue you? And for those who think putting off his resignation until Nov. 15 is NOT a political calculation to both keep the governorship in Democrat hands and help John Kerry, I know an NRA member who believes all guns should only be able to hold one bullet at a time.
NEWS
July 29, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charles Coates Walker, 83, of Cheyney, an advocate for peace and social justice, died of complications of diabetes July 11 at Barclay Friends Nursing Home in West Chester. In 1991, after more than 50 years as a peace activist, Mr. Walker traveled to India to receive the Jamnalal Bajaj Foundation Award, which recognizes those who promote the nonviolent ideals of Mahatma Gandhi. During World War II, Mr. Walker, a Quaker and conscientious objector, went to jail rather than fight.
NEWS
June 1, 2004 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mildred McHugh had never attended a political protest until a few months ago. Now she's a regular at antiwar demonstrations, carrying a sign that reads, "Bring my son home. " "I feel so outraged about the way we were misled about the war," said McHugh, 44, of Pennington, N.J., whose soldier son, Steve, is stationed in Iraq's Sunni Triangle. "I need to be out here and feel like at least I'm doing something. . . . If it doesn't save my son, it might save someone else's. " A member of Military Families Speak Out, McHugh is the newest of recruits to an increasingly energized peace movement.
NEWS
January 21, 2003
I do not know whether there are any African Americans drafting and writing speeches for George W. Bush, but I am certain that none of the speechwriters are historians. A historian would have questioned the political efficacy of announcing that his administration was filing an amicus curiae brief on behalf of white students at the University of Michigan and in opposition to affirmative action on the occasion of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday (Jan. 15). Frankly, given that the Republican Party has stretched out its hands to minorities to join its ranks, it is surprising that it would take the opportunity of King's birthday to contradict his message, philsophy and life's work.
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