CollectionsPedestrian Safety
IN THE NEWS

Pedestrian Safety

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
October 2, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
The business community in the tiny Chester County town of Malvern is looking forward to better times. If an economic recovery kicks in, that would be welcome, too. But for now, what will constitute better times for the stores and restaurants that line King Street, the borough's main commerce corridor, is when a construction project in the heart of town since February 2010 finally comes to an end, possibly by Nov. 1. The goal of the $9.9...
NEWS
April 16, 2008
Keeping Philadelphia's sidewalks open - no matter what's being built overhead - should be one of those initiatives that Rina Cutler, Mayor Nutter's transportation chief, calls "the small stuff that makes a difference in day-to-day living. " In a city known for its walkability, a policy banning builders from blocking sidewalks makes so much sense. Such a rule should have been enacted years ago. With the recent boom in condo building, it's long overdue. But expect a knockdown, drag-out fight with developers over Councilman James F. Kenney's campaign to impose better rules of engagement on city pavement.
NEWS
January 23, 1997 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the assumption that Philadelphia drivers don't know they are supposed to yield to pedestrians at crosswalks, police plan to issue tickets, Police Commissioner Richard Neal said yesterday. Operation Crosswalk, a 90-day pedestrian-safety campaign, starts tomorrow. Police said they will begin writing tickets on Feb. 13 to motorists, cyclists and pedestrians who violate regulations at intersections. Till then, officers will issue warnings and pass out brochures explaining the laws, Neal said.
NEWS
December 13, 1994 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia pedestrian is not yet an endangered species, but city officials said yesterday that steps had to be taken to ensure continued survival. Mayor Rendell acknowledged that the city lost a long-standing designation for safety when the number of pedestrian deaths rose sharply last year. The response is a soft-sell campaign aimed at predatory drivers and careless walkers. There were 58 pedestrian deaths last year, a 33 percent increase from 1992. A partial toll for this year was not available, nor were details on where the deaths occurred.
NEWS
July 7, 1999 | By Martin Z. Braun, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Opening another front in its campaign to tame traffic, the borough has applied to the state Department of Transportation for money to widen the curbs on Merchant Street, install a bike-path entrance across from the high school, and pour asphalt for speed bumps and raised crosswalks around town. The application, authorized at last week's borough caucus meeting, incorporates pedestrian safety recommendations that Lehr & Associates, a Trenton transportation planning firm, made at a special March meeting.
NEWS
March 10, 2005 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four Bucks County municipalities yesterday were among the first in the state to receive money from a new initiative aimed at enhancing community life. Grants totaling $2.3 million were awarded to Doylestown Borough and Township, Quakertown and Yardley. The communities were among 141 to receive nearly $130 million from the state Department of Transportation, mostly for street, sidewalk and lighting improvements. "These programs will help fund a town-building effort that is imperative to the Rendell administration," said Charles Metzger, PennDot spokesman.
NEWS
April 5, 1999 | By Martin Z. Braun, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
On a clear, sunny day a year and a half ago, Audubon resident Joe Mannion got the scare of his life. Mannion's children, aged 5, 3 and 1, had just finished playing in front of their Hampshire Avenue home when a motorist speeding down the popular cut-through street lost control of his car and skidded over the sidewalk. The car barreled toward Mannion's house, finally coming to rest against its front step. "My heart went into my mouth," Mannion said as he retold the story at a meeting of the Audubon Traffic Safety Awareness Committee last month at Audubon High School.
NEWS
April 9, 1997 | By Drake Witham, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
It may be great exercise, but walking can be hazardous to your health. According to a new study, more than 6,100 pedestrians die and 110,000 are injured in car accidents each year, with children and seniors at the greatest risk. The most dangerous areas are newer cities in the South and West, where six-lane highways have been built to accommodate exponentially growing traffic problems and residential areas sometimes lack sidewalks and crosswalks. "Pedestrian safety is an unacknowledged public health problem," said Hank Dittmar, executive director of the Surface Transportation Policy Project, a highway-safety advocacy group that produced the study with the Environmental Working Group.
NEWS
January 28, 1997
Neither the jaywalker nor the driver who fails to yield to law-abiding pedestrians gets a free ride in a new program announced last week to make Philadelphia's streets a little safer. Beginning Feb. 13, and for the next few months, police will be writing tickets to motorists, cyclists and pedestrians who violate regulations at 10 high-volume intersections. Among the hot spots are four on Broad Street - at Locust Street, Passyunk, Olney and Allegheny Avenues - two on Market Street at Eighth and 52d Streets, and Kensington and Allegheny Avenues.
