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Peace

NEWS
April 17, 2006 | By Colman McCarthy
One of the irksome problems people had with the Rev. William Sloane Coffin was his manner of taking radical Christianity into the fortresses of the comfortable and conventional. Like Yale University, where he served as the Protestant chaplain from 1958 to 1976. Or the stately and WASPy Riverside Church in Manhattan, where he was the senior minister from 1978 through the mid-1980s. Or at a conference of private school headmasters in Richmond, Va., where I last spent time with him four years ago. As on every occasion over the decades when we ran into each other and gabbed a bit, Bill Coffin was personally gentle and professionally fiery.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | By Nathan Gorenstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twelve hours before the deadline for Saddam Hussein to pull his army out of Kuwait, 70 Delaware County residents put on one last rally for peace. At noon Tuesday, they lined up outside U.S. Rep. Curt Weldon's Upper Darby office carrying placards, wearing armbands blazoned with white doves and displaying an oil barrel featuring the words "No Blood for Oil. " Mostly middle-age and elderly, with a smattering of college students, the crowd included a 42-year-old Vietnam veteran, an 81-year-old art therapist and a 48-year-old postman.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2011 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Staff Writer
When his children were young, Peter Prusinowski walked them in Penn Treaty Park. The place spoke to him. The Polish immigrant was fascinated by what happened there in 1682, the year William Penn and Chief Tamanend of the Leni-Lenape Indians made a pact of peace under a magnificent elm. "It was a treaty based on friendship and love," said Prusinowski, who lives in Fishtown. "The place became sacred to me, and one day, my heart was telling me this is something I needed to do. " That "something" was something indeed - a 2,000-mile, 143-day journey from Philadelphia to Oklahoma - on foot.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
They arrived at Camp Saginaw carrying sleeping bags and blankets, hustled about a soccer field, mounted go-karts - even made s'mores. And just after 1 p.m. Saturday, the scores of boys and men turned east, toward Mecca. "There's a time for prayer, and there's a time for play," said Ahmad Chaudhry, 39, as the Muslim attendees prepared to perform two of five daily prayers beneath a canopy in Oxford, in southwest Chester County. So went the gathering of more than 1,000 attendees in the Ahmadiyya Muslim Youth Association, a branch of the national Ahmadiyya Muslim Community.
NEWS
August 29, 2004 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Next year, students will have another high school option in Philadelphia, this one focusing on the study of peace. "In a city in which too many of our young people and families feel threatened by violence, it's time to study and practice peace," said Shelly Yanoff, executive director of Philadelphia Citizens for Children and Youth, whose group will serve on the school's advisory board. The idea to create a "peace school" came out of a discussion in which some groups, including PCCY, said they opposed the public school district's creation of a military high school.
NEWS
November 5, 1995 | REUTERS
The text of President Clinton's statement yesterday on the assassination of Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin: The world has lost one of its greatest men, a warrior for his nation's freedom and now a martyr for his nation's peace. To Leah Rabin and her children, Hillary and I send our love and our prayers. To the people of Israel, I want you to know that the hearts and prayers of all Americans are with you. Just as America has stood by you in moments of crisis and triumph, so now we all stand by you in this moment of grieving and loss.
NEWS
May 25, 1989 | By Cathy Davidson Kerr, Special to The Inquirer
The year was 1958; the world was in the throes of the Cold War, and the United States was already sending money and advisers to a place called Vietnam. At home, the civil-rights movement was building steam. And Marian Dockhorn was developing an idea that would be going strong when those events were written into the history books: Gather representatives of various peace groups in Bucks County, plan educational activities, throw in a little entertainment and something for the children to do, and call it a peace fair.
NEWS
June 4, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Charles Fox
Supporters of an end to the U.S. embargo of Cuba held a festival in Camden last night for the Ninth Cuban Friendship Caravan. The caravan, which is traveling from Canada to Cuba, is collecting donations for distribution on the island.
NEWS
July 13, 2000
One hundred years of enmity and struggle meet at this point in time. Behind me, far too many lie buried; there has been suffering and anguish on both sides because there is an unbearably high price not only to defeat but also to victory. The time has now come to put an end to the conflict, to give hope the flower of our youth, that they may flourish undisturbed. The time has come to take decisions and to bequeath a better future to our children, a different reality from that known by our parents' generations.
NEWS
December 17, 1999 | By Jay Rothman
When the going gets tough, good negotiators . . . sing an ARIA. On Wednesday, Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak and Syrian Foreign Minister Farouk al-Sharaa, sang their parts well. First they demonstrated sufficient Antagonism (the A in the ARIA) by not shaking hands, and decrying the other for their offenses. In this stage of negotiations, or really pre-negotiation, aggressive sentiments are packaged and presented primarily for at-home consumption. ("Ah, yes, our negotiator is representing us and our grievances well.
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