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BUSINESS
December 12, 1990 | MICHAEL MERCANTI/DAILY NEWS
The first batch of winter fruit from Chile is offloaded yesterday at the Tioga Fruit Terminal on Delaware Avenue. The freighter Choapa, the first of about 120 ships scheduled to arrive this winter on the Delaware River, docked with 360,000 boxes of peaches, grapes, plums, nectarines and apricots. Delaware River ports receive about 70 percent of the winter fruit; the rest goes to Los Angeles.
NEWS
August 11, 1994 | By Nancy Lawson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Visitors can ride on a hay wagon or hop on a pony at Linvilla Orchards' annual Peach Festival Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. In the 100-year-old octagonal barn, visitors can sample peach pie, peach fudge, peach shortcake, peach butter and peach preserves. Hayrides will be $3 per person and will run from noon to 4 p.m. Pony rides also will be $3, and will run from noon to 3 p.m. There will be contests and games for the children, and folk music from noon to 3 p.m. for the whole family.
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
Out in the orchards, Steven Sokoloff of Ardmore reached up and plucked a large, ripe peach from a tree. "I had a peach tree as a kid," said Sokoloff, 40, as he put the fruit into a half-full cardboard box. "I'm coming back here to remember what it was like. " Sokoloff was one of hundreds of peach lovers who gathered at Linvilla Orchards in Middletown on Sunday for the annual peach festival and to pick their own fruit. Visitors of all ages piled into wagons for a hayride out to the orchards, where the fruit was plentiful.
NEWS
November 7, 1994 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Alfred S. Caltabiano Sr., 81, a Gloucester County peach grower who started farming during the Depression, died Friday at Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center in Camden. Born in the Catania province of Sicily, Mr. Caltabiano came to the United States with his family when he was just 3 years old; they settled in Philadelphia. As a young man, Mr. Caltabiano traveled from Philadelphia to South Jersey farms each summer to work cutting asparagus and picking tomatoes. In 1939 he purchased his 106-acre farm in Mullica Hill.
NEWS
August 30, 1986 | By Mary Jane Fine, Inquirer Staff Writer
August is drawing to a close and, already, the temperatures have dipped into the 50s once or twice at night, with a forecast for more of the same. Twilight is arriving earlier now to erase the long summer evenings, minute by subtle minute. Shop windows are showing wool. A few red leaves have intruded among the summer foliage on suburban lawns. And today, weather permitting, comes another undeniable harbinger of autumn: From 9 a.m. until noon, Linvilla Orchards' hay wagon will trundle pickers out into the peach fields for the season's final pick-it-yourself day. Next crop: pumpkins.
NEWS
July 20, 1986 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Peach pizza, peach pancakes, a Little Miss Peach contest and two peach runs are some of the features at the fourth annual Camden County Regional Peach Festival Saturday and next Sunday in Pennsauken. "Anything to do with peaches, we're going to do it," said Linda Butenis- Vorsa, festival treasurer. "Not a lot of people know New Jersey grows peaches," she said. In fact, New Jersey produced more peaches last year than Georgia, and is third in the nation in peach production. Camden County is the fourth largest peach producer in the state, with 2,500 of New Jersey's 14,000 peach-devoted acres, she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1987 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Anyone who joins one of those partnerships that invest in movies knows that there is a great deal of risk involved. For the hardy Irish souls who put up the money for Eat the Peach, there was also clear and present danger. The comedy, written by John Kelleher and Peter Ormrod and directed by the latter, was made on a set where a shoestring counted as a luxury. One way to save money was to round up visiting investors and invite them to play extras in their own movie. Since the enterprise that engages the film's two heroes is the building of a ramshackle wall-of-death in which they gun their motorcycles, the assignment turned out to be a little tougher than a normal day at the races.
NEWS
October 2, 2005 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Until two years ago, every peach that Santo Maccherone couldn't send to market cut into his profit margin. There was nothing wrong with the peaches - in fact, they were probably the best-tasting ones because they were perfectly ripe. But that also meant they couldn't be shipped without suffering bruises or turning overripe. "I was throwing out at least 10 percent, sometimes more, of the crop each year," said Maccherone, a third-generation farmer who owns Circle M Fruit Farms in Mullica Hill.
FOOD
July 26, 1987 | By Leslie Land, Special to The Inquirer
There seems to be some confusion about the exact identity of nectarines. Is they is or is they ain't a peach? Most cooking and gardening books agree with the Oxford English Dictionary, which defines them as "a variety of the common peach. " But Howard Hillman, in The Cook's Book, finds it most likely that "the peach and the nectarine did not spring one from the other but are both descendants of a common, now extinct, ancestor. " Botanically correct or not, the original name, "nectarine peach," is somewhat odd from the gastronomic point of view.
NEWS
March 11, 1997 | By David Wilson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Township police and U.S. Secret Service agents discovered three explosive devices in a former peach-packing warehouse last night near the Echo Plaza shopping center off Hurffville-Cross Keys Road. No injuries were reported. Deputy Police Chief Jim Murphy said investigators went into the warehouse, which is across Fries Mill Road from Echo Plaza, with a search warrant for explosives at 7 p.m. Murphy said he did not immediately know the type of explosives found, except that they were "dangerous ones" and that other materials that might have been used to make bombs also were discovered.
