CollectionsPearl Necklace
IN THE NEWS

Pearl Necklace

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2009 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
To be sure, New York's art scene - with its clad-in-black gallerists, its attitudinal hangers-on, its moneyed collectors, and most of all, its variously self-promoting, insecure, insufferable artists - is ripe for movie satire. (Untitled) , however, is not that movie, not that satire. Starring a brooding Adam Goldberg as a composer of new (and extremely dissonant, listener-unfriendly) music and Marley Shelton as a fashionably bespectacled gallery owner, the film veers between cutting parody and cliche, threatening to become interesting at any moment, but never quite doing so. Goldberg's scowling Adrian leads a trio of musicians through a jolting cacophony of pieces written for piano, reeds, and percussion - and the percussion includes clanging buckets, crumpled paper, and breaking glass.
NEWS
March 14, 1997 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Is shopping a science? Maybe not, but the gift shop attached to the current "China: Ancient Arts and Sciences" exhibit at the Franklin Institute is one of the hottest attractions in the museum these days. "When the shop first opened last month," reported Debbie Gross, Franklin Institute director of retail sales, "we thought we'd ordered enough goods to last a month, but it sold in a week - 120 toy pandas sold in two days. Our highest-priced item - a $1,000 pearl necklace - was sold the first day. " Apparently, Franklin Institute visitors feel nothing could be finah than an item made in China . . . from pencils to chopsticks, from brush-painting kits to opera masks ("very popular with young boys," said store manager Ruth Seel)
NEWS
December 15, 1993 | By Laurent Sacharoff, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A four-block trail of blood left between two attempted break-ins in early November helped police catch a suspect they say is responsible for at least 10 burglaries or attempted break-ins in the last six months. But the suspect will probably not be charged with most of the incidents if he follows court orders, police said yesterday. Police charged Ralph Muccie, 32, of the 100 block of Hilltop Street, Bordentown City, with one count of burglary and theft Friday after a bloodhound tracked him to his home from a burglarized house 300 yards away in the 100 block of Prince Street, police said.
NEWS
May 3, 1996 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
The days of Camelot are starting to look a lot like Cameloot. People are using items purchased at the recent Sotheby's auction not as keepsakes of an era gone by, but as investments. Comedienne Joan Rivers, for example, spent $11,000 to buy a modest painting of a tree and shortly thereafter announced she planned to have silk scarves made in the same design to be sold on the QVC shopping channel. "The crass commercialism didn't start with me," snapped Rivers to an interviewer who apparently was shocked that anyone might want to make money out of Jackie Kennedy Onassis memorabilia.
NEWS
February 6, 1986 | By KURT HEINE, Daily News Staff Writer
Ocean County businessman Robert O. Marshall didn't want to be shot or struck on the head too hard by the hit man he hired to kill his wife because he feared it might leave him a brain-damaged "idiot for the rest of his life," said the star witness in Marshall's murder trial yesterday. In discussing how they would make the Garden State Parkway murder of Maria Marshall appear like a random highway robbery, former Louisiana sheriff's deputy Billy Wayne McKinnon said he and accused trigger man Larry N. Thompson thought Robert Marshall should be shot in the leg or arm. "I told him (Marshall)
NEWS
July 2, 2003 | By Thane Tierney
It's high noon in the record business, and the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), playing the Gary Cooper role, is squaring up against the users of KaZaA, Grokster, Gnutella, Aimster, Morpheus, and other online file traders, cast as the outlaw gang. The shootout will take place not on a dusty backlot Western set - but in a variety of courtrooms throughout the United States. And much like the climax to the classic movie, no one wants to be there, but duty calls. As I logged onto KaZaA while writing this article, 4,172,586 users online offered 851,780,205 files.
NEWS
July 3, 1997 | This report was compiled by Inquirer correspondent Wendy Walker
Unless otherwise attributed, the following reports are based on the statements of local police. Coatesville A diamond ring and $200 were reported stolen Friday from the home of a 74-year-old woman in the 300 block of Madison Street. Police said two men approached the woman about 3 p.m., said they were in the roof-repair business and told her some of her shingles needed to be replaced. One of the men asked her for a bucket of hot water so he could test the roof for leaks.
NEWS
January 16, 1986 | By Ginny Wiegand, Inquirer Staff Writer
The slaying early this month of an Abington doctor brought together this week more than 300 people - some angry, many frustrated and most of them frightened. They gathered Tuesday at Rydal Elementary School to learn from township and county officials what they could do to prevent more crime in their affluent area. According to the 1980 U.S. Census, the Rydal/Meadowbrook section of Abington has houses with a median value of $90,000 - the most expensive in the township. But to think that crime could happen there shattered some residents' illusions.
NEWS
January 16, 1986 | By KURT HEINE, Daily News Staff Writer (Staff writers Gloria Campisi and Scott Flander also contributed to this report.)
One of two West Philadelphia men charged yesterday with the New Year's Day slaying of a prominent doctor said he shot the man because he ordered the two intruders to "get the hell out of my house," a friend of the suspect told police. Police said David Steward, of 57th Street near Master, told his friend 10 hours after the slaying of Dr. Michael Groll that he and his cousin, Christopher Briggman, 24, of 56th Street near Westminster, didn't think anyone was home when they broke into Groll's sprawling rancher in the Rydal section of Abington Township.
NEWS
April 26, 1996 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This article contains information from Inquirer wire services
A set of John F. Kennedy's golf clubs sold for $772,500. One of Jackie Kennedy Onassis' riding saddles drew $90,500. Ashtrays, earrings and candy dishes went for dizzying prices. It was Day 3 of the liquidation of Camelot, and there wasn't a bargain in sight. Since it began Tuesday night, the four-day auction of Onassis' estate has produced a frenzy at Sotheby's Auction House in New York City. By the time the sale ends today, Sotheby's expects to have sold catalogs to 100,000 people considering a bid for a tangible connection with history.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
October 28, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
It's a sweltering summer evening in New York. A man with his leg in a cast is asleep in his wheelchair, oblivious to the din outside. He awakens to find a young woman, blond, with bright blue eyes, standing over him, red lipstick, a string of pearls around her neck, in the most elegant of black and white gowns. She plants a kiss on his lips. Is she a dream? An apparition? No, simply Grace Kelly, making her entrance in Alfred Hitchcock's Rear Window , asking James Stewart - as the hobbled photojournalist soon to believe he has witnessed a murder - how his leg is ("Hurts a little")
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2009 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
To be sure, New York's art scene - with its clad-in-black gallerists, its attitudinal hangers-on, its moneyed collectors, and most of all, its variously self-promoting, insecure, insufferable artists - is ripe for movie satire. (Untitled) , however, is not that movie, not that satire. Starring a brooding Adam Goldberg as a composer of new (and extremely dissonant, listener-unfriendly) music and Marley Shelton as a fashionably bespectacled gallery owner, the film veers between cutting parody and cliche, threatening to become interesting at any moment, but never quite doing so. Goldberg's scowling Adrian leads a trio of musicians through a jolting cacophony of pieces written for piano, reeds, and percussion - and the percussion includes clanging buckets, crumpled paper, and breaking glass.
NEWS
April 17, 2005 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ever since the Magi delivered those epochal baby gifts, the tradition of celebrating birth with a shower of presents has been evolving. Along the way from myrrh to Tommy Hilfiger layettes, the tradition has lost some of its soul. Today, a baby shower is as much commercial venture as social ritual. And with 21 percent of all babies in this country delivered by caesarean section last year, childbirth itself has become a medical procedure, detached from what some mothers say can be a transcendent spiritual experience.
NEWS
July 2, 2003 | By Thane Tierney
It's high noon in the record business, and the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), playing the Gary Cooper role, is squaring up against the users of KaZaA, Grokster, Gnutella, Aimster, Morpheus, and other online file traders, cast as the outlaw gang. The shootout will take place not on a dusty backlot Western set - but in a variety of courtrooms throughout the United States. And much like the climax to the classic movie, no one wants to be there, but duty calls. As I logged onto KaZaA while writing this article, 4,172,586 users online offered 851,780,205 files.
NEWS
December 3, 2000 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yeah, yeah, the Great Wall is great, the Forbidden City forbidding, and the Temple of Heaven heavenly. But fess up: One of the real delights of China is shopping. It's impossible to travel the New Silk Road without buying at least one thoroughly unnecessary memento. So why resist? Succumb. Maybe pick up a finely knotted silk carpet as smooth as a leopard skin? Or a cloisonne vase of enamel and gold? Or strands of blushing pearls? Or perhaps decadent cashmere long underwear?
NEWS
April 16, 1999 | This report was compiled by Inquirer suburban staff writers Blair Clarkson, Andrew Rice and Stephanie Stanley
Unless otherwise attributed, the following reports are based on the statements of local police. Haverford Robbery and aggravated assault charges were filed against three 17-year-olds arrested April 6 and 7 in connection with an armed robbery at the Beechwood-Brookline stop of the Norristown High Speed line on April 3. A 16-year-old resident of the 700 block of Beechwood Road reported that at about 4 p.m. that day, three males approached him...
LIVING
March 2, 1999 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The members of the Christian Ladies Book Club of the Hopewell United Methodist Church in Downingtown, who range in age from 41 to 78, like a little romance. So they're big on Barbara Taylor Bradford, the British-born mega-author who has sold 60 million books in the last 20 years. From her first - A Woman of Substance, which stayed on the New York Times best-seller list for 25 months - to her latest, A Sudden Change of Heart, Bradford writes of strong, secure women with cosmopolitan lives who can handle independence but crave cuddling.
NEWS
March 14, 1997 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Is shopping a science? Maybe not, but the gift shop attached to the current "China: Ancient Arts and Sciences" exhibit at the Franklin Institute is one of the hottest attractions in the museum these days. "When the shop first opened last month," reported Debbie Gross, Franklin Institute director of retail sales, "we thought we'd ordered enough goods to last a month, but it sold in a week - 120 toy pandas sold in two days. Our highest-priced item - a $1,000 pearl necklace - was sold the first day. " Apparently, Franklin Institute visitors feel nothing could be finah than an item made in China . . . from pencils to chopsticks, from brush-painting kits to opera masks ("very popular with young boys," said store manager Ruth Seel)
NEWS
May 3, 1996 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
The days of Camelot are starting to look a lot like Cameloot. People are using items purchased at the recent Sotheby's auction not as keepsakes of an era gone by, but as investments. Comedienne Joan Rivers, for example, spent $11,000 to buy a modest painting of a tree and shortly thereafter announced she planned to have silk scarves made in the same design to be sold on the QVC shopping channel. "The crass commercialism didn't start with me," snapped Rivers to an interviewer who apparently was shocked that anyone might want to make money out of Jackie Kennedy Onassis memorabilia.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|