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Peaks And Valleys

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Slow-moving and sly, Everyone Else , from the German director Maren Ade, dissects a relationship between a man and a woman on vacation in Sardinia in ways that are both stunningly perceptive and a little frightening, too. Chris (Lars Eidinger) is a talented but still struggling architect whose mother has lent him her house in the rocky hills of the idyllic Italian isle. Gitti (Birgit Minichmayr) is a music-biz publicist who comes across as flaky, a little off. For the first half of Ade's sharply observed piece, the young couple eat, sleep, make love, argue, reconcile, argue, reconcile.
SPORTS
February 16, 2015
Maikel Franco's 2014 season at triple-A Lehigh Valley was one of peaks and valleys. Period   G   AB   H   2B   3B   HR   BB   Avg.   OPS    April 3-22   18   67   9   2   0   0   6   .134   .380    April 23-May 19   23   91   29   8   0   4   11   .319   .937    May 20-June 29   37   144   25   6   1   1   6   .174   .454    ...
SPORTS
September 18, 1995 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Top-seeded Thomas Muster won his 11th title of the season yesterday, breaking the ATP Tour record set by Pete Sampras last year with a 6-3, 6-4 victory over fellow Austrian Gilbert Schaller in the final of the $1.38 million Romanian Open at Bucharest. Muster, 27, ranked third in the world, needed 1 hour, 11 minutes to beat Schaller. It was Muster's 15th consecutive victory on clay. Schaller, 26, was ranked sixth in the tournament and 25th by ATP. Yaya Doumbia of Senegal became the first pro player to win two tournaments as a qualifier when he beat No. 7 seed Jakob Hlasek of Switzerland, 6-4, 6-4, in the final of the Passing Shot tournament at Bordeaux, France.
NEWS
March 2, 1994 | By Bill Doherty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Upper Darby High football coach Jack Shingle, the man who rebuilt the Royals' program, handed in his letter of resignation Monday. "I'm just physically and emotionally tired," said Shingle, who was 44-32-2 in his seven-year tenure at Upper Darby. "It's just time to hand the ball off to the next coach, which in my opinion should be (assistant coach) Rich Gentile. Rich played at Upper Darby and came back and helped us build the program back up here. "But right now it's just time for me to unplug, time to take some time off. " When Shingle took over as Upper Darby's football coach in 1987, there were 18 players on the team.
NEWS
February 16, 1988 | By RENEE V. LUCAS, Daily News Staff Writer
"One Acre At A Time," first mounted at New Freedom Theatre in honor of the Bicentennial, has been dusted off again for Black History Month. "One Acre" is a journey through African-American history using music, vignettes, speeches, essays and other writings. Like any journey, it has memorable moments and more forgettable ones. The music - spirituals, gospel, jazz and blues - is excellent, from the tight three-piece band (pianist Jeffrey Newton, bassist Lonnie Henson and drummer Amir Abdulla)
FOOD
January 9, 1994 | By Kim Pierce, FOR THE INQUIRER
As it turns out, grazing wasn't just another faddish way to munch through the self-absorbed '80s. Increasingly, research shows that several small meals a day may be better than three squares. This way of eating: Lowers cholesterol. Smooths out blood-sugar peaks and valleys. May make weight loss easier. "It may have great importance for heart disease," says Dr. David Jenkins, a University of Toronto researcher who has done extensive work on how nibbling lowers cholesterol.
SPORTS
March 23, 2009 | By Kate Fagan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like the 76ers this season, Lou Williams has experienced some peaks and valleys. Right now, though, the Sixers' spark-plug reserve guard is at a peak: In the last three games entering last night, he was averaging 19.7 points, and in the last seven, he was making 40 percent of his shots. (He had shot 33.7 percent in his previous 18 games.) "We know it's going to be a long trip," Williams said before last night's game against the Sacramento Kings, the fourth stop of a five-game Western swing.
SPORTS
August 11, 1997 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Wearing a plaid, open-necked sports shirt, Dave Montgomery sat in the Phillies' dugout. Somewhat reclusive since taking over as club president on June 20, he had agreed to meet with reporters before yesterday afternoon's game at Busch Stadium. The topics were the futures of the radical realignment proposal and general manager Lee Thomas. Montgomery is an ardent supporter of the former but was considerably more ambiguous about the latter. On the proposal that would have more than a dozen teams, including the Phillies, change leagues, he argued that the benefits - primarily in scheduling, travel and television - far outweigh the disadvantages.
NEWS
January 16, 1990 | By Jeremy Treatman, Special to The Inquirer
They call it the Princeton offense. Ridley's spread-the-floor offensive set is designed to provide open jump shots or cutaways to the basket. And right now that two-pronged offense is working wonders for Green Raiders coach John DiGregorio. In its latest Central League conquest, Ridley (9-2 overall, 6-1 league) did virtually anything it wanted to in an easy 67-37 win over visiting Conestoga (8-5, 5-2) Friday night. "I got the offense from going to Princeton about 10 times in the off- season and talking with coach Pete Carrill," said DiGregorio.