NEWS
December 30, 1990 | By Robert DiGiacomo, Special to The Inquirer
As Moorestown's Main Street has evolved from a quiet thoroughfare to a congested artery, a common complaint among residents has been that you cannot cross the street without risking your life. "There's way too much traffic and no supervision, and you simply can't get across the street unless you take your life in your hands," said Margie Harris, a 30-year resident who is president The Women's Club in Moorestown. Harris and The Women's Club want to channel their concerns over pedestrian safety into action.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 29, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
Their voices echoed as they moved south down Haddon Avenue and under I-676, bouncing back from the light-green metal supports of the overpass as traffic rumbled overhead. "Watch out for kids! Put your cellphones down!" Gabby Colon chanted toward the cars that passed by, some honking in support. Around her walked more than 80 people, crowding and spilling over from the sidewalk into the street. Many wore white T-shirts with a picture of 5-year-old Richard Pagan superimposed on a Captain America shield.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
More than a month later, the horror of Zachary Woods' death still sends a chill down a pedestrian's spine. The 27-year-old Wharton student was walking along Walnut Street toward the Penn campus on a bright Tuesday morning when an out-of-control motorist slammed into another car at the 30th Street intersection. Spinning like a top, the car jumped the sidewalk on the south side and sent Woods plunging over the railing into Penn Park, 38 feet below. While news reports called it a "freak accident," you can't help wondering if it was entirely unpredictable.
NEWS
April 2, 2013
Fund cyclist, pedestrian safety When transportation is underfunded - as has long been the case in Pennsylvania - not only do motorists and transit users suffer from aging infrastructure and safety risks, but bicyclists and pedestrians also suffer from the poor quality of roads and bridges, while having access to fewer dedicated bike lanes and sidewalks. In a welcome move, Gov. Corbett proposes to raise $1.8 billion over five years through a variety of fees and by uncapping the oil-company franchise tax. The governor's proposal also includes a multi-modal fund that will be a dedicated source to promote biking and walking.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's first official transportation report card gave high marks to highway safety, and low grades to road maintenance and bridge conditions. Issued Friday, as state lawmakers begin to craft a new budget, the report called for more money for highways, bridges, and public transit. Gov. Corbett has proposed a $1.8 billion boost in transportation funding, to be paid for with higher gas taxes. Friday's report was essentially a self-assessment, prepared for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation and two advisory panels by consultant Gannett Fleming Inc. It cost $70,000.
NEWS
February 8, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an effort to reduce fatal train-pedestrian accidents, NJ Transit will increase police patrols at high-risk locations and step up public-education efforts, state transportation commissioner James Simpson said Wednesday. The Inquirer reported last week that at least 91 pedestrians were killed by trains on NJ Transit and SEPTA lines in 2010 and 2011. Many of those who died intended to take their own lives, often to the horror of train engineers, passengers, and bystanders.
NEWS
December 9, 2011
With Dilworth Plaza fenced off for construction, Mayor Nutter asked people to stay on the sidewalks instead of traipsing through the streets. The fence cuts off access to the west half of City Hall, which had been a major pedestrian thoroughfare. Since the barriers went up last week, many people have chosen to walk in the street on JFK Boulevard and 15th Street. Nutter held a news conference Thursday, asking them to stop. "There is no safe place on the side of 15th Street for people to walk," he said, adding that crossing to a sidewalk would add only a few minutes at most to the typical trip.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
The business community in the tiny Chester County town of Malvern is looking forward to better times. If an economic recovery kicks in, that would be welcome, too. But for now, what will constitute better times for the stores and restaurants that line King Street, the borough's main commerce corridor, is when a construction project in the heart of town since February 2010 finally comes to an end, possibly by Nov. 1. The goal of the $9.9...
NEWS
May 25, 2011 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Roads such as Roosevelt Boulevard in Philadelphia and Route 130 in Burlington County are death traps for pedestrians because the multilane highways encourage fast driving and give nonmotorists few places to cross safely. A new study by advocates for pedestrians, bicyclists, and transit riders, released Tuesday and based on federal data, calls for more sidewalks, bike lanes, and other features to make travel safer on such dangerous highways. The report cited the 47,741 pedestrian deaths in the last decade as "the equivalent of a jumbo jet full of passengers crashing roughly every month.
NEWS
May 24, 2011 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Roads such as Roosevelt Boulevard in Philadelphia and U.S. 130 in Burlington County are death traps for pedestrians because the wide, multilane highways encourage fast driving and give non-motorists few places to cross safely. A new study by advocates for pedestrians, bicyclists and transit riders, released Tuesday and based on federal data, called for more sidewalks, bike lanes and other features to make travel safer on such dangerous highways. The report cited the 47,741 pedestrian deaths in the past decade as "the equivalent of a jumbo jet full of passengers crashing roughly every month.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|