CollectionsPeaceable Kingdom
IN THE NEWS

Peaceable Kingdom

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 8, 1993 | BY STEFAN SCHINDLER
The path to a successful future resides partly in retracing our past; establishing deeper, more nourishing roots in a different history and mythology; redefining what we are, and the meaning of home and community. It is important to do this because modern American culture is impaled on the cross of its contradictions, and desperately needs a healing return to more fundamental values. This claim is where the political left and political right in America meet. It is a shared assumption, common ground.
NEWS
July 30, 1993 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The end is near: Tom and Jerry have been Barneyed. To Barney - a verb taken from the mawkish cartoon dinosaur - is to transform someone into a sap. Among the many sins of "Tom and Jerry: The Movie," the most offensive is the way it has Barneyed the famous cat and mouse antagonists. Tom and Jerry became movie and television idols because they were in perpetual conflict - cat chased mouse in a predator/prey ritual ordained by Nature herself, a ritual given harmless slapstick overtones by Hanna-Barbera animators.
NEWS
July 9, 1995 | By Robert F. O'Neill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's a bit of a stretch for Delaware County to lay any claim to Edward Hicks, perhaps America's foremost 19th-century primitive artist and creator of the celebrated Peaceable Kingdom series. After all, Hicks, a Quaker minister, didn't live in the county, isn't buried here, and, for all we know, may have never even visited. Even the two- sided swinging signboard he painted for the Washington House in Chester in 1844 is gone. Faced with hard times and concern over the sign's proper care, the Delaware County Historical Society sold what it considered its most prized holding for $50,000 in 1986.
NEWS
July 9, 1995 | By Robert F. O'Neill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's a bit of a stretch for Delaware County to lay any claim to Edward Hicks, perhaps America's foremost 19th-century primitive artist and creator of the celebrated Peaceable Kingdom series. After all, Hicks, a Quaker minister, didn't live in the county, isn't buried here, and, for all we know, may have never even visited. Even the two- sided swinging signboard he painted for the Washington House in Chester in 1844 is gone. Faced with hard times and concern over the sign's proper care, the Delaware County Historical Society sold what it considered its most prized holding for $50,000 in 1986.
NEWS
April 10, 2008 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The Fairmount Park Commission gave its blessing yesterday to a sprawling public sculpture by Tom Otterness that will transform the look and feel of Logan Square, one of Philadelphia's most iconic landscapes. Largely inspired by Edward Hicks' famous series of paintings The Peaceable Kingdom, Otterness' piece will consist of cast bronze groupings - large Lenape Indians meeting with diminutive Quakers, and gatherings of lions and lambs, oxen and wolves - set throughout what is known as Aviator Park, the underused acreage that stretches between the Franklin Institute, the Academy of Natural Sciences, and Alexander Calder's Swann Fountain.
NEWS
November 25, 1999 | By Alexis Moore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Peace is the daily priority at St. Francis de Sales School, in the heart of a multiethnic Southwest Philadelphia neighborhood dogged by violence. "Peace" at the Roman Catholic elementary school of 510 students from 26 nations can be as simple as holding doors for classmates. "Peace" can be as brave as breaking up or preventing fights. "Peace" can be as hard as talking out disputes at a table rather than picking up a rock on the playground. For seven years of modeling, teaching and celebrating nonviolence, the "Peace Program" of the school at 47th Street and Springfield Avenue was honored this month by the Philadelphia Bar Foundation.
LIVING
August 29, 1999 | By Ellen O'Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The heart-stopping images of kids fleeing Columbine High School. The bloody day-trading offices in Atlanta. The muzzle of a semiautomatic in the window of a blue Ford Taurus leaving Chicago. The screams at a day-care center in L.A. Each of the mass shootings that has erupted over the last half-year has had its own mad signature, and has prompted shock waves across the country. But some who study the nation's history see these tragedies as merely the latest chapter in America's long national story of violence.
NEWS
September 20, 1989 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer TV Critic
Tonight's television premieres may vary in quality, but at least they offer diversity. Peaceable Kingdom (Channel 10, 8 p.m.) is a family drama about a zookeeper; The Young Riders (Channel 6, 8:30 p.m.) chronicles the lives of a group of Pony Express riders, and The Nutt House (Channel 3, 9 p.m.) is a wacky sitcom devised by Mel Brooks. From its title on down, Peaceable Kingdom would seem like a real snooze- athon. After all, what could be more lulling than watching Lindsay Wagner presiding over lots of furry animals during the 8 p.m. family hour?
NEWS
October 9, 1999
If the Philadelphia Museum of Art wants to beef up attendance for the two fine special exhibitions opening tomorrow, here's a suggestion: Ask Mayor Rendell to denounce them. Guaranteed, there will be lines all the way back to City Hall. Just like those outside the Brooklyn Art Museum ever since New York Mayor Giuliani blasted a special exhibition there because he considers one of the paintings blasphemous. True, it's tough to find a religious icon in "Worldly Goods: The Arts of Early Pennsylvania" or in "The Kingdoms of Edward Hicks," but the many versions of Hicks' masterpiece, "Peaceable Kingdom," are as close as you're going to get to a Quaker icon (if that isn't a contradiction in terms)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1998 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Last year, the James A. Michener Art Museum in Doylestown enhanced its collection considerably when it acquired a portrait of Edward Hicks of Newtown, Bucks County, one of last century's most prominent self-taught painters. Hicks (1780-1849), a sign painter and leader in the Newtown Friends Meeting, is best known for the many paintings he made on the biblical theme of the Peaceable Kingdom. The newly acquired portrait, purchased from a New York dealer for $110,000, is one of three likenesses of Hicks painted by his younger cousin, Thomas Hicks (1823-90)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 24, 2013
By Neil Greenberg Welcome to my idyllic corner of the world, Cheltenham Township. What a cornucopia of affable diversity. We have all the requisite ethnic and religious groups, immigrants from everywhere, and all the possible family structures: traditional marriages, divorces and remarriages, single parents, two-mommy and two-daddy households - I mean everything. And it all works out pretty well. On the rare occasions when we need the police, they're here in two minutes. Ten years ago, when my son Griffin was at Cheltenham High and my daughter Julia was in second grade at Myers Elementary, I wrote about their contrasting social experiences in an Inquirer op-ed.