NEWS
March 2, 1993 | By Mac Daniel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The number of homicides was down substantially last year in the Pennsylvania suburbs. But local law enforcement officials say they doubt the drop is indicative of any long-term trend. And the early evidence from this year suggests they may be right. Forty-seven people were slain in 1992 in Bucks, Chester, Delaware and Montgomery Counties, according to the district attorneys, police and coroners in the four counties. That number is down from 65 the year before, an overall drop of 28 percent.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Chamber music power duos - alliances between musicians you'd normally hear as concerto soloists with the Philadelphia Orchestra - typically converge amid their busy careers, almost like airplanes refueling in mid-flight, to refresh and redefine the most substantial masterpieces of the repertoire. That's why the concert by violinist Lisa Batiashvili and pianist Paul Lewis on Wednesday night at the Kimmel Center, a presentation of the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, seemed odd. In choosing less notable works by Schubert and Telemann, they almost certainly held some secret to the music that has eluded others.
SPORTS
February 16, 2015
Maikel Franco's 2014 season at triple-A Lehigh Valley was one of peaks and valleys. Period   G   AB   H   2B   3B   HR   BB   Avg.   OPS    April 3-22   18   67   9   2   0   0   6   .134   .380    April 23-May 19   23   91   29   8   0   4   11   .319   .937    May 20-June 29   37   144   25   6   1   1   6   .174   .454    ...
NEWS
December 8, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Conductor David Charles Abell is far too urbane to be a musical Santa Claus at the Philly Pops Christmas Spectacular, now running at the Kimmel Center. But pops, classical, and theater music are all of a piece in the life of this 56-year-old conductor who grew up in Mount Airy, graduated from Germantown Friends School ('76), studied with Leonard Bernstein, and is based in London, where he conducts an array of concerts and West End shows. Q: Christmas concerts can be so many things to so many people.
SPORTS
January 16, 2012 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
NASHVILLE - Flyers center Claude Giroux has blossomed into one of the NHL's elite players, but he is trying to get through his first prolonged slump of the season. Maybe he's trying too hard. You can hear the disappointment in his voice after games. You can see his frustration as he slams his gloves on the bench after a goal-less shift. Giroux, an ultra-intense competitor, has one goal in his last 10 games. "It's not really about the stats, it's that I know I can play better," Giroux said after he and his line mates, Scott Hartnell and Jaromir Jagr, were shut down by defensemen Shea Weber and Ryan Suter in Saturday's 4-2 loss in Nashville.
SPORTS
January 29, 2011 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doug Collins kept looking for answers. All the 76ers coach saw Friday night were turnovers. The Sixers suffered one of their most devastating defeats in a game that had as many peaks and valleys as their season. Leading by 21 points with fewer than four minutes to go in the third quarter, the Sixers suffered a fourth-quarter meltdown in a 99-94 loss to the Memphis Grizzlies in front of 14,289 stunned fans at the Wells Fargo Center. "We had complete control of the game," Collins said.
SPORTS
September 29, 2010
JAYSON WERTH has made a strange trip through the 2010 regular season. A normal baseball season for most major league players is a succession of peaks and valleys, hot streaks and slumps. But the Phillies rightfielder has bookended a dramatic start, where it appeared he would blow away the all-time record for doubles, with a dynamic finish. In between? Not so much . . . His April was a shock in itself. During spring training, Werth's at-bats resembled a guy warming up for the Phillies' midwinter Clearwater fantasy camp.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Slow-moving and sly, Everyone Else , from the German director Maren Ade, dissects a relationship between a man and a woman on vacation in Sardinia in ways that are both stunningly perceptive and a little frightening, too. Chris (Lars Eidinger) is a talented but still struggling architect whose mother has lent him her house in the rocky hills of the idyllic Italian isle. Gitti (Birgit Minichmayr) is a music-biz publicist who comes across as flaky, a little off. For the first half of Ade's sharply observed piece, the young couple eat, sleep, make love, argue, reconcile, argue, reconcile.
NEWS
June 4, 2010 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
John Wooden, college basketball's gentlemanly Wizard of Westwood who built one of the greatest dynasties in all of sports at UCLA and became one of the most revered coaches ever, has died. He was 99. The university said Wooden died Friday night of natural causes at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, where he had been hospitalized since May 26. With his signature rolled-up game program in hand, Wooden led the Bruins to 10 NCAA championships, including an unmatched streak of seven in a row from 1967 to 1973.
NEWS
January 29, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Though John Adams is among America's most-performed living composers, he's underrepresented here, perhaps because he writes big, expensive-to-produce works that aren't likely to be good-enough box office unless the community has a long-standing relationship with his music. So when the St. Lawrence Quartet's Wednesday program, presented by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society at the Kimmel Center, featured Adams' 2008 String Quartet, one anticipated it with particular speculation: What would this most maximal of postminimalist composers do in a rigorous, small-scale medium?
SPORTS
October 13, 2009 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The baseball old-timers say you can't get too high or low. You've got to find a comfortable plateau and avoid the peaks and valleys. Tell that to the Phillies' relievers. In less than 24 hours, as their team won two games here to clinch their National League division series, the back end of the Phillies' bullpen had more emotional swings than Sammy Sosa. Before, during, and after his two performances, Ryan Madson was up and down and up again, much like the best and worst of his pitches.
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