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Peas

FOOD
March 11, 1992 | By Bev Bennett, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Pasta primavera, so popular in the '80s, seems to have been relegated to the back burner along with blackened redfish. That's a shame, because this dish of pasta with peas, asparagus and cheese is well-suited to today's high-carbohydrate eating. To revive the basic idea, here is a risotto primavera. The mixture of vegetables, cheese and starch is the same. However, the creamy texture of arborio rice makes the dish seem even richer. One of the advantages of the original primavera was speed.
NEWS
June 3, 2011
Growing up, I firmly believed two things. First, I would one day be the starting power forward for the Philadelphia 76ers. Second, vegetables are bad. As I've gotten older, I've realized I lack both the height and the array of post moves to make it as an NBA starter. But the years have only affirmed my instincts about vegetables. The herbivore camp will point to the various health benefits of consuming leaves, stems, and roots. But these pale compared with the emotional, physical, and monetary costs.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
You will hear, on occasion, expats from Trinidad pine for a lost land - for beaches that are gone, and trails paved over, for the slower boat to Tobago (now it's a two-hour trip, not an overnight), and island architecture washed away by a wave of Americanized design. Last week one of them named Clarence Drakes, an architect himself, happened by Calypso, the homey Trinidadian stand in the Chestnut Hill Farmers Market, and he soon fell into a deep, misty-eyed reverie. Ah, but the food, reminded his friend Ayanna Osbourne, who has family ties on the island, that's another matter: No one has torn that page from Trinidad's story.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2014 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
Plant peas and tomato seeds this weekend. Because peas take about two months from seed to harvest, early April is the latest you can plant them and still get good results. Peas like cooler temperatures, so plant them outdoors in the ground or in a container that's about 12 inches deep. I chose edible-pod Burpee 'Super Snappy' Pea this year, based entirely on the claim that they would produce huge peas, something I can't wait to taste. As for those tomato seeds, there's no time to waste.
FOOD
March 17, 2011
A proper red-eye gravy gets its bold richness in part from a dose of strong black coffee. Shawn Sollberger, chef and co-owner of the new Northern Liberties pub Gunners Run, combines his grandfather's technique for chicken-fried steak with his North Carolina neighbor's red-eye gravy recipe. Instead of adding ham to the gravy, as is the norm, Sollberger crumbles bacon into the oil he uses to pan-fry the top round steak. He deglazes the pan with coffee. It's served with sauteed spinach and black-eyed peas.
FOOD
March 12, 2009
Happy St. Patty's Day Simple is better. Ask chef Ben McNamara what goes into his luxuriously rich shepherd's pie at St. Stephen's Green, the Fairmount pub, and he's a bit incredulous at the suggestion that it's more than it is. How fancy can it get? He starts with mirepoix (carrot, celery, onion), adds 90-percent-lean ground sirloin, roux, tomato paste, beef stock and peas. Then he pipes fresh potatoes whipped with heavy cream and butter on top. - Michael Klein Shepherd's pie ($12)
NEWS
May 10, 2012 | Maureen Fitzgerald
12 ounces frozen tiny green peas (preferably organic) 24 ounces chicken broth 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter 6 sprigs fresh tarragon, leaves picked off, stems discarded 6 sprigs fresh chervil or Italian parsley, leaves picked off and stems discarded 5 ounces fresh spinach, washed and stems removed, chopped Salt and white pepper to taste   1. Place the frozen peas in a medium saucepan, and just cover...
NEWS
January 22, 1989 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
Even though St. Patrick's Day, the traditional date to begin spring planting, is still a couple of months away, it's time to get out the soft pencil and graph paper to rough out a plan for the vegetable garden. Before actually drawing a design, however, think back to last year's garden and assess its successes and failures. Did the tomato crop, for example, come in when you were on vacation? If so, check out the dates you expect to be away this year; perhaps you can plant a variety that will mature before you leave or after you return.
FOOD
March 5, 1995 | By Bev Bennett, FOR THE INQUIRER
Imagine chunks of chicken and vegetables in a smooth, herb sauce. Then, add to that vision, a golden, flaky crust. It's the all-time great: chicken pot pie. Don't look to your freezer case for the perfect pot pie. What you'll get there is about as soggy as a rainy day. This is one dinner you'll have to make to appreciate. The traditional recipe, with a pastry crust and filling, is more time- consuming and requires more effort than many cooks can afford on weeknights, so I created a delicious quick version using phyllo dough.
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