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Peanut Chews

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NEWS
October 16, 2013 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carl A. Goldenberg, 85, of Center City, who continued his family's legacy of making Goldenberg's Peanut Chews, died Monday, Oct. 14, of prostate cancer at his home. Mr. Goldenberg was the first member of the third generation in his family to operate Goldenberg Candy Co. The business was started in 1890 by his grandfather David, a Romanian immigrant, as a small candy store on Frankford Avenue. "That was Dad's calling - to go into the family business," said his son, David, the last Goldenberg to be president of Goldenberg Candy Co. "It was very important to him because his name was on the package.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2006 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They roll off the line, up to two million pieces per day, 45 million calories per shift. Peanut Chews - sweet, stiff sticks of molasses and peanuts wrapped in a chocolate-flavored coating - have been in production in Philadelphia since 1917. A strictly regional confection for most of the time since it was developed as a World War I ration bar by candy-maker Harry Goldenberg, Peanut Chews became available to sweet teeth in all 50 states earlier this year. Just Born Inc., the Bethlehem, Pa., maker of Marshmallow Peeps and Mike and Ike candies, bought out the Goldenberg family in 2003 to get a bite at the $4.4 billion U.S. chocolate-candy market, and is now looking to expand in foreign markets.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2005 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the new owner of Peanut Chews said last fall that it was tweaking the candy for a national launch this month - making it a little softer, a little less sticky - diehard fans were aghast. The 87-year-old candy was "sacred and should not be tampered with," Center City worker Rob Formica said at the time. But with the moment now upon us - national distribution of the new Peanut Chews begins Monday - it appears those concerns may have been overblown. Even Formica is satisfied.
NEWS
July 9, 2010
The confectioner that makes Peeps and Hot Tamales candies has reached a three-year agreement with the union representing workers at its operations in Bethlehem. Privately owned Just Born Inc. and Local 6 of the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers' and Grain Millers' union would not disclose terms of the contract, which covers 337 employees. But Barry Fields, president of the local, said there were increases in wages and pension benefits. Just Born, which is based in Bethlehem and takes its name from founder Sam Born, bought Goldenberg Candy Co. of Philadelphia in 2003.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1988 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
Newfoundland: remote and rocky, a land of short summers and long fogs. The kind of place where a Goldenberg's Peanut Chew could sure help a person make it through the day. Which might explain why Newfoundland has one of the world's highest per- capita consumptions of Peanut Chews. Philadelphia's Goldenberg Candy Co. ships about 240,000 Peanut Chews bars to Newfoundland each year, enough for two-fifths of the province's population to have one apiece. It's not clear why Peanut Chews are so popular in Newfoundland (a recent foray into three Philadelphia luncheonettes turned up none at all)
NEWS
July 7, 1988 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
A naked Goldenberg Peanut Chew is not a pretty sight. Especially when it's floating down the middle of the street amid an assortment of debris on a bitter journey to the nearest sewer. That's where hundreds of the chocolate- and caramel-covered candy treats wound up during a four-alarm fire that gutted the Goldenberg Candy Co. factory, on Wyoming Avenue near Mascher Street, yesterday. The blaze, which was reported at 9:38 a.m. and declared under control at 11:50 a.m., may have been started accidentally by roofers repairing a section of the roof of the one-story building, said Fire Commissioner William C. Richmond.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1990 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Independence Day is barely over, but the Goldenberg family is firmly focused on Halloween. Halloween is a high holiday for the candy business, but this year's should be particularly sweet for the Goldenberg Candy Co. Last year, Halloween sales were below normal, although they were immeasurably improved over 1988. That's because two years ago tomorrow on a record hot day a fire that caused more than $5 million in damage destroyed about half the 40,000-square- foot Wyoming Avenue plant where the Goldenberg family produces its chocolate-covered Peanut Chews.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1988 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
A few days after a fire gutted much of the Goldenberg Candy Co.'s Philadelphia plant, Carl Goldenberg got a rather unusual sympathy call. It was from Joseph Viviano, president of Hershey Chocolate USA, a rival company that dwarfs Goldenberg, maker of just one type of candy, the Peanut Chew. Viviano offered to let the Goldenberg family use Hershey's Canadian plant to make the Chews until the family rebuilds its factory. It's the kind of gesture that softened the blow of seeing much of the family business destroyed in a fire almost three weeks ago The Goldenbergs say they have received an outpouring of offers of help since the fire - from friends, vendors, distributors, as well as competitors offering to lend everything from packaging equipment to storage space - to help get production running again.
NEWS
July 7, 1988 | By Thomas Ferrick Jr. and Robert J. Terry, Inquirer Staff Writers
A four-alarm fire yesterday damaged a portion of the Feltonville plant of the Goldenberg Candy Co., maker of Peanut Chews and Chew-ets. No one was injured in the blaze. The factory had shut down Friday for a two-week break, taken each year at this time, so only 17 employees were in the building, according to Carl Goldenberg, one of the owners of the family business. Fire officials said the fire began on the roof of the plant in the 100 block of West Wyoming Avenue shortly after 9:30 a.m. Fire Commissioner William C. Richmond directed the 115 firefighters with 30 pieces of equipment on the scene.
NEWS
April 28, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eugene B. Goldenberg, 78, of Northeast Philadelphia, a former wholesale seafood dealer who later worked as a police officer for the Defense Department, died Wednesday, April 24, of complications of dementia at Sierra Oaks of Bensalem. Mr. Goldenberg was known throughout the city as "the Candy Man" because he always passed out candy - especially Goldenberg's Peanut Chews, a Philadelphia favorite made in the Northeast. Despite his name, he had no relation to the company. In the 1960s, Mr. Goldenberg founded Delaware Sea Food Co., a wholesale seafood dealership at the Food Distribution Center on Lawrence Street in South Philadelphia.