NEWS
April 21, 2013 | By Clark DeLeon
To hear John Connors tell the story, he just sort of got involved with saving Penn Treaty Park when he wore a younger man's clothes. He doesn't even know if the legend - William Penn made nice here with the original Philadelphians - actually happened in 1682 under a big elm tree on a bendy curve along the Delaware River. The famous treaty was more of a handshake, a pledge of goodwill and peaceful intentions between the recently arrived Englishman and the native Lenni Lenape whose ancestors had dwelled in these parts since 2500 B.C. Almost a century later, Voltaire described this unique understanding as "the only treaty never sworn to and never broken.
NEWS
October 11, 2011 | BY DAN GERINGER, geringd@phillynews.com 215-854-5961
NOW in its sixth nonviolent day outside City Hall, Occupy Philadelphia's tent village of hundreds who hope to cure society's ills has a steady flow of donated food, clothing and shelter - and seems to be settling in for the holidays. "We're 100 percent velvet, meaning peaceful," said Steve Ross of West Kensington, one of Occupy Philadelphia's many gentle, gung-ho organizers, who gave this reporter a tour of the sprawling settlement on Dilworth Plaza yesterday. "This dude lives in a tree," Ross said, stopping by a maple with a sleeping bag, a backpack, a supply hammock and an "Occupy the Trees" poster hanging from its branches.
NEWS
May 3, 2011 | By Cheryl Hall, Dallas Morning News
DALLAS - For Stan Richards, sleeping on the job is a winning proposition. The chief executive of the Richards Group, well-known for keeping a peaceable kingdom in the often stressed-out advertising world, has converted a little extra space at his agency into four nap rooms. "There's a lot of data that an early-afternoon or midafternoon nap will increase productivity and energize a person," said Richards, showing off his sleeping pads last week. "I never worry about whether I'm going to get a fair shake from the people who work here.
NEWS
September 26, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles E. Hankin, 62, a woodworker and sculptor, died of lung cancer Monday, Sept. 13, at his home in Montgomery Township. In 2001, he completed painting a Peaceable Kingdom mural on the side of a building at 3107 N. 10th St., near Clearfield Street. The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts sponsored it "as part of a series of murals on the peaceable kingdom theme," Amy Johnston, spokeswoman for the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program, wrote in an e-mail Tuesday. Mr. Hankin had a more intimate connection with the original than many who have worked on such murals.
NEWS
April 10, 2008 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The Fairmount Park Commission gave its blessing yesterday to a sprawling public sculpture by Tom Otterness that will transform the look and feel of Logan Square, one of Philadelphia's most iconic landscapes. Largely inspired by Edward Hicks' famous series of paintings The Peaceable Kingdom, Otterness' piece will consist of cast bronze groupings - large Lenape Indians meeting with diminutive Quakers, and gatherings of lions and lambs, oxen and wolves - set throughout what is known as Aviator Park, the underused acreage that stretches between the Franklin Institute, the Academy of Natural Sciences, and Alexander Calder's Swann Fountain.
NEWS
December 26, 2004 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
In the constellation of American folk artists we most admire, Edward Hicks (1780-1849) shines with an especially dazzling light. His most famous painting is Peaceable Kingdom, of which he painted about 60 variations. That remarkable picture features a lion lying down with a lamb (as described in the Book of Isaiah scriptural text), while in the distance William Penn signs a treaty with the Indians. This image by the Quaker artist from Newtown, Bucks County, is one of the best-loved of all American folk art subjects.
NEWS
October 1, 2003 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The cheerful, shared entrance to the New Jersey State Aquarium and the Camden Children's Garden belies the stormy partnership within. Since shortly after the garden opened in 1999, the two waterfront tourist attractions have been at fierce odds over how to split ticket revenue. The garden even sued the aquarium last year, claiming that it had been shortchanged, an allegation that the aquarium denies. Now, as a private operator prepares to take over and expand the aquarium, the feud is coming to a head.
NEWS
November 25, 1999 | By Alexis Moore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Peace is the daily priority at St. Francis de Sales School, in the heart of a multiethnic Southwest Philadelphia neighborhood dogged by violence. "Peace" at the Roman Catholic elementary school of 510 students from 26 nations can be as simple as holding doors for classmates. "Peace" can be as brave as breaking up or preventing fights. "Peace" can be as hard as talking out disputes at a table rather than picking up a rock on the playground. For seven years of modeling, teaching and celebrating nonviolence, the "Peace Program" of the school at 47th Street and Springfield Avenue was honored this month by the Philadelphia Bar Foundation.
NEWS
October 9, 1999
If the Philadelphia Museum of Art wants to beef up attendance for the two fine special exhibitions opening tomorrow, here's a suggestion: Ask Mayor Rendell to denounce them. Guaranteed, there will be lines all the way back to City Hall. Just like those outside the Brooklyn Art Museum ever since New York Mayor Giuliani blasted a special exhibition there because he considers one of the paintings blasphemous. True, it's tough to find a religious icon in "Worldly Goods: The Arts of Early Pennsylvania" or in "The Kingdoms of Edward Hicks," but the many versions of Hicks' masterpiece, "Peaceable Kingdom," are as close as you're going to get to a Quaker icon (if that isn't a contradiction in terms)
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|