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Peas

FOOD
March 17, 2011
A proper red-eye gravy gets its bold richness in part from a dose of strong black coffee. Shawn Sollberger, chef and co-owner of the new Northern Liberties pub Gunners Run, combines his grandfather's technique for chicken-fried steak with his North Carolina neighbor's red-eye gravy recipe. Instead of adding ham to the gravy, as is the norm, Sollberger crumbles bacon into the oil he uses to pan-fry the top round steak. He deglazes the pan with coffee. It's served with sauteed spinach and black-eyed peas.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2014 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
Plant peas and tomato seeds this weekend. Because peas take about two months from seed to harvest, early April is the latest you can plant them and still get good results. Peas like cooler temperatures, so plant them outdoors in the ground or in a container that's about 12 inches deep. I chose edible-pod Burpee 'Super Snappy' Pea this year, based entirely on the claim that they would produce huge peas, something I can't wait to taste. As for those tomato seeds, there's no time to waste.
NEWS
May 10, 2012 | Maureen Fitzgerald
12 ounces frozen tiny green peas (preferably organic) 24 ounces chicken broth 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter 6 sprigs fresh tarragon, leaves picked off, stems discarded 6 sprigs fresh chervil or Italian parsley, leaves picked off and stems discarded 5 ounces fresh spinach, washed and stems removed, chopped Salt and white pepper to taste   1. Place the frozen peas in a medium saucepan, and just cover...
NEWS
January 22, 1989 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
Even though St. Patrick's Day, the traditional date to begin spring planting, is still a couple of months away, it's time to get out the soft pencil and graph paper to rough out a plan for the vegetable garden. Before actually drawing a design, however, think back to last year's garden and assess its successes and failures. Did the tomato crop, for example, come in when you were on vacation? If so, check out the dates you expect to be away this year; perhaps you can plant a variety that will mature before you leave or after you return.
SPORTS
September 24, 2012 | By Kate Harman, FOR THE INQUIRER
Brittany Robinson and Briana Egenlauf like to think of themselves as "two peas in a pod" up top for the Archbishop Ryan girls' soccer team. On Monday, those peas were dangerous all afternoon, both scoring goals in the Ragdolls' 2-0 win over Catholic League opponent St. Hubert. The goals couldn't have been more different for Archbishop Ryan, but they counted just the same. They were also both the product of a hardworking Ragdoll team that won the majority of 50/50 balls and pressed the St. Hubert (4-4, 3-2 Catholic League)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2011 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
We have grown accustomed to - no, make that attached to - the calendar on the wall of our kitchen that reproduces the vintage drawings from something called Album Benary, an archive so foreign to us that we have long assumed (wrongly) it was of Italian extraction. It's labeled the Farmer's Market 2010 calendar, which isn't quite its actual focus: the vegetable illustrations, as carefully detailed as Audubon prints, date from 1876, when they were made by the noted seed collector and breeder Ernst Benary, a German, it turns out. Atop each month, on ivory-colored stock, are depictions, for instance, of varieties of luminous, silken onions that might be (if inflated)
FOOD
March 5, 1995 | By Bev Bennett, FOR THE INQUIRER
Imagine chunks of chicken and vegetables in a smooth, herb sauce. Then, add to that vision, a golden, flaky crust. It's the all-time great: chicken pot pie. Don't look to your freezer case for the perfect pot pie. What you'll get there is about as soggy as a rainy day. This is one dinner you'll have to make to appreciate. The traditional recipe, with a pastry crust and filling, is more time- consuming and requires more effort than many cooks can afford on weeknights, so I created a delicious quick version using phyllo dough.
FOOD
July 29, 1998 | by Peggy Landers, Daily News Staff Writer
PEAS, PLEASE Compulsively follow directions? Stifle yourself next time you pull out the frozen peas. Sure, the directions on the bag tell you to boil them. But think about it: Those tiny, defenseless spheres already were cooked before freezing - why do you want to cook them again? Here's what you do, according to "Vegetables: The Most Authoritative Guide to Buying, Preparing, and Cooking" ($35, William Morrow and Company): Thaw, then heat briefly in butter, olive oil or a little broth.
NEWS
March 6, 1988 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
I welcome March with mixed feelings. On one hand, I'm delighted at the prospect of planting peas, setting out onions and, toward the end of the month, starting some tender crops inside. On the other hand, I know the beginning of gardening season signals the end of any spare weekend time for other pursuits. Before you get ambitious this month and dig up the whole yard to hold all those luscious plants you've seen in seed catalogues, think about your leisure time. There's nothing worse than a beautiful garden in May that is a wreck by August because you can't get around to weeding or harvesting.
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