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Peas

NEWS
May 16, 1993 | By Christopher Burrell, FOR THE INQUIRER
I pulled the farmer's banged-up pickup truck into the heavy stream of tourist traffic, cutting off station wagons and Range Rovers. I was headed to a dock at the harbor to pick up a shipment of Florida corn, bananas, peaches and tomatoes - crops that the farmer I was working for either didn't grow or that simply weren't ready in early July on this island, but that he nonetheless wanted to have available at his farm produce stand. I was here with my fiancee for a few days on what was kind of an indentured servant's holiday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1994 | By Laura Quinn, FOR THE INQUIRER
The strawberry patch at the S-Berry Farm in Frederick, Montgomery County, last weekend was not exactly a scene of bucolic calm. There was a traffic jam in front of the wooden stand where cashiers stood at the ready. Amateur pickers out for a day of agricultural sport ravaged the patch with the single-mindedness of bargain-hunters at a going-out-of-business sale. Crushed berries - likely the rejects of these picky pickers - littered the well-trodden rows between plants. "I've hit the jackpot!"
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | By Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
After a heavy workout with the weights, Hal Kaplan reaches for a couple of cold ones from the fridge. No, not beer. Not soda or even Gatorade. Peas. It used to be corn, but corn is too lumpy. He tried plain ice, but that was too messy. Peas are just right. So after each workout, the 62-year-old weightlifter grabs a couple of 16- ounce bags of frozen peas from the freezer and puts them on his aching shoulders. Kaplan's shoulders have been slowly degenerating since an overactive thyroid turned the 6-footer into 140 pounds of skin and bones a dozen years ago. Since then, Kaplan has upped his weight to 205 pounds, expanded his chest from 38 inches to 49 1/2 . . . and has shouldered more bags of frozen peas than the Jolly Green Giant.
FOOD
December 27, 1995 | By Faye Levy, FOR THE INQUIRER
Beans and rice are especially loved in the American South and in Caribbean countries. Red beans and rice are popular in Louisiana; black beans and rice appear often on the tables of Cuba and Puerto Rico; and pink beans with rice are a classic match in other Caribbean islands. These pairings not only taste great, but they make perfect nutritional sense, as the protein of the rice completes that of the beans. A dish of beans and rice can be a satisfying, healthful entree, as both ingredients contain virtually no fat and are cholesterol-free.
FOOD
May 20, 1992 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: One day, I ran out of plastic containers to freeze some leftovers. I looked into the freezer to see what I could take out and use. Then it occurred to me to take the size container I needed, remove the contents (frozen), and rewrap in foil to return to the freezer. I then had a container to use for my new food to be frozen. Now my containers are unlimited. - Carole Dear Polly: A recent suggestion about slightly warming leftover cat food was a good one. However, it won't go far enough to please that finicky cat. Cat food should be removed from the can before storing in the fridge; I use recycled cream-cheese containers.
NEWS
December 23, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / JOHN COSTELLO
Regular daily meals for the needy at Camden's Neighborhood Center, in the city's southwestern section at 278 Kaighn Ave., were brightened with special holiday touches yesterday as families enjoyed turkey, ham, meatloaf, macaroni and cheese, sweet potatoes, peas, tuna salad and dessert. The food was provided by volunteer staff members of the Camden County Board of Social Services, in cooperation with the Camden County Community Agencies. Three hundred families were expected to participate.
NEWS
May 10, 2012 | Maureen Fitzgerald
12 ounces frozen tiny green peas (preferably organic) 24 ounces chicken broth 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter 6 sprigs fresh tarragon, leaves picked off, stems discarded 6 sprigs fresh chervil or Italian parsley, leaves picked off and stems discarded 5 ounces fresh spinach, washed and stems removed, chopped Salt and white pepper to taste   1. Place the frozen peas in a medium saucepan, and just cover...
FOOD
June 7, 2007 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
This salad is an easy meal to make and serve in 30 minutes or less. It also is perfect picnic fare, conveniently made ahead, marinated for up to 24 hours, and served chilled. Shrimp Salad With Sugar Snap Peas Makes 4 to 6 servings 1. For the vinaigrette, in blender, puree the cilantro, scallions, vinegar, honey, cumin, lime (reserve the squeezed halves) and garlic. With blender on, add the oil in a slow, steady stream. Season with salt and pepper to taste; set aside.
FOOD
March 11, 1992 | By Bev Bennett, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Pasta primavera, so popular in the '80s, seems to have been relegated to the back burner along with blackened redfish. That's a shame, because this dish of pasta with peas, asparagus and cheese is well-suited to today's high-carbohydrate eating. To revive the basic idea, here is a risotto primavera. The mixture of vegetables, cheese and starch is the same. However, the creamy texture of arborio rice makes the dish seem even richer. One of the advantages of the original primavera was speed.
NEWS
June 3, 2011
Growing up, I firmly believed two things. First, I would one day be the starting power forward for the Philadelphia 76ers. Second, vegetables are bad. As I've gotten older, I've realized I lack both the height and the array of post moves to make it as an NBA starter. But the years have only affirmed my instincts about vegetables. The herbivore camp will point to the various health benefits of consuming leaves, stems, and roots. But these pale compared with the emotional, physical, and monetary costs.
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