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Pedestrian Bridge

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NEWS
November 24, 1991 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
The chain-link fence that lines the 69th Street Terminal bridge in Upper Darby is coming down. Replacing the galvanized wire with earth-toned ornamental fencing is one of the improvements planned for the bridge, which connects the SEPTA terminal to the 69th Street shopping district. Patrick J. Gavin, a member of Citizens for a Better Bridge (FABB), discussed the plans during a Township Council meeting Wednesday. "We are pleased that the changes will comply with the federal accessibility standards," said Gavin.
NEWS
December 16, 1999 | By Mike Madden, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Most pedestrian bridges are not built to withstand an impact like the one that knocked down an overpass in Cherry Hill on Tuesday, and no regulations require that much strength, transportation officials and experts said yesterday as an investigation into the accident continued. The 55-ton walkway over Route 38 near the Cherry Hill Mall was torn from its supports and crashed onto the road about 8 a.m. when a garbage truck slammed into it. The truck, driven by James R. Kelley, 43, of Lindenwold, hit the bridge about 35 to 40 m.p.h.
NEWS
March 11, 1993 | By Michelle R. Davis, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The pedestrian bridge that spans Market Street and provides a walkway connecting SEPTA's 69th Street terminal with the shopping district is made of thick, rusty girders. A chain-link fence encloses the bridge, the stairs have rusted through, and the elevator doesn't work. It is not a pretty sight. But Upper Darby wants to turn the pedestrian bridge into something useful and attractive, said Chief Administrative Officer F. Raymond Shay. A recent plan proposed by the administration would pump between $300,000 and $400,000 into renovating the bridge, which has been closed for several months because of a lack of repairs.
NEWS
January 13, 2000 | By Mike Madden, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A pedestrian bridge over Route 38 that a truck knocked down last month will be replaced, though Department of Transportation administrators do not know exactly when, officials said. The 55-ton bridge, which spanned Route 38 near the Cherry Hill Mall for more than 30 years, crashed onto the highway during rush hour on Dec. 14 after a Five County Carting Inc. garbage truck driven by James R. Kelley, 43, of Lindenwold, tore it from its moorings, according to authorities. A hydraulic lift on the back of the truck, used to handle Dumpsters, was left up when Kelley drove under the bridge, police said.
NEWS
December 24, 1996 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The township has added a little zip to the 69th Street pedestrian bridge just in time for the holidays and the prime shopping season. Two large blue lighted signs that read "69th Street," one on each side of the bridge, leave no room for doubt about where one happens to be shopping. The reviews yesterday were mostly favorable. "It looks great," said Robert Schiffer, executive assistant at Renter's Choice at 6906 Market St. "It looks more like a destination shopping area. " "I like it. . . . It looks real nice at night," said Melinda Lowe, a saleswoman at Small's Formal Wear at Market and 69th Streets.
NEWS
May 17, 1999 | By Brooks Barnes, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Officials are moving ahead with an ambitious plan to create an uninterrupted eight-mile trail linking the Struble Trail and the county's new park at the Church Farm School in Exton. The centerpiece of the project, estimated to cost nearly $2 million, would be a $700,000 pedestrian bridge over Route 100 at Sheree Boulevard. Plans, which have been approved by supervisors, also call for an extensive overhaul of a two-mile jogging path in developer Bob Hankin's Eagleview subdivision.
NEWS
July 1, 1995 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The new South Street bridge isn't for getting over the Delaware River. It's for getting to the Delaware River. Ever since the great artificial gorge that carries Interstate 95 was carved, South Street and Queen Village have been cut off from the waterfront. The new $3.1 million pedestrian bridge, championed for years by the neighborhood association and others, is a step toward getting the river back. The bridge connects South Street and Columbus Boulevard just south of Penn's Landing.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police are searching for a third day for a 13-year-old boy who was swept away in Pennypack Creek. Brandon Boyle disappeared Monday after jumping into the rain-swollen creek from a pedestrian bridge in Pennypack Park. His brother, Anthony, 11, also went into the swift flowing water but made it back to shore.
NEWS
May 7, 1987 | By Bill Walls, Special to The Inquirer
A temporary pedestrian bridge is to be constructed in connection with the planned closing of the Clifton Avenue bridge, which carries vehicular and pedestrian traffic between the boroughs of Collingdale and Sharon Hill. The Clifton Avenue bridge, which spans railroad tracks, is to be closed Monday so that it can be replaced by a new structure, according to PennDOT spokesman James Bergmaier. One lane of the old bridge will remain open for pedestrians until the temporary pedestrian bridge can be approved and built.