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NEWS
October 16, 2013 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carl A. Goldenberg, 85, of Center City, who continued his family's legacy of making Goldenberg's Peanut Chews, died Monday, Oct. 14, of prostate cancer at his home. Mr. Goldenberg was the first member of the third generation in his family to operate Goldenberg Candy Co. The business was started in 1890 by his grandfather David, a Romanian immigrant, as a small candy store on Frankford Avenue. "That was Dad's calling - to go into the family business," said his son, David, the last Goldenberg to be president of Goldenberg Candy Co. "It was very important to him because his name was on the package.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
It was a night for new identities on Monday as Boot & Saddle, the long-shuttered former dive bar on South Broad Street, reopened in its new incarnation as a live music venue. The iconic boot-and-saddle neon sign has been dark for 17 years, but it continues to promise that "Country & Western" music will be heard inside. That will be the case, as bluegrass band the Highwater Preachers top an all-local bill on Wednesday night. But the room, capacity 175, will mainly be an indie-rock venue.
NEWS
April 28, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eugene B. Goldenberg, 78, of Northeast Philadelphia, a former wholesale seafood dealer who later worked as a police officer for the Defense Department, died Wednesday, April 24, of complications of dementia at Sierra Oaks of Bensalem. Mr. Goldenberg was known throughout the city as "the Candy Man" because he always passed out candy - especially Goldenberg's Peanut Chews, a Philadelphia favorite made in the Northeast. Despite his name, he had no relation to the company. In the 1960s, Mr. Goldenberg founded Delaware Sea Food Co., a wholesale seafood dealership at the Food Distribution Center on Lawrence Street in South Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2012
Food: Handmade ice cream in unconventional flavors. Earl Grey Srichacha sounds like a bad idea. We assure you, it is not. There are usually six flavors, three Philadelphia-style (with 16 percent butterfat cream from Trickling Springs Creamery in Chambersburg) and three nondairy. Who's behind it? Founded one year ago by Pete Angevine, Martin Brown and Jeffrey Ziga. What's in that name? Ziga says: "It sprang out of the ether. It's emotional. I'm a little baby, you're a little baby.
NEWS
December 26, 2011 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Staff Writer
Goldenberg's Peanut Chews are back. Not that they ever really left, but some candy lovers certainly thought the chocolate and peanut candy brand had disappeared, judging by postings on various blogs about the sweet stuff. Now the company that bought Goldenberg Candy Co. in 2003 is going all out to raise its profile in the land of cheesesteaks, Tastykakes, and other guilty pleasures. Just Born Inc., which had dreams of taking Peanut Chews national, has decided to retrench and remind customers in its core Mid-Atlantic market of the treat that has been made in Philadelphia since 1917.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Was I the last to hear that Bill Clinton had gone vegan? From the Golden Arches to golden beets in a single bound. Who says we are forever deaf to the pleas of our better angels? Of course, the former fast-foodie-in-chief isn't out there all alone. Steve Wynn, the casino mogul, and Mort Zuckerman, the magazine mogul; actor Alec Baldwin, and, so it says in a piece on "The Rise of the Power Vegans" in this month's Bloomberg Businessweek, is, yup, Mike Tyson. ( Yo , you got a problem with that?
NEWS
July 29, 2010 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
ESPN Deportes Radio, the national Spanish-language sports radio network, has secured a local affiliate, effective 6 a.m. Monday. It's WWDB-AM (860), whose stock in trade has been money-talk shows. 'DB owner Beasley Broadcast also added ESPN Deportes on stations in Atlanta and Boston in a package deal that shut out ESPN's English-language partner in Philadelphia, Greater Media, which broadcasts sports talk at 950 AM and 97.5 FM. Natalie Conner , who heads Beasley's Philly operations, says she will use the network feed but plans live and local programming, as well as tie-ins to the Latino community and local sports teams.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2010
Adsum (700 S. 5th St., 267-888-7002), neighborhood bistro is up and serving "progressive cuisine" by Chef Matt Levin (late of Lacroix). Adsum (pronounced "ahd-SOOM"; it's Latin for "I am here") is his first effort as a chef-owner. Co-owner is Kar Vivekananthan, an entrepreneur and communications-systems designer. Farm to Fork Week continues through Saturday, as 33 restaurants in the SJ HOT Chefs group offer four-course dinners for $35 and $25, featuring ingredients from New Jersey farms.
NEWS
July 9, 2010
The confectioner that makes Peeps and Hot Tamales candies has reached a three-year agreement with the union representing workers at its operations in Bethlehem. Privately owned Just Born Inc. and Local 6 of the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers' and Grain Millers' union would not disclose terms of the contract, which covers 337 employees. But Barry Fields, president of the local, said there were increases in wages and pension benefits. Just Born, which is based in Bethlehem and takes its name from founder Sam Born, bought Goldenberg Candy Co. of Philadelphia in 2003.
SPORTS
July 6, 2009
We're renaming this "Talkin' Sense" this week since Gonzodud is on vacation (although how we will tell he's on vacation is anyone's guess). I was appalled on Saturday when Fox kept cutting away or small-screening the Phils-Mets game to give extra-special coverage to the at-bats of Manny Ramirez, noted dope cheater just returned from suspension. I was in the press box and the Fox feed was on the monitors. You couldn't see the replays of the Phils' game because Pajama Man was all over the thing.
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