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Peas

ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2004 | By MIKE MCGRATH For the Daily News
1Start with the right size. Whether you're installing something simple like a window box or planning to pose a prodigious posse of ponderously pretty pots 'pon your porch, BIGGER IS BETTER! (Sorry, guys - but all those e-mails you've been getting are true.) The larger your containers, the less you'll have to worry about them drying out quickly during dry spells. And hey - you'll be able to fit more stuff inside of them too; that's always a plus. 2Ixnay on soil from the gardenay.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2003 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Black Eyed Peas' new CD, Elephunk, sounds like a nonstop party mix. But according to Taboo, one of the group's three MCs, it is "the most personal and intimate" release yet for the unpredictable Los Angeles hip-hop collective. "We experienced a lot of personal issues [during the recording], like breakups," Taboo says on the phone from the HSBC Arena in Buffalo, where the Peas are opening the Justified and Stripped Tour headlined by Justin Timberlake and Christina Aguilera. Consider "Anxiety," a track recorded with metal mongers Papa Roach.
FOOD
December 31, 2000 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
Black-eyed peas, a staple in Southern diets for more than 300 years, have many names. They were originally called cowpeas, since they were widely used as cattle feed. They were brought to the West Indies from Africa, and by the 1700s were being grown extensively in Georgia. Hoppin' John, a humble dish that uses black-eyed peas and rice, has traditionally been associated with good luck when served on New Year's Day. It is widely held that this simple dish can be traced to slaves in Charleston, S.C., and on nearby rice plantations.
FOOD
October 1, 2000 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
Stir-frying is perhaps the best-known of the Chinese cooking methods. It involves quick cooking over high heat in a small amount of oil and stirring the food frequently during the process. Stir-frying can be done in a wok or in any large, nonstick frying pan. Although you can use an ordinary frying pan, it won't cook as fast or keep the vegetables as crisp as cooking in a wok would. I prefer to use a heavy gauge, 14-inch stir-fry pan that features the sloping sides of the typical wok. A pan of this size is similar to the wok in that the heat concentrates at the bottom of the pan and the curved sides allow you to push cooked ingredients to cooler areas.
SPORTS
April 6, 2000 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple against Memphis in a home-and-home basketball series. John Chaney and John Calipari, together again. "I saw him out at the Final Four," Chaney said yesterday. "He walked up and choked me. " Temple and Memphis, which recently hired Calipari, are talking about a series that would include a game at Memphis next season with a return date at the Liacouras Center in 2001-02. "He was interested, but he had not yet sat down to see what had been scheduled," Chaney said.
NEWS
March 12, 2000 | By John V.R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If there ever was any question about the growing popularity of Indian cuisine in our region, take a look at Ardmore, which has three Indian restaurants within a few blocks of each other. While that's a terrific development, only one of the three - Khajuraho in Ardmore Plaza on Greenfield Avenue - has exceptional food. The two others - Taste of India next to the movie house and the newer Bombay Grill almost directly across Lancaster Avenue - offer decent but boring, watered-down dishes.
FOOD
November 14, 1999 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
Enticing aromas from a hearty, nourishing meal warm the soul. Even the most jaded diner will recall the soothing pleasure and gracious welcome of toothsome one-dish meals. Among the many "comfort foods" rooted in the traditional American kitchen, a steaming bowl of split-pea soup or hearty chili can invoke much soul-satisfying nostalgia. Soups can be the most filling and satisfying of comfort foods, especially as the temperature begins to drop. They are hot and hearty, but all too often they are also high in fat, calories and unnecessary cholesterol.
NEWS
October 31, 1999 | By Michael Stoll, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The same oil industry that 10 years ago accidentally sullied the Atlantic coast's largest heron sanctuary here is engineering a solution that promises to cordon off the wildlife habitat from future spills. An environmental consortium financed by refineries and other industries in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware began positioning a five-mile ring of 50 buoys last week around Pea Patch Island. The Delaware Bay and River Cooperative says that in event of a spill, it can string foam booms between all the buoys within eight hours, enveloping the island's shoreline and blocking oil slicks.
NEWS
August 1, 1999 | By Todd Shapera, FOR THE INQUIRER
"It's not the north shore of Alaska, but it's not an area for make-believe," warns Tom Bergh, owner of Maine Island Kayak Co. "The area is wild, rugged, woolly and let's-get-real. One of the few areas left on the East Coast that has honest adventuring. " The area Bergh is describing is a part of Maine that people refer to as Down East - the state's easternmost shoreline. For kayaking purposes, the area begins where much of the state's tourism ends. It may be only 85 nautical miles to the Canadian border, but the undulating coast offers 920 miles of some of the most rugged shoreline on the Atlantic seaboard, with hidden coves, cobble beaches and dramatic headlands.
FOOD
June 30, 1999 | by Alicia Ross with Beverly Mills, For the Daily News
Rice is the perfect accompaniment for a variety of wonderfully spicy foods, stews or soups. But even this perfect plain food needs a little zest every now and then. Lucky for the desperate cook, rice is easy to alter. A little change here and a small addition there, and we've got a whole new recipe to enjoy. In today's recipe, we've used a flavorful combination of reduced-fat coconut milk and water with chicken bouillon crystals and allspice for zip. Instant (5-minute) rice makes a quickie pilaf even faster, since it only has to steam for five minutes.
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