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BUSINESS
January 22, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a review on the play, The Inquirer's call on which is the tallest U.S. building between Manhattan and Chicago stands corrected. Apologies to civic boosters in Atlanta . . . and readers in Philadelphia. Since the first Comcast employees occupied the Comcast Center in 2008, the newspaper has referenced the cable-TV company's headquarters, an A.M. Stern-designed 974-foot skyscraper, as the tallest U.S. building between Manhattan and Chicago. Oops. That would be true - if the United States' southern border ended at South Carolina.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2013
1PINEAPPLES Chock-full of vitamin C, with a whopping 65 percent of the daily recommendation in a 40-calorie half-cup serving. Pay attention to portions, though: Even that half-cup serving has 16 grams of naturally occurring sugars. 2 MANGOES A good source of vitamins A and C, with less sugar than pineapples. A half-cup serving is about 55 calories with 12 grams of sugar. 3 CANTALOUPE A great summer breakfast, this fleshy fruit is also full of vitamins A and C, with only 30 calories per half-cup serving.
FOOD
May 23, 2013
Faux Pho . . . 3 Netta's Chicken and Rice . . . 2 Peach and Yellow Tomato Pie . . . 2 Village Whiskey Veggie Burger . . . 4 Vintage Wine Bar Veggie Burger . . . 4
NEWS
October 1, 2012 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Sometimes the stars align, and sometimes they collide. And sometimes they do both at once. We begin when Daughter Francesca and I get invited to speak at the National Book Festival in Washington, D.C., about our coming collection of the columns, which is titled Meet Me at Emotional Baggage Claim . Francesca thought of the title, which is very funny unless you happen to be the emotional baggage. That would be me. I don't mind being her emotional baggage. On the contrary, I like being a big heavy thing she totes around, like a guilt backpack.
FOOD
September 13, 2012
Excerpts from Craig LaBan's online chat Tuesday: Good afternoon, my hungry friends, and welcome back to our weekly romp through the edible and drinkable wonders of Philly's food scene. Congrats to Christina Wilson, the ex-Mercato chef and South Philly resident who won Hell's Kitchen last night. I despise the show, but it sounds like she actually got a real job out of it (executive chef at Gordon Ramsay Steak at the Paris hotel in Las Vegas), so hats off to her for enduring the gauntlet of reality TV to get there.
NEWS
August 10, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
Ethel L. Brooks had a strong urge to take Allen Iverson over her knee.   Ethel was a devoted 76ers fan, one of those enthusiasts who know all the players and statistics, and she didn't like the way the brilliant but controversial guard treated her team. Such inexcusable behavior, running off to the Denver Nuggets, the Detroit Pistons, and some team in Turkey! "I wish I was his grandmother," she once said. "I'd knock some sense into him. " Ethel met Iverson once, at a casino in Atlantic City, but that was before the controversy, and he couldn't have been nicer to her, her family said.
FOOD
August 9, 2012
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat: Craig LaBan: I've been loving all summer produce that's around us this time of year, and took the family peach picking in Jersey, at Conte Farms in Tabernacle. I did my best to put a dent in the 22 pounds of ripe fruit we picked (in 10 minutes!) before the tractor returned. Reader: Where is the best place in Philadelphia to get artisan cheeses? My friends suggest I move to Bucks County, where I will be a short train ride away from Brooklyn where they have the best artisan cheeses.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Snow had fallen by Halloween; in effect, spring arrived by Christmas, and the blossoms were popping by Easter. And despite the atmosphere's recent flirtations with quasi-normality, the seasonal fast-forwarding trend has continued briskly in the Philadelphia region's farms and fields, where veteran observers report that the annual bounty of summer fruits and vegetables is a full week to two weeks ahead of schedule. Even better, one weather service says the summer could pass without a heat wave.
NEWS
October 2, 2011 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
You would think that if you live alone, you get to be the boss. As in, you're not the boss of me. Because now that it's only me, I should be the boss of me. In fact, I'm self-employed, so I am, literally, my own boss. But that's just literally, or maybe for tax purposes, but not in real life. In real life, my dogs are the boss of me. And my cats are my slave masters. I realized this a moment ago, when I was working on my laptop, with two dogs sleeping on either side, Peach and Little Tony, each with its head on my lap. I like to work with the TV on, and some horrible show came on, but I couldn't reach the remote to change the channel without waking up Little Tony.
FOOD
September 1, 2011 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Labor Day weekend brings the end of summer, with cool September breezes a welcome relief from muggy, 100-degree days. Still, it's bittersweet to say goodbye to the season. But, as in autumn, when leaves turn most brilliant just before winter, summer offers a sweet finale - fuzzy, juicy peaches. Delicate and ephemeral, peaches are a perfect way to end summer. Their easily bruised flesh doesn't travel well, and their sticky sweetness quickly overripens to leave a soggy mess and a kitchen full of hovering fruit flies.
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