NEWS
January 20, 1991 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lower Merion officials have squelched the idea of constructing a temporary pedestrian walkway near the Bowman Avenue bridge, which has been closed to vehicular traffic for more than two years while the aging span is being rebuilt. Township Manager David C. Latshaw, in a Jan. 11 memorandum to the Board of Commissioners, said the township engineer had recommended that the township not construct a pedestrian bridge at the site because it would be too costly. The engineer, John J. Gillespie of Pennoni Associates, also expressed concern for the safety of pedestrians while major reconstruction was going on, the memo said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 25, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Burlington County freeholders put off the day of reckoning for the Centerton Bridge after hearing emotional testimony from residents for whom the 112-year-old span has been a scenic shortcut. Recognizing residents' attachment to the two-lane span between Mount Laurel and Willingboro, which was shut in April after it was found to be structurally deficient, the freeholders postponed an expected vote this week on demolishing it. The board decided to hold another hearing in the next few weeks before proceeding with the vote.
NEWS
June 29, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Consider it Philadelphia's very own Stonehenge, a towering structure of mysterious origin on the Delaware waterfront that faces the morning sun, and that every summer weekend receives hordes of pilgrims who gather around its base. True, they're usually there for a music festival, not to worship at the four-story, concrete megalith draped with a "Welcome to Penn's Landing" banner. The plinth has loomed over the riverfront for so long an entire generation probably has no idea what purpose it was meant to serve.
NEWS
February 7, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than a century after being built between two country roads, the one-lane Chandler Mill Bridge is largely unchanged. The rest of Chester County, however, has changed. Minutes away from the Kennett Township structure, cars and tractor-trailers rumble along Route 1. Developments are multiplying. It's no surprise that old and new interests collided at the picturesque bridge, but the outcome was unlikely. Last month, the township supervisors agreed to spend $1 million to acquire and preserve the bridge as a pedestrian walkway, scuttling a county plan to demolish it and replace it with a two-lane thoroughfare.
NEWS
August 30, 2014
ISSUE | LABOR DEAL Own up, don't blame If my plane takes off at 2:00 but I arrive at the airport at 2:05, it is my fault that I missed it ("Carpenters ready and willing to work," Aug. 26). The Convention Center set a deadline for the unions. Two out of six missed the deadline. Whose fault was that? Union leaders are not doing their members any favors by blaming management. Union members should elect more responsible leaders who can follow the rules. Large ads in newspapers complaining about being locked out only serve to pass the buck for their irresponsibility.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Community improvement projects across the region have lost hundreds of thousands of dollars in federal funding after the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development changed its low- and moderate-income maps in the middle of the grant process. The update, which happened in June, took some local officials by surprise and has them scrambling to find money for such projects as a pedestrian bridge at a Hatboro-Horsham school and improvements to the Ambler Community Center. Montgomery County had already selected the projects to fund when HUD updated the maps.
NEWS
April 28, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
St. Joseph's University truly is the home of the Hawks. They've got the birds to prove it. Two red-tailed hawks have nested in a towering pine on the lawn of McShain Hall, a freshman residence next to the pedestrian bridge that arches over City Avenue into Philadelphia. The university community is enthralled with the birds, monitoring them via a "Hawkcam" set up April 2 on the fifth floor of McShain. There are signs that chicks are on the way. "Everybody's got their fingers crossed," Michael McCann, biology professor and associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, said Thursday.
NEWS
April 27, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
St. Joseph's University really is the home of the Hawks. They've got the birds to prove it. Two red-tailed hawks have nested in a towering pine on the lawn of McShain Hall, a freshman residence next to the pedestrian bridge that arches over City Avenue into Philadelphia. The university community is enthralled with the birds, monitoring them via a "Hawkcam" set up April 2 on the fifth floor of McShain. There are signs chicks are on the way. "Everybody's got their fingers crossed," Michael McCann, biology professor and associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, said Thursday.
NEWS
April 3, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Villanova University has cleared a major hurdle in its expansion plans, which include building dormitories on an existing parking lot along Lancaster Avenue. The Radnor Township Board of Commissioners voted late Monday night to approve zoning changes for the estimated $300 million project, a step that took two years and drew strong opposition from some residents. Villanova wants to build new dormitories, a performing arts center, parking garage, and campus bookstore. A vocal group of residents has spent thousands of dollars and has packed meetings to fight the plans, which some said would increase traffic and noise while bringing an unwanted urban feel to their Main Line community in Delaware County.
NEWS
March 18, 2014 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
PENNSAUKEN Just after his van struck and killed a pedestrian on Admiral Wilson Boulevard early Sunday morning, the driver got out of his vehicle to help - only to be hit by a vehicle that fled the scene. The tragic sequence of events occurred about 3:10 a.m. at the intersection of Admiral Wilson Boulevard and Lee Avenue, police said. The pedestrian, a 31-year-old man whose name was not released, was walking across the highway when he was hit, police said. He was pronounced dead at the scene.
SPORTS
January 31, 2014 | Daily News staff and wire reports
NOTRE DAME yesterday announced a $400 million plan to expand its 84-year-old football stadium, adding thousands of premium seats plus new buildings at the "House that Rockne Built. " The new buildings will house a student center on the west side, the anthropology and psychology departments and a digital media center on the east side and music and sacred music departments on the south side, leaving the side facing Touchdown Jesus unchanged. The Rev. John Jenkins, the university president, called it "the most ambitious building project in the 172-year history of Notre Dame," saying more space was needed to accommodate the university's broadening research activity.
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