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Pears

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FOOD
November 15, 2012
Makes 6 to 8 servings For the dough: 2½ cups all-purpose    flour 2 tablespoons sugar 1 teaspoon salt 10 tablespoons unsalted    butter, cut into             1/4-inch pieces and          chilled 6 tablespoons vegetable shortening, cut in 1/2-inch pieces and chilled 8-10 tablespoons ice          water For the filling: 1/3 cup sugar 1 tablespoon cornstarch...
FOOD
January 12, 1992 | By Lynn Williams, Special to The Inquirer
Have you ever wondered about those red pears in the produce aisles at your local store? These jewels, known as Crimsons or Red Bartletts, have the same sweet, mellow flavor and smooth, juicy texture as yellow Bartletts, but sport ruddy skins. When they are to be used fresh, in salads or for eating out of hand, choose pears that are fully ripe, ones that will yield a little if probed with a finger. (Harder pears will ripen in a few days at room temperature.) However, for cooking, a slightly underripe pear is best.
FOOD
August 20, 1986 | By SYBIL FINKS, Special to the Daily News
Peaches and pears make a peach of a pair, and are plum delicious to boot. It's no wonder these perfect fruits' names add color and new meaning to our language. There are pips and pippins, and top bananas too, and many more I'm sure. But today I'm zeroing in on peaches and pears, those two delicate and delicious fruits, because once they reach their peak, they ripen quickly and must be used in a hurry or be wasted. Once they start to become soft, cut away any bad spots, peel if necessary, and slice them.
FOOD
January 10, 2001 | By Bev Bennett, FOR THE INQUIRER
Like many of life's pleasures, pears require patience. If you bite into one before its prime, you'll get no clue about the delights to come. It will be crunchy and taste slightly sour - sensations more akin to an apple. Pears are harvested while still hard so they'll bruise less during shipping. But unlike most fruits, they continue to ripen after picking. Within a few days, they go from green and bland to lush, tender and sweet. That means you'll have to plan your pear pleasures.
FOOD
October 27, 2011 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Staff Writer
In autumn, when apples and pears are plentiful, one's first instinct might be to fold them into a pie or a turnover. But do not overlook the possibilities of working them into soups, salads, and meat dishes. Adding fruit to savory dishes might seem foreign to some cooks, but the practice isn't new. Thai chefs add pineapple to meat and rice dishes, the English drizzle gooseberry sauce on roasted pork, and the French, of course, have their duck a l'orange. The smell of baking apples wafting through a kitchen will warm anyone on a gusty fall day. The scent of baked pears may be less familiar, but I can assure you, it is no less inviting.
FOOD
March 4, 2016
Makes 8 servings For the slaw: 1 cup shelled and skinned hazelnuts 1/4 red cabbage, cored 1/4 green cabbage, cored 1 fennel bulb, peeled 2 firm, ripe pears 1 bunch flat-leaf parsley, leaves only Sea salt Freshly ground black pepper For the dressing: 1 large egg yolk 1/2 tablespoon Dijon-style mustard 11/2 teaspoons honey 1 tablespoon cider vinegar 3/4 cup mild-tasting extra-virgin olive oil...
FOOD
February 27, 1994 | By Rena Coyle, FOR THE INQUIRER
Homespun desserts ought to be warm, flavorful and eaten with a spoon. They can be enjoyed while your family is relaxing, and give a satisfying touch to the end of the day. Pear Clafouti (pronounced cla-foo-tee) is one of my favorite desserts. It is quick and simple to make. Your children, including your youngest, will find every step one they can easily master. Because of the easy steps to preparing clafouti, as well as its quick baking time, it can be made at the last minute.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2008
Q: Can you tell me the difference between red Bartlett pears and Bosc pears, especially when it comes to cooking and serving them? I will have a lot of both from my in-laws this year, and any recipes would be appreciated. Best regards. - Joe F. A: Joe, when it comes to in-laws, it's better to have them drop off a couple of bushels of summer pears than to have them drop off a bunch of pear-shaped kids for the summer. You know I'm kidding . . . we all love our in-laws and their wonderful kids.
FOOD
October 16, 1991 | By Ethel G. Hofman, Special to The Inquirer
Smell a fully ripe pear. The flowery perfume offers just a hint of the superior flavor within. To really appreciate these fall fruits, you have to bite into the firm flesh. Delicious as pears are eaten out of hand, they are also extremely versatile in cooking. At least three varieties are available now and each lends itself to specific dishes. Yellow Bartletts hold their shape well in cakes and compotes, where their taste is intensified. The flesh of russet-brown Bosc pears is smooth, buttery and slightly spicy - ideal for salads.
FOOD
March 4, 2016
Thai Curry Chicken and Vegetables . . . 3 Stir-Fried Green Beans With Peanuts and Arbol Chilies . . . 4 Green Apple Relish . . . 4 Slaw With Pears, Toasted Hazlenuts and Buttermilk Dressing . . . 4 Lamb and Phyllo Cigars . . . 4
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FOOD
March 4, 2016
Makes 8 servings For the slaw: 1 cup shelled and skinned hazelnuts 1/4 red cabbage, cored 1/4 green cabbage, cored 1 fennel bulb, peeled 2 firm, ripe pears 1 bunch flat-leaf parsley, leaves only Sea salt Freshly ground black pepper For the dressing: 1 large egg yolk 1/2 tablespoon Dijon-style mustard 11/2 teaspoons honey 1 tablespoon cider vinegar 3/4 cup mild-tasting extra-virgin olive oil...
FOOD
March 4, 2016
Thai Curry Chicken and Vegetables . . . 3 Stir-Fried Green Beans With Peanuts and Arbol Chilies . . . 4 Green Apple Relish . . . 4 Slaw With Pears, Toasted Hazlenuts and Buttermilk Dressing . . . 4 Lamb and Phyllo Cigars . . . 4
FOOD
December 18, 2015
Camden Promise What a feast we had. The students voted to make fastest chicken parm (which isn't so fast when preparing for 18) and roasted carrots, with the new mixed-fruit cobbler for dessert. Ceanni Fernandez deftly cut five pounds of carrots, and not one sliver was left uneaten. Katherine Nunez, Naiomy Rodriguez, and sisters Emily and Jakelyn Hernandez tackled the fruit and found the pears slippery. Joaquin Estevez dedicated himself to chicken prep and everyone took a turn at clean-up.
FOOD
December 17, 2015
Makes 8-10 servings For the topping: 1 cup all-purpose flour 1/4 cup packed brown sugar 1 cup old-fashioned oats 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 8 tablespoons chilled unsalted butter, cut into 8 pieces 1 teaspoon vanilla extract For the filling: 2 to 3 (depending on size) Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored, cut into 1/2-inch chunks 2 to 3 pears, peeled, cored, cut into 1/2-inch chunks 1 cup fresh cranberries 1/4 cup granulated sugar Pinch of fine sea salt 2 teaspoons lemon zest 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour 1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Butter a 9-by-12 Pyrex glass casserole.
FOOD
November 15, 2012
Makes 6 to 8 servings For the dough: 2½ cups all-purpose    flour 2 tablespoons sugar 1 teaspoon salt 10 tablespoons unsalted    butter, cut into             1/4-inch pieces and          chilled 6 tablespoons vegetable shortening, cut in 1/2-inch pieces and chilled 8-10 tablespoons ice          water For the filling: 1/3 cup sugar 1 tablespoon cornstarch...
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
ASIAN PEARS and American electronics inventions would seem to have little in common. Yet in Coopersburg, just northwest of Allentown in the Lehigh Valley, rolling hillsides of firm juicy Asian pears are being harvested, a testimony to grass-roots Japanese-American business relations. Joel Spira and Ruth Rodale Spira founded their privately held company, Lutron Electronics, back in the late 1950s when Joel, then a young physicist, invented the solid-state dimmer switch. His energy-saving device elevated mood lighting to a new level - the original dimmer switch model is in the Smithsonian Institution's collection on electricity.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2012
HERE ARE SOME recipes using Asian pears from Subarashii Kudamono. ASIAN PEAR GINGER CAKE 2 tablespoons butter, room temperature 1/3 cup brown sugar 1 cup sliced, fresh Asian pears (Yoinashi if available) 1 1/2 cups flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves 1 teaspoon ground ginger 8 tablespoons butter, softened 3/4 cup sugar 2 eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/2 cup milk 1/2 cup grated fresh Asian pears (AsaJu, if available)
NEWS
May 24, 2012
2 apples 2 pears 1 pint blueberries 2 nectarines 2 peaches 1/4 to 1/3 cantaloupe or honeydew melon Juice and zest from one lemon   1. Wash tree fruit and berries; peel peaches and pears. 2. Cut fruit (except berries) into small pieces about ½ to ¾ inch long and combine in a bowl. 3. Add lemon zest and mix thoroughly. Add lemon juice so its acidity is balanced with the natural sweetness of the fruit. From the kitchen of Giuliana and Bob Pierson Per serving: 110 calories, 1 grams protein, 28 grams carbohydrates, 20 grams sugar, trace fat, no cholesterol, 2 milligrams sodium, 5 grams dietary fiber.
FOOD
March 8, 2012
As crusty old cheeses go, Laguiole is a giant, a 90-pound wheel of natural-rind character from the Aubrac plateau in the region of Rouergue, in southern France, where it is said to have descended from a mountain monastery in the 12th century. Similar to Cantal, but far less mass-produced, the raw-milk curds of these massive cylinders are uncooked but broken and pressed twice. The process creates a pelletlike texture inside the fresh cheese that, even after the five or so months of good aging before they land in Philadelphia, is still evident in the interior, which is delightfully both crumbly and creamy.
FOOD
October 27, 2011 | By Ashley Primis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Honeycrisp has become the Kim Kardashian of the apple world: It came out of nowhere, relatively recently (it was released commercially in the '90s), and with some marketing brilliance, took the fruit world by storm. Of course, there's a good reason people keep coming back to the Honeycrisp. It's sweet, uncontroversial, and delicious. It flies off the shelves, and keeps really well, which is why growers love it, too. Sort of. "Honeycrisp is by far the favorite apple," says Melissa Allen of Beechwood Orchards in Adams County.